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rWENTY^FOUR PAGES, 




CENTS. 




Entered at teoond-clast ma iter December 22, 1905, at the pott office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of Oongrett of March 3, 1919. 



VARIETY 



THE SITUATION. 

There lias been no material change in 
the vaudeville situation from one week 
ago as far as the managers are concerned. 
The Morris office and the Keith Agency- 
have neither decreased nor increased their 
bookings. 

Plenty of rumors are in circulation, 
mostly concerning the intention of the art- 
iste. One plan fathered by a prominent 
artist of considerable means was the gath- 
ering together of all influential artiste in 
a big stock corporation, with a paid in 
capital at the start sufficient to ensure 
confidence in the stability of the company 
and induce other capital. 

The formation to be on business lines 
for the purpose of sending out road com- 
panies to the number of fifteen at least, 
carrying nine acts and guaranteeing thirty 
weeks. The plan is regarded as visionary, 
for under certain conditions that much 
time could not be secured. 

The coming week will undoubtedly de- 
cide the attitude of the SullivaniOonsidine 
circuit. It is understood that John J. 
Ryan, the president of the company owning 
the cheaper circuits, has declined all over- 
tures made on behalf of the Keith inter- 
ests on the ground that an affiliation with 
Keith and. the Western Vaudeville Asso- 
ciation would not be beneficial. Some of 
the houses east of Chicago are capable of 
presenting first-class attractions. It is be- 
lieved that Ryan favors booking through 
the William Morris office and entering into 
active competition. 

It depends a great deal upon the final 
decision of the Sullivan -Oonsidine circuit 
what the immediate outcome will be. If 
it concludes to enter the Morris office, 
available time for all acts will be at hand. 

The talk of Keith-Proctor taking over 
the New York Theatre and the effect upon 
Hammerstein caused considerable com- 
ment. It is hardly to be expected that 
Hammerstein will be forced by this move 
into the Keith office for protection that can 
not be given there. Unless Williams went 
with him, Hammerstein would be far 
worse off than at present. The Keith peo- 
ple in possession of the New York will not 
be in a good position as Apposition to 
Hammerstein unless time is found for 
large acts after playing that house. One 
week will not satisfy big salaried aets, 
and Keith has this problem to solve. 

The artists are still perplexed, awaiting 
an announcement from either side to help 
toward a determination where most favor 
able time mav be had for next season. 



SULLIVAN-CONSIDINE EXECUTIVE 
BOARD MEETING. 

Chicago, June 1. 

A meeting or conference is being held 
here to-day of the executive powers of 
the Sullivan-Oonsidinc and International 
Theatre circuits. 

John J. Ryan, the president of the com- 
bined companies, and John W. Considine 
with William O'Brien are talking matters 
over. 

Another executive board meeting will 
be held next week in New York City. It 
is possible that at that time will be de- 
cided the future policy as regards bookings. 



J. AUSTIN FYNES WITH KEITH. 

The upshot of the recent connection be- 
tween B. F. Keith, F. F. Proctor and J. 
Austin Fy nes is that Mr. Fynes will go 
abroad acting as the agent for the new 
combination. 

It will be Mr. Fynes' mission to bring 
t he foreign vaudeville managers together 
as a component part of the Keith circuit, 
giving the Keith Booking Agency an in- 
ternational power. 

Mr. Fynes has not given out his date 
for sailing, retaining that as a secret, but 
it will be shortly, and he will be accom- 
panied by Philip K. Mindil, who has been 
associated with Mr. Fynes in his many 
ventures. 

Mr. Fynes while abroad may organize 
the foreign office the Keith people have 
decided upon maintaining, but he will not 
assume personal charge of it. 



CIRCUS MEN REPORTED DEAD. 

Chicago, Juno 1. 

A cablegram revived here says that 
"Tom" Fitzgerald of the Great Circus, 
Australia, and his manager, Frank Jones, 
died in Burmah, India, of Bright's dis- 
ease. Owing to the peculiar wording of 
the message further word is being awaited 
before the announced deaths are believed. 

Robert Brough, an actor -manager, is 
also reported to have died at Darling 
Hurst, Now South Wales, after a short 
illness. 



FIELDS SIGNS VICTORIA. 

From a wireless message returned to 
New York by way of Liverpool it became 
known during the week that Lew Fields 
has engaged Vesta Victoria for his Herald 
Square Theatre company for next season. 

Mr. Fields and Miss Victoria left New 
York on the same boat ten days ago and 
the contract was closed during the voyage 
over. Miss Victoria will l>e at liberty to 
return here around the latter part of Oc- 
tober, contracts binding her up to that 
time. If able to secure a. release she mav 
return in time for the season's opening. 



NO K. & E. SHUBERT ALLIANCE. 

There is no truth in the rumors that 
there are negotiations under way for a 
combination between the Klaw & Erlanger 
syndicate and the Shubert-Belasco-Fiske 
alliance, according to a theatrical manager 
in a position to know\ 

Several attempts have periodically been 
made to bring the two factions together, 
but at the present time there is no unusual 
effort in that direction, according to the 
same authority. 



HUGO MORRIS GOING ABROAD. 

On June J) Hugo Morris, a brother of 
William Morris, occupying a position 
of close business relationship to him also 
in the letter's booking office, will sail for 
J&urope. 



THE NEW YORK THEATRE. 

There is a prevailing impression that the 
New York Theatre will be added to the 
Keith list next season as a vaudeville 
house. 

The Keith people some time ago at- 
tempted ineffectually to start this rumor 
on the rounds, believed then to be for the 
purpose of gaining Hammerstein's Vic- 
toria for their own in the matter of book- 
ing. 

William Hammerstein when asked re- 
garding the possibility said : "It does not 
concern us at all. Mr. Keith could open a 
theatre next door to the Victoria and not 
draw one of our patrons into his house. 
He can not give the show we do. I doubt 
if any patron of the Victoria ever saw a 
Keith bill. Tf that happened, it was once 
only." 



EASTERN WHEEL LOSES SULLIVAN 
& KRAUS. 

Sullivan & Kraus with three burlesque 
theatres in New York City, removed those 
houses (Dewey, Gotham, Circle) from the 
Eastern to the Western Burlesque Wheel 
on May 20, leaving their former associates 
in the Eastern WTieel with no New York 
City theatre. 

Besides the houses mentioned the trans- 
action takes "The Moonlight Maids," a 
burlesque organization travelling under 
the name of Dave Kraus as manager. 

Whether Sullivan & Kraus have actu- 
ally joined the Empire Circuit is not 
known, nor will any one in possession of 
the facts make a statement to this effect. 
The information obtainable is that the 
houses credited to the firm have been 
leased to the Empire Circuit. 

Under an agreement thought to be iron- 
clad, Messrs. Sullivan & Kraus and all 
members of the Fastern Burlesque Wheel 
were bound unto each other under a for- 
feiture clause for non- fulfilment of con- 
tract. The damages in this ea-se would 
amount to about $80,(M)(| if the courts 
(where the Eastern people will carry the 
matter in an effort to restrain the Sulli- 
van & Kraus houses from playing the 
Western Wheel shows) decide that the 
transfer is valid. 

The transfer may have Ikjcu made by 
Sullivan k Kraus on the understanding 
that provided the courts interfered or any 
action was taken by the Eastern Wheel 
resulting in their disadvantage the trans- 
action would be void ami the former state 
of affairs prevail. 

The leases and title holders for the 
property and houses of Sullivan & Kraus 
are in the names of "dummies," and this 
will present a point for the legal ex- 
perts to decide, the contract with the 
Eastern Wheel having having been en- 
tered into by Sullivan & Krau* as a 
firm. 

The Eastern Wheel members are not- 
cast down over the loss. A member said 
this week: "We have all formed now 
into the Columbia Amusement Company 
and are not in fear that another member 
of the Wheel will desert. We shall be 
guided by legal advice in the fight we in- 
tend to make against Sullivan & Kraus. 
At present we are tied up through having 
no official information that they have left 
us. We can only wait until the season 
opens and present our shows at their 
houses. We meet next week for our 
annual route drawing. No New York 
time will be lost. We shall have three 
houses to play our shows in as before, if 
we are unsuccessful in restraining Sulli- 
van & Kraus. It is not advisable at this 
time to tell which three they will be." 



EASTERN WHEEL CLAIMS STAIR. 

It is claimed by the Eastern Burlesque 
Wheel that F. W. Stair, now a member 
of the Empire Circuit (Western Bur- 
lesque Wheel), With a burlesque theatre in 
Toronto, will l)e added to the Eastern list 
shortly. 

James Lowrie of the Empire Circuit de- 
nies that this will eventuate, stating that 
it is impossible for some reason which Mr. 
Lowrie would not state for Stair to leave 
them. Mr. Lowrie also denied the truth of 
the report that Drew and Campbell had any 
intention of leaving the Western Wheel. 



AN.IMPORTANT STEP TOWARD OR- 
y GANIZATION. 

"The Comedy dub" formed in the past 
ten days will undoubtedly develop into 
what will be a most important move to- 
ward the thorough organization of the 
vaudeville artists of America. 

As the name implies, the artists be- 
longing to the club will be composed of 
the comedy acts of vaudeville, and all the 
standard acts of that description will be 
invited to join. At the present writing 
about fifty have been enrolled as mem- 
bers, but until fairly founded the names 
will not be announced. 

Will M. Cressy has been chosen presi- 
dent and the membership list already car- 
ries the most prominent comedy acts in 
vaudeville. 

The objects of the club are not ag- 
gressive. It has been organized to place 
the most essential factors in vaudeville in 
a body where the strength of the organiza- 
tion could be thrown at any future time, 
either collectively or individually, into a 
larger body if that should be ultimately 
formed. 

Believing, as the organiser! do, that 
comedy rules vaudeville and that the busi- 
ness could not be successful without it, 
the club was inaugurated for the purpose 
of protection to its members. 

It will act as an incentive for the various 
other lines of endeavor in the vaudeville 
field to organize, enrolling themselves in 
some organization formed or to be formed 
for the mutual protection and self-preser- 
vation of the vaudeville artists as steadily 
advocated in Variety. 

Mr. Cressy, the president of the society, 
says regarding it: "I am not to be con- 
sidered the founder or originator of this 
society. The Comedy Club is an organ 
ization of the comedy players of vaude- 
ville. It is for the benefit and protection 
of members. For the gaining of an equi- 
table contract between the manager and 
the artist. Also for a better railroad rate. 
It is not to be composed of only 'head 
liners,' but 'comedy acts' solely. 

"No 'down with the managers' or 
'strikes.' It is strictly a mutual benefit 
scheme. For our protection and the man- 
agers'. 

"There are many sides of a social, pro- 
tective and fraternal nature. Vaudeville 
to-day is a different proposition from fif- 
teen years ago. The artists are of a dif- 
ferent calibre. They are business people 
now, capable of doing business with busi- 
ness men in a businesslike way. No 'labor 
union' idea prevails. Any concession that 
may be won by a strike may be won with- 
out one. 

"Playing six days in one. theatre and 
then paying carfare and baggage trans- 
portation to give a gratuitous perform- 
ance in another is not right and is going 
to result in trouble. Cancelling acts on 
Fridays and Saturdays before the follow- 
ing opening Monday is another wrong to 
right. 

"It can all be remedied in fifteen min- 
utes by proper representatives, without 
trouble or strike, when a reliable organ- 
ization is had. 

"The Comedy Club is here. It is mighty 
good and I'm 'for it.'" 



"Joe" Pincus is now with Jack Levy. 



WANTS NAT GOODWIN. 

A message was received this week from 
Ixmdon authorizing a New York agent to 
secure, if possible, Nat Goodwin for the 
\/>\\ Fields company. 



VARIETY 



WRIETY 

▲ Tarl«*r Paper for Tarlaty Faople. 

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THB VA1I9TT PDBLIflHINO CO. 

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Telephone 1887— 88th St. 

■XMZ J. IXLYXEMA*, 
■dltor and Proprietor. 



Entered ae 9eoond-chu$ matter December 
22, 1000, at Me poet office at New York, N. Y., 
under the act of Oongree$ of March 8, 1870. 



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Copyright 1806 by Variety Pabllehlng Oo. 
Vol U. No, 12. 



VARIETY announces "fairness" as the 
policy governing it. 

It is conducted on original lines for a 
theatrical newspaper. Whatever there is 
to be printed of interest to the profes- 
' sional world will be printed without re- 
gard to whose name is mentioned or the 
advertising column*, 

"All the news all the time" and "ab- 
solutely fair" are the watchwords. 

The reviews are written in a strictly 
impartial mannei snd for the benefit of 
the artists. 

VARIETY is an artist's paper, for the 
srtists and to which any artist may come 
with a just grievance. 

VARIETY will not burden its columns 
with "wash" notices; it will not be in- 
fluenced by advertising; it will be honest 
from the first page to the last. 



A new act is in preparation by Frank 
Manning and Harry J. Kooper, the German 
comedians. 



James and Sadie Leonard with Richard 
Anderson will have a new act soon, giving 
it to vaudeville. 



Frank Macnaghton, of the English 
vaudeville circuit of that name, sailed 
yesterday for home. 



Julio Ring will open on the Keith Cir- 
cuit on June 11, after having finished play- 
ing the Western time. 



Mooney and Holl>ein made an instant 
success at the Tivoli in Cape Town on their 
first appearance there lately. 



A new Oressy sketch will be produced 
by William H. Macart on June 18 at 
Proctor's Twenty-third Street. It is en- 
titled "The Man from Macy's" and is the 
latest Will M. Cressy, the author, has 
written. 




VARIETY'S LETTER BOX. 






fl VARIETY* will establish a •* Letter Box" column for 
the benefit of 

All Variety Artists* 

Cj| Mail may be forwarded in its care at New York or 
Chicago. 

CJ Special attention will be given to the prompt trans- 
mission of matter received, and an accurate list printed 
each week where address can not be immediately located. 




The Ellis-Nowlan Trio, without any inti- 
mation, failed to appear at Hammerstein's 
on Manday. The Three Wiltons filled in. 



Lea Brunins left for home May 31, 
They will fill time in Paris, returning later. 
Al. S. Bentham is booking their time next 
season. 



London has taken a great liking to El- 
tinge in his female characters. The Eng- 
lish papers just at hand say "he's differ- 
ent." 



Nina Collins lias been engaged for next 
season to take the part in "Bankers and 
Brokers" played the season just past by 
Rita Redmond. 



Two new sketches will be in readiness 
for Edgar Bixley when he opens at Proc- 
tor's on June 18. Both will be shown be- 
fore leaving New York. 



Abe Leavitt, the burlesque manager, 
and his wife Charlotte, known as Lottie 
Elliott, have been divorced by the Supreme 
Court in New York City. 



The Majestic Theatre, Erie, Pa., recent- 
ly purchased by the Sullivan-Considine 
combination, opens August 15, with James 
Fen more Lee as resident .manager. 



Harry A. Bailey, treasurer of the Co- 
lonial Theatre at Lawrence, Mass., was 
in New York last week. Mr. Bailey came 
on to complete his plans for next season. 



Blood poisoning has annoyed Irving 
Cooper of the Empire City Quartet since 
playing at Poli's, Worcester, where he con- 
tracted it through contact with a "drop." 



H. H. Feiber, the Keith foreign booking 
agent, will leave for the other side pres- 
ently. Paul Durand will be in charge of 
Mr. Feiber'a desk at the Keith Booking 
Agency until he returns. 



Through illness, Louise Beaton, late 
star of "Rachel Goldstein" and wife of 
Al IT. Woods, cancelled the time given for 
her new acts at Proctor's Newark and 
Twenty-third Street. She was to have ap 
peered In Newark this week, but will do so 
later. 



The Brooks Brothers dissolved partner- 
ship May 28. Sam Brooks will have for a 
new partner his wife, Rose Jeanette. 



A benefit was tendered to Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry F. Dixie at Wilmington, Del., on 
Wednesday of this week. Mr. Dixie, who 
Wiw an artist in his younger days, is now 
blind, besides being afflicted with loco- 
motor ataxia. 



Cressy and Dayne, after closing the sea- 
son and taking Ryan and Richfield home 
in the Cressy "machine," will continue the 
auto trip to their own summer place in 
New Hampshire, a distance of two hun- 
dred miles. 



Hope Booth was quite wroth early in the 
week because the Empire City Quartet was 
billed above her at Hammerstein's, where 
both appear this week. Miss Booth re- 
marked that she could not understand it. 
No one would explain. 



The Columbia Theatre in Boston will 
have as its manager this summer Louis 
Harris, the manager for "Yankee Doodles." 
Mr. Harris will take the show out again 
next season. It is a burlesque combina- 
tion of T. W. Dinkins. 



Two of Proctor's city houses, Fifty- 
eighth "Street and the Fifth Avenue, will 
<*lose to-morrow. Twenty-third Street and 
125th Street will remain open during the 
summer. The theatres in Newark, Troy 
and Albany under the management may 
also keep open house. 



Roland West v* ill play Hurtig & Sea- 
mon's Harlem music hall with "The Crimi- 
nal"' week of June 4. This is the first 
week's engagement in the city of the pro- 
tean offering. 



Horace Goldin will sail for Europe at 
the close of his engagement at Keith's 
Theatre, Boston, in four weeks. Goldin 
has two years* booking in the music halls 
of Europe, which he says he must fill be- 
fore returning again to the United 
.States. 



For the closing week of the Alhambra 
in Harlem the Fays (John T. and Anna) 
will be the attraction. June 10 will be 
the last day of the vaudeville season, the 
Monday following finding the Al>orn Opera 
Company in "Robin Hood" in possession 
of the stage. 



.Joe Welch will not go out in "The 
Blacksmith" next season. The anvil play 
was written by Dick Staley, of Staley 



and Birbeck. Welch will either play 
vaudeville dates or at Lew Fields' Herald 
Square Theatre as a member of the 
Fields company. 



"Parson" Davies, the pugilistic promoter 
and sometime theatrical manager, with 
headquarters in the West, will appear in 
a monologue around here if time can be 
secured. "The Parson" received hut minis- 
terial title from a sanctimonious manner of 
dressing and looks. 



No vacation will be taken this summer 
by Ed M. Markum, the artists' press repre- 
sentative. Mr. Markum says he expects to 
SO busy. It is the first time in four years 
that work threatened to crowd him ao 
closely during the hot weather that he had 
to remain in New York to dodge it. 



William B. Watson, manager of "The 
Oriental Burlesquers" and "The Washing- 
ton Society Girls," is preparing two new 
shows to be sent over the Empire Circuit 
next season. He will employ ten come- 
dians and twenty-five girls in each organi- 
sation, as well as several European novelty 
acts. 



Jeanette Dupre has been signed by T. W. 
Dinkins to play with his summer stock 
burlesque at the Columbia Theatre, Bos- 
ton. Bookings are completed or nearly so 
for Mr. Dinkins' other summer stock or- 
ganizations at the Lafayette, Buffalo; the 
Bijou* Philadelphia, and the Lyceum, 
Washington. 



Collins and Brown closed after thirty- 
nine weeks with the "High Rollers" bur- 
lesque company at the Gaiety, Brooklyn, 
Sunday. The pair will go into vaudeville, 
appearing August 13 at the Lancaster 
Roof Garden. The vaudeville offering will 
be a German comedy sketch called "An 
Affair of Honor." 



'Hie statement was made in the Keith 
Booking Agency's offices during the week 
that it takes three hours at the present 
time to lay out a route, and that there 
were 4,000 vaudeville acts waiting to be 
booked. The first part is believable, but 
the number of acts have probably been 
■ ■minted with a magnifying glass. 



The Chadwick Trio left this week on a 
seven week tour of the Jake Wells South- 
ern park circuit. After filling that time 
they will go for six weeks on the J. K. 
Burk circuit in Ohio. On September 3 
they will be seen in a new sketch to suc- 
ceed "Hank Hoover's Holiday." The new 
offering is by (Tiarles Horwitz. 



Melville Stoltz, the amusement promoter, 
is l>eing "gunned" for by a downtown broker 
named 1/niis Schwartz. Mr. Stoltz induced 
Mr. Schwartz to invest in what was going 
to bo an amusement device called "Shoot 
tne chicken and get the egg." The broker 
refuses to see the joke, it having cost him 
about $460 and he wants it back. 



llolcomb, Curtis and company is the 
way the company playing "A Winter 
Session'' is being billed now. It was Hoi- 
cornb, Curtis and Webb, but Margaret 
Webb is mi longer with the Holcomb out- 
lit. She will pla . |»aik ilatcs for the pres- 
ent in A single turn. Mr. Holcomb will 
have b new sketch next season. 



VARIETY 



Why the Vaudeville Artists 

o! America Should Organize 



BY SIME. 



The predominant fear with B. F. Keith 
at the present moment is the thorough or- 
ganization of the vaudeville artists. 

While Keith and his associates are con- 
cerned regarding absolute control, they 
are worried lest the artists should not 
stand divided until that happens. 

The actions and movements of the White 
Rats are being followed closely. If a pos- 
sible bar in any way, underhanded or other- 
wise, may be found to frustrate the con- 
templated taking in of all reputable art- 
iste by that society, Keith will use it. 

The managers connected with the West- 
ern Vaudeville Association are in the same 
state of mind. They realize the danger 
to their sway through the artists being 
leagued together in a representative body. 

Keith, particularly through EL F. Albee, 
is scheming and figuring out plans to 
soothe the artists until organization will 
be practically rendered useless through de- 
lay. The Keith office is causing reports 
to be spread that no salaries will be cut; 
that only "gold bricks" will be affected by 
the consolidation, but an admission is made 
that there are any number of acts receiv- 
ing from $150 to $200 weekly that should 
have the salary reduced to the price re- 
ceived 'before legitimate competition raised 
it. 

Another device by Keith to allay alarm 
is to book an act at the present time for 
the price demanded, thereby having the 
artist receiving the contract act as an ad- 
vertisement for the Keith office by report- 
ing the engagement. 

The Keith Booking Agency is admittedly 
not managed by fools. Neither would any 
one interested in that Office attempt any 
radical measures at this time. It would 
be foolhardy just now for the Keith 
Agency to take a step causing the artists 
uneasiness. With Keith the master, how- 
ever, it need not necessarily be next sea- 
son when the artist will be made to feel 
his power; the season following would be 
ample time. 

To forestall any drastic action at any 
date by any manager, the artists must pre- 
pare themselves. That may only be done 
by getting together. 

Organization at the present does not 
mean "strike." There is now nothing of 
sufficient seriousness to "strike" for. 

Whether Keith secures positive control, 
or whether a vaudeville "war" goes on, or- 
ganization is required. The remedy for 
the artists in any event lies with them- 
selves. They as a body become the key- 
note to a situation of any complexion. 

The Keith principles have been too well 
exploited in the past to be contradicted 
now. It has been the .steady cry of the 
Keith employees that artists were over- 
paid. What they said was the reflection 
of the views of B. F. Keith and E. F. 
Albee. 

There is enough justification for immedi- 
ate organization in the booking system 
now in vogue at the Keith office. 

Disclaiming the appellation of "agent," 
Keith calmly charges artists booking 
through his office for his own circuit five 
per cent on all contracts, and the man- 
agers a certain amount weekly for supply- 



ing bills, receiving a commission from both 
ends. 

The theatres are built and have a stated 
capacity. No more money can be made 
from the "front" of the house, unless the 
prices of admission are raise*!. More profit 
must come from the "back," and the art- 
ists must pay it, according to Keith. 

The Keith Booking Agency advertises 
thirty-seven actual vaudeville theatres as 
booked by it. Accepting that as a basis 
the Keith office is in receipt of an income 
of from between $175,000 and $200,000 
yearly, contributed solely by artists play- 
ing in what are known as "Keith houses." 

Not alone does it resolve itself into the 
artists working for less than the contract 
price for Keith, but this money goes to- 
ward the running expenses of the theatres. 
The cost of operating the Keith office may 
be $60,000 per annum. The balance is the 
Keith profit. Keith lias never reduced 
the rate of commission to an amount re- 
quired simply to pay office expenses. It 
is even a Keith regret that there must be 
a "split" with some agents. 

Were it possible for Keith to have the 
vaudeville dictation, and cut the salaries 
of artists, it would mean a saving to the 
managers of $1,000,000 every full season. 

The artist will pay it all if caught un- 
awares. Organization can prevent it, for 
that if properly done will present a solid 
wall against which no manager will care 
to run. 

The summer time is a good season for 
this. When accomplished an international 
alliance may be formed with the foreign 
artists' societies and the managers can 
then fume, fret and worry over them- 
selves, each other or their possessions, 
but the artists will rest in peace, know- 
ing their interests can not be greatly af- 
fected through the union from whence will 
come the strength that will compel the 
respectful attitude of the magnate. 



New York, May 28. 
Kditor Variety: 

Sir — There have been so many changes 
in the situation during the past ten days 
that from a managerial standpoint the 
condition is getting to be one of solidity. 

The combined organization of the vari- 
ous managers is the best answer to the in- 
quiry, "Why should artists organize?" 

The "White Rats of America" is good as 
far as it goes. Four years ago they had 
a powerful association, and would have 
gained every contested point, but lacked 
the strong protecting power of affiliation 
with the other professions employed in the 
theatres, with the musicians, stage hands, 
electricians, calcium light operators. The 
combination of these forces would com- 
mand the respect they would be entitled 
to. Let the "White Rats of America" or- 
ganize; let the "Actors' Society of Amer- 
ica" organize, and if they will use judg- 
ment, putting false pride to one side, they 
will be masters of the situation. It is 
about time that artists combined business 
instinct with desire for artistic success. 

Harry De Veaux, 
National President, Actors' National Pro- 
tective Union of America. 



LUESCHER LEAVES SUNDAY. 

As reported in Variety last week, Mark 
Luescher has resigned his position on the 
staff of F. F, Proctor and will leave to- 
morrow (Sunday) night. 

Mr. Luescher says he will take a rest 
for awhile, leaving for Europe about 
July 1. His trip abroad if made may 
carry with it some undisclosed important 
mission bearing on vaudeville. 

Mr. Luescher resigned of his own vo- 
lition. Mr. Proctor was opposed to his 
decision to leave, "but had no alternative. 

The Proctor business grew wonderfully 
under the Luescher direction. The 
Twenty -third Street house was badly run 
down when Luescher took charge, after 
bolstering up the stock companies. His 
policy ' was feature acts, and following 
that up the vaudeville theatres on the 
Proctor circuit were given a new lease of 
life. The bills given equalled the best, 
Mr. Luescher introduced many big acts 
for the first time in the Proctor houses. 
Many of those he succeeded in bringing 
into vaudeville are now on the Keith cir- 
cuit. 



sultation with him, and that he will posi- 
tively take steps to prevent the English- 
man's appearance under any management 
over here excepting his own during the 
term of the Hackett-Welford agreement. 



KELLER WILL SUCCEED LUESCHER. 

Following the resignation of Mark 
Luescher from the Proctor staff the re- 
port again crops up that E. S. Keller, of 
Myers & Keller, will become the Proctor 
representative in the Keith Booking 
Agency. 



WILLIAMS WANTED TO KNOW. 

A meeting of managers, among whom 
Percy G. Williams was the only one not 
in the Keith combine, informally held the 
past week had its conversation brought 
to the point where Williams was asked if 
he would come into the Keith Agency. 

Mr. Williams asked what benefit he 
would derive from such an association. 
The advantageous features as they ap- 
pear to a Keith mind were carefully gone 
into and elaborated upon in detail until 
Mr. Williams asked about his share of 
commissions. 

He was at once informed that there 
would be no such item as "his share" 
and after sharply remarking that he 
could not "see" Keith under those cir- 
cumstances, Williams abruptly left the 
gathering. 



STEINER GOING AWAY. 

If the proposed arrangements between 
Al Sutherland and Alex. Steiner, the 
vaudeville agents, go through, Mr. Steiner 
will spend about six months each year at 
the Wintergarten, Berlin, of which his 
brother is maniger. 

The two agents will work in harmony, 
recommending acts for home and foreign 
use. 



MAY RESTRAIN "HOPPY." 

Dallas Welford, the "Mr. Hopkinson" of 
the comedy by that title, may not play 
the single week in vaudeville he has been 
engaged for at Proctor's Twenty- third 
Street commencing June 11. 

Al Sutherland, the agent, says that Mr. 
Welford will, but James K. Hackett, to 
whom the English comedian is under con- 
tract, is of the opinion that his prior con- 
tract will ha.ve first say, and he will not 
allow the Proctor date to be kept. 

Mr. Hackett declares that Welford ac- 
cepted the vaudeville time without con- 



GOLDEN DECLINES NOMINATION. 

At the White Rats' meeting held last 
Sunday Gecrge Fuller Golden declined the 
nomination tendered him for the presi- 
dency of the society. Mr. Golden said 
that, owing to the present condition of his 
health, he did not feel that he cared to 
assume the duties of the office, retiring in 
favor of R. C. Mudge, one of the nominees 
and the only one who has accepted. The 
other candidate to be balloted tot, Fred 
Niblo, is in Europe and has not been heard 
from. 

The election of officers will occur on 
Sunday, June 17. On the following Thurs- 
day, June 21, will occur the first regular 
Thursday night meeting, the White Rats 
having voted to hold meetings on that even- 
ing on and after that date. 



THE NEW KEITH SYSTEM. 

The meeting of the managers booking 
through the Keith Agency this week will 
probably result in a system being adopted 
by the Keith Booking Agency in order 
that the acts for houses may be placed by 
one person continuously. 

The houses will be arranged in three or 
more classes, indentified by letters. Each 
will denote the maximum amount allowed 
for a bill, such as "A" may mean $2,600. 

All houses coming under one heading 
will thereafter come under one man's direc- 
tion. 



NEW FIRM BEGINS JUNE 4. 

On Monday next the new firm or cor- 
poration of Keith-Proctor goes into ef- 
fect. 

On that day the Keith and Proctor 
houses which were pooled will come under 
the joint management. 

Several changes are expected to follow 
in the Proctor houses. The theatres in the 
deal are Proctor's Newark, Twenty-third 
and Fifty-eighth Streets, Keith's Union 
Square and Bijou (Jersey City). 



REIS QUITS VAUDEVILE. 

Vaudeville is an illusion for a legitimate 
manager according to M. Reis, who has had 
a season or two of the brand in his circuit 
of playhouses throughout New York, Penn- 
sylvania and Ohio. 

Following out his belief, Mr. Reis will 
discontinue his theatres at Erie, Carbon- 
dale and Pottsville, Pa., for vaudeville, 
leaving the town open to the cheaper 
vaudeville circuits. 

In Elmira, N. Y., however, there will be 
a Reis vaudeville house, he having acquired 
the Auditorium Theatre. There is nothing 
else that may be done with it. 



TILLEY BREAKS ALHAMBRA'S 
RECORD. 

At the Alhambra Theatre in Harlem 
this week will be the record one in re- 
ceipts for the house since its opening. 

Vesta Tilley is the attraction. 

It had been practically understood by 
those curious to know that the Alhambra 
Theatre should be the test of the re- 
spective drawing powers of Miss Tilley 
and Vesta Victoria who played the house 
twice earlier in the season. 






VARIETY 



LEO CARRILLO'S CARTOON OF THE WEEK. 




WOULDN'T ACCEPT ALBEE'S TERMS. 

Following the conference of a week ago 
of the remaining managers booking through 
Morris' office, other than Williams and 
Hammerstein, meetings have been had 
during the week between Weber & Rush 
and VVilmer & Vincent, representing those 
managers who control fifteen houses, and 
K. P. Albee, general manager for B. F. 
Keith. 

It was found that there was a decided 
difference of opinion. Mr. Albee took the 
position that they should be pleased to 
Ik* taken id the Keith office upon any 
terms, not neglecting to mention the pos- 
sibility of 'opjK>sition," and citing the 
options held or which might be obtained 
in (owns wherr the outside managers' thea- 
tres wore located. Tie demanded $25 
weekly from each. 

Hie representatives of the managers 
retorted that "opposition" to them was 
meaningless, as their cities did not ad- 
mit of that through size, and if they 
were to go into the Keith office it would 
be with the agreement that they were to 
participate in the profits accruing from 
the commission charged on bookings for 
their bills, amounting, it was estimated, 
to about $4. r ),000 gross yearly. 

Neither side is willing to concede a 
|K)int, All>ee having been temporarily 
stunned by what he considered the au- 
dacity of the proposition. 



HAS WILLIAMS SET A PRICE? 

It has been rumored during the week 
that Percy G. Williams was asked for a 
figure necessary to secure the control of 
the capital stock of the Orpheum Theatre 
Company, which he represents in the 
capacity of president, and owning the 
circuit known as the "Williams houses." 

The same rumor says that Mr. Will- 
iams set a figure, now under consideration 
by the other side. In other quarters it 
is said that the profits of the Williams 
houses have been of such magnitude that 
his price made would be prohibitive. 



AGENTS WORRIED. 
Several vaudeville agents are becoming 
anxious over the outlook for their future 
prosperity in that capacity. In one or two 
instances plana arc being formed for other 
connections, the general opinion among 
those so pessimistically inclined being that 
there is no longer a future for the vaude- 
ville agent, excepting those favored. 



KEITH PROSPECTING. 

Easton, Pa., June 1. 
B. F. Keith has been in town looking 
over the ground. The Lyric Theatre, now- 
closed, was discussed as a likely proposi- 
tion. If the owner ot the building will 
make the desired alterations it is likely 
that another Keith vaudeville house will 
be added to the circuit. 



NEW PARK FOR ATLANTA. 

Atlanta. (la., June 1. 
Ponce de Leon* the Atlanta amusement 
resort, will have a rival next summer if 
the plans of James L. (Jlass mature. Mr. 
Glass arrived here this week from Mem* 
phis, Tenn., where he has just completed 
Fairyland Park. The promoter of the new 
park has secured for a term of years a plot 
of eighteen acres. Work will l>c com- 
menced within thirty days, said Mr. Glass, 
and the resort will be completed, even to 
a summer theatre with seating capacity 
fi»r 1,(500. in time to open early next sea- 
son. The theatre will he devoted to vaude- 
ville. Associated with Mr. Glass will be 
Thomas A. la \ lor and the National 
Amusement ( nmpany, of Toledo, Ohio. 



PAPERS SIGNED. 

It was confidently stated yesterday 
(Friday) that the papers bringing the 
Keith-Proctor- Western Vaudeville Asso- 
ciation in one joint partnership had been 
signed. 



TENT VAUDEVILLE IN BRONX. 

G. P. Dunbar will give vaudeville under 
canvas in the Bronx commencing July 0. 
A tent will be erected with a seating ca- 
pacity of 1,500. Eschert & Sutherland will 
book for the "summer snap." 



TIVOLI CHANGES MANAGERS. 

There has been a change of manage- 
ment at the Tivoli in Cape Town, South 
Africa. 

Ed Pickering is again in charge after 
an absence of eighteen months. 

Herbert Hyman, son of the proprietor, 
Edgar Hyman, was placed in the execu- 
tive position when Mr. Pickering received 
his first moving orders, but the change 
proved so unsatisfactory that the former 
condition of affairs was resumed. 

It is said here that the many adverse re- 
ports coming from the South African halls 
were brought al>out through the son's con- 
duct of the place. 



KEITH MAY GET EMPIRE CIRCUIT. 

'Hie Empire Circuit (Western Burlesque 
Wheel) may place its bookings with the 
Keith Booking Agency. There is no au- 
thenticated foundation for the statement, 
but it has been repeated with much posi- 
tivenesa since the Empire's acquisition of 
of Sullivan & Kraus. 

The connection is figured through the 
political friendship of A. L. Erlanger, of 
Klaw & Erlanger, now very much inter- 
ested in the Keith ollice, and "Big Tim 
Sullivan, the local politician and a mem 
her of the Sullivan & Kraus firm. 



it 



The vaudeville season at Electric Park. 
Albany, N. Y., commences June 11. 



VARIETY 




Ned Wayburn's Attractions. 
"Daisy-land." 
Twenty-third Street. 

Ab the second of the Way burn attrac- 
tions "Daisy-land" makes its metropoli- 
tan debut this week at the Twenty-third 
Street Theatre. Termed a 'fairy sym- 
phonette," it is a s|>eetacular "girl act," 
led by Dorothy .Jardon, who has eight 
young women for assistants. There arc 
three scenes and four songs. As an in- 
troductory to each musical number Miss 
Jardon gives a humorous recitation. The 
scenes are laid respectively in Mexico, 
.Japan and "Daisy-land." Special settings 
are carried for each, and the landscape 
from Mexico to Japan is transformed by 
the raising of a drop. The dependence is 
the finale "Daisy -land," which, when re- 
vealed, displays a daisy field bordering 
upon a small sheet of water, with a wood- 
land in the distance. It is pretty, made 
more so by the harmonized costumes. 
Lights heighten the effect and there are 
other devices drawing the applause. Lit- 
tle fencing is indulged in. A short step 
is given for the exit of the last scene, and 
in this Miss Jardon is graceful, apparently 
gliding off the stage. She is the only 
possessor of a voice also. The chorus vo- 
cally is weak, woefully so. Two forma- 
tions are shown, new in design, one in the 
Japanese scene and another in "Daisy- 
land." The music throughout is catchy 
and a number of encores were received. It 
is a pleasing act. 



NEW AGTS OP THE WEEK 




Charles Leonard Fletcher. 
"A Breeze From the West." 
Fifty-eighth Street. 

In his new comedy playlet Mr. FUtcher 
gets far away from his character change 
act The plot of "A Breeze from the West" 
may be summarized something like this: 
Colonel Breeze, a Western gambler, takes 
passage on the steamship Mystic in pursuit 
of a widow, Mrs. Redway (May Purcell). 
Recovering from a siege of seasickness as 
a nor'easter is brewing, he discloses himself 
to the object of his affection. The storm 
breaks, the ship sinks and the gambler 
saves the widow's life, the inference being 
that he wins her hand in the process. The 
unfolding of this story involves a quantity 
of mechanical apparatus for a dark change. 
The change from shipboard to a rescue 
scene in the open sea was l>adly worked by 
ihe stage crew on Monday night. Properly 
done, the idea would work out as a splen- 
did finish, but the wretched handling of the 
lights Monday evening left the stage in 
semi -darkness and Mr. Fletcher, plainly 
visible in his white shirt against the dark 
background, could be seen taking his posi- 
tion in the "raging waters." The early 
dialogue has many bright points and 
caught a good average of laughs, but will 
stand pruning. When experience has 
taught the proper handling of the heavy 
setting of the act it should go well. Mr. 
Fletcher was supported by Ray Purcell, 
Joseph Merrick, William Stafford, Albert 
Linde and Lewis Sargent. Rush. 



V 



Trixie Friganza. 
Songs and Imitations. 
Hammerstein's. 

For the first time anywhere Trixie Fri- 
ganza appears in vaudeville at Ilnintner- 
stein's thus week. Miss Frifahxa comes 
under the heading of "name" acts, having 
played with the Joe \Vel>er stock company 
it the Broadway music ball and built upon 



her local reputation thereby. In the imita- 
tions Miss Friganza did, the most pro- 
nounced and important of which Avas that 
of Marie Dressier, there is nothing dis- 
cernible showing a studied effort in 
preparation. She has two number*, the 
iirst being a song, with variations r and 
the other the Dressier impersonation. This 
is so well done, Miss Friganza having had 
the advantage of close and continued ob- 
bcrvatiou of the original, Unit it received 
.several encores on Wednesday night, a 
short recitation being thrown at the audi- 
ence as a solace for their applause. There 
is no reason why Miss Friganza, with a 
well laid out offering, should not become a 
valuable attraction in vaudeville. She 
has the requisites otherwise. With her 
present material it will be a gamble. 

Simc. 




Claude Gillingwater. 
"A Strenuous Proposal." 
Keith's. 

Almost direct from the— legitimate, 
Claude Gillingwater is appearing at Keith's 
this week with "A Strenuous Proposal," 
written by himself. The sketch has been 
built for comedy puqioses only, with a 
dash of sentiment thrown in. The plot is 
novel-born, involving some love and an 
immense amount of money, bringing into 
the action a rough Western character. 
Plenty of slang is added, the favored ex- 
pression l>eing "mut," and it sounds as 
badly on the stage as it reads. There are 
six persons listed in the cast, Mr. Gilling- 
water standing out clear and distinct. 
With a well-modulated and resonant voice 
he attracts the audience to him, holding 
it in all situations. Plenty of forced 
laughter is secured. No natural humor 
either in the dialogue or the action makes 
itself evident, an ini|>ersonation of a 
drunken man terrifying a woman supply- 
ing what fun there is. Carlyn Strelitz as 
a brother idolater is poorly cast, but on 
Tuesday night was fortunate in having 
numerous friends present. Edith Hinkie 
gave an excellent version of a woman 
swayed by conflicting emotions, senti- 
mental and mercenary, but lacked convic- 
tion in looks. Richard Clarke as the but- 
ler played quietly to good effect, while 
the others were merely figures. Mr. Gil 
lingwater remains the star on the billing 
and in the act, his training in the legitimate 
standing him in good stead in a playlet of 
this nature. The finale is theatrical, but 
three curtain calls were given and it is a 
fairly successful comedy offering. 

Simc. 



Hayes and Johnson. 

"A Dream of Baby Days/' 

Hurtig & Seamon's. \ 

Catherine Haves and Sabel .lohnson se- 
lected Hurtig iS: Seamon's for the occa- 
sion of their New York showing of the 
new sketch "A Dream of Baby l>avs," in 
which they are appearing together for the 
lii-t time in vaudeville. Miss Johnson 
has been a single entertainer before this, 
while Miss Haves, her sister, came over 
from the legitimate. The novelty of the 
offering, a biographical "chasing" picture, 
with the sisters dressed us children in it. 

doel not arrive until well toward the 



linish. The Misses Hayes and Johnson fol 
low the pictures on the stage in similar 
costumes, Miss Johnson as a boy and Miss 
Hayes as a girl. Prior to this there is 
some talk and soiujs, including an imita- 
tion of Stella May hew. The humor of 
the act lies in the size and weight of the 
principal*. They slightly refer to their 
builds during the piece, but not enough. 
There is a chance for lots of laughs if thev 
are nut *>ensitive in this regard. The 
children's costumes should be donned 
earlier, bringing the act to the laughing 
point at the quickest moment, and the 
comedy in talk, actions and songs to fol- 
low. Although unusually large for stage 
people, both women dress well, and are 
extremely good-looking, with much per- 
sonality. A big comedy act may be built 
up from this. It closely approaches one 
as it is. Sime. 




Willie Weston. 
Impersonator. 
Fifty-eighth Street. 

Willie Weston appears to be still in the 
early twenties, but there is no indication 
of youthfulness in his performance. Wes- 
ton has the gift of "holding the mirror." 
His impersonations are clean cut and con- 
vincing in all the particulars of singing and 
talking voice, gestures and carriage. He 
does three imitations, those of George M. 
Cohan, Bert Williams and Cliff Gordon. 
The Cohan impersonation has been done to 
death, and Weston's is not the best that 
has been seen. His other two, particularly 
that of Williams, are much better With 
such conspicuous ability in mimicry, Wes- 
ton should get to his impersonations 
sooner. He could do this by leaving out 
one of the two songs which he sings in his 
own proper person. The Monday night au- 
dience demanded another impersonation, 
but [Missed the songs up with only casual 
applause. Rush. 

Sharp Brothers. 
Songs and Dances. 
Twenty-third Street 

Since leaving fiddle Leonard, with whom 
they appeared for some time in vaudeville, 
the Sharp brothers now constitute an act 
alone. The boys sing two songs, dancing 
in hard and soff shoes. Several new steps 
are shown, and for a linish a protracted 
dance is given by both without the assist- 
ance of the orchestra. The rythm is per- 
fectly kept. It is an effective finale. 'Hie 
audience liked the brothers exceedingly 
well. »S'tmc. 

William F. Hawtrey and Company. 
"The Handsome Cabman." 
Hurtig & Seamon's. 

William F. Hawtrey is assisted by May 
Tally (or Tully) and John S. Robertson 
in "A Handsome Cabman," produced for 
the first time this week at Hurtig & Sea- 
mon's. The playlet is by Brandon Hurst, 
and there is an air of a boost greatness 
about the east. Mr. Hawtrev beinff the 
brother of Charles Hawtrev. the English 
comedian, while Mr. Robertson is believed 
to bear the same relationship to Forbes 
Robertson. Mis* Tally was the support 
of .lames .1. Corbett until recently. Tin' 
greatne** ends there, however. The sketch 



docs the execution. It is talky, draggy, 
with little or no action and none of that 
of a humorous brand. The story is farci- 
cal, but poorly put together. All tlve 
comedy is under a dress frame, where the 
husband hides to spy upon his wife. No 
one player gave a creditable performance. 
Miss Tally had opportunity for her voice, 
an unusually fine one, while Mr. Hawtrey 
gave a heaviness to the comedy passages 
that removed them from that distinction. 
Mr. Robertson was quite impossible, Vibe 
sketch will never do. &hnc. 




Harry Evans. 

Songs. 

Keith's. 

Having acquired some fame as the pro- 
tege of John D. Ivockefeller, Harry Evans 
is now in vaudeville, having lost his Stand- 
ard Oil job. He appears to be a young 
boy. His voice, billed as a "phenomenal 
soprano," is about the same as the ordi- 
nary choir singer of that age and sex. 
The only matter of comment is his rather 
wide range. Three songs were sung, but 
young Mr. Evans suffered the disadvantage 
of having the piano alone for accompanist. 
He is dressed neatly and seems at ease, 
although his hands are a trouble to him. 
He was applauded liberally. 

Sime. 



OUT or TOW 



OVUM 



Ritter and Foster. 

Trocadero. 

Philadelphia. 

Max Ritter, familiar as a singer of 
"coon" songs, and Grace Foster, who 
played with the "Casino Girls" during the 
past season, tried out their singing and 
dancing turn this week for the first time 
and, while crude in detail, the pair proved 
the mainstay of the bill. The weak spot 
was the opening number. This introduc- 
tion is unfitted and the act could be 
strengthened considerably by opening 
with some lively number. Both had good 
songs to follow and sang well. They did 
as well as could \be expect ed for the first 
trial, and promise to improve when they 
wear off the rough edges. Kinks. 



RIGO ON THE BOWERY. 

The Atlantic Gardens on the Bowery 
may have Kigo, the Hungarian violinist, 
and his orchestra, if Charles EschertV* 
faith in the proposition does not fade. Mr. 
Eacheii books for the Bowery resort and 
has made Rigo an ofTer. 

The foreign population in that neighbor' 
hood would like to hear the gypsy leader, 
Mr. Eschert thinks. 



LASKY & ROLFE'S NOVELTY. 

An enlarged phonograph called "The 
linmensephone" is now in course of con- 
struction by Laskv & RoJfe for vaudeville 
production. It will have a volume of 
sound furnished by eight men, but through 
the megaphone shape in construction will 
equal the power of forty pairs of lungs on 
an ordinary instrument. 

IRENE BENTLEY PLAYING PARKS. 

f>H June 11 at Electric Park. Baltimore, 
Irene Bent ley will reappear preliminary 

to a tour of all vaudeville circuits if turns 
is secured. 



VARIETY 



POSSIBLE HOUSES FOR EASTERN 
WHEEL. 

In the event that the 'Eastern Bur- 
lesque Wheel is obliged to seek New 
York houses to present its shows in next 
season, owing to the loss of the Dewey, 
Circle and Gotham theatres, taken out of 
its circuit by Sullivan & Kraus' jump 
into the Western Wheel, it is thought 
that Hurtig & Scainon, members of the 
Columbia Amusement Company, an inte- 
gral part of the Eastern, will turn their 
music hall on 125th street and Yorkville 
theatre on the East Side over for the 
purposes of their associates. 

Hurtig & Sea mon also have the 
Metropolis Theatre in the Bronx under 
lease, but that house has not been figured 
upon as a possible "Eastern" burlesque 
adjunct. 

The Grand street theatre, now giving 
vaudeville, may be secured, as the location 
near the Bowery and the proximity to 
the Western Wheel houses in that neigh- 
borhood might render it desirable. 



ARTISTS' FORUM 



— _. 



Confine your letters to 150 words and writ* on one aid* of paper only. 
Anonymous communications will not bo printed. Name of writer must be signed and will be 
held In strict confidence, If desired. 



Mew York, May 31. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir -In last week's review of Uammer- 
stein'f bill, commenting upon Byron and 
Ijangdon, you suggested that a couple of 
lines could be eliminated by me. Owing to 
the peculiar nature of the character 1 as- 
sume, "Hie Dude Detective," the impres- 
sion may obtain from that notice that the 
lines referred to might have been of a sug- 
gestive nature. Having always exercised 
diligence in this regard, and knowing you 
did not mean anything of the kind, will 
you kindly state so in your next issue in 
order that no wrong opinion may be had. 

I am quite sure the lines you thought 
could be dispensed with were about in- 
sects. Am I not right? 

Frank Byron, 
Of Byron and Langdon. 



BIG TESTIMONIAL FOR GOLDEN. 

On Juno 17 a huge testimonial for 
George Fuller Golden will be tendered the 
first "Big Chief" of the White Rats, prob- 
ably at the New York Theatre. The 
Casino Theatre was applied for. The 
Shuberts demanded $350 for the night. 
The New York may be donated by Klaw 
& Erlanger. 

Mr. Golden was in the city during the 
week, leaving Wednesday for Saranac 
Lake, N. Y., where he has been resting for 
some time past. He will return for the 
event, which has been arranged against 
his wishes.' 

The following have volunteered their 
services for the evening: Lillian Russell, 
Dave Warfield, George M. Cohan, Blanche 
Ring, Empire City Quartet, Eddie Foy, 
James J. Corbett, Fay Templeton, Ross 
and Fenton, Adele Ritchie, Cliffe Berzac, 
Tom Nawn, Andrew Mack and Grapewin 
si nd Chance. William Morris will be the 
stage manager. Other volunteers are be- 
ing added daily. 



A SOLUTION PERHAPS. 

What is at present an enigma to the 
vaudeville producer may be solved through 
Lasky, Rolfe & Co. 

The present conditions are so unfavor- 
able in immediate results that Jesse 
Lasky of the firm has decided to take 
their latest act, "The Black Hussars," 
over to the other side, time having been 
guaranteed him to the extent of thirty 
weeks at a profitable figure. 

While over there Mr. Lasky will cast 
around and decide whether it will be an 
object to launch new acts in Europe first. 
The price of labor abroad, much lower 
than here, is another advantage, and a 
successful act bearing the foreign hall 
mark of success will have a better chance 
of an American hearing than a home pro- 
duction, if no change in the present situ- 
ation arrives. 

The course of Lasky, Rolfe & Co. will 
lie closely watched by other producers. 



GOOD GIRLS. 

'Hie Ford sisters of the Four Fords have 
purchased a home at Bensonhurst for their 
mother. She travels with the dancing 
combination. All four are brothers and 
sisters in reality. The family is a dancing 
one. John Ford is another brother. 



[Mr. Byron is perfectly correct in his 
presumption that the article had no refer- 
ence to anything suggestive in his sketch. 
Nothing of the kind exists whatsoever in 
any manner, either in the action or the dia- 
logue. He is also right in judging that the 
remarks about elimination were intended 
to apply to the mention of certain small 
insects usually found where there is an un- 
tidy housewife. — Ed.] 



St. Joseph, Mo., May 24. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir — In the current number of Va- 
riety Bert Howard takes occasion to 
inform a Mr. McDonald as to who was 
the originator of comedy piano playing, 
and later he says that many have pur- 
loined his "originations in travesty piano 
playing." 

Will Mr. Howard kindly let us know 
what he means by "travesty piano play- 
ing"? John II. W. Hyrnc. 



San Francisco, May 25. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir — Enclosed find programme of the 
opening of the Orpheum. We are the only 
act that was here at the old Orpheum dur- 
ing the terrible calamity. The present 
Orpheum is the old Chutes and the business 
is very good up to the present. There are 
etill about twenty thousand people living 
in tents in Golden Gate Park and the pub- 
lic squares. We are almost camping out. 
As it is, one must cook in the street. We 
have no light or water; have a candle light 
at night in our room, but expect water and 
gas this week. Plenty of both are at the 
theatre, thank Heavens! I went down to 
look over the ruins of the old Orpheum to 
sec if T could see any part of property of 
•Motoring," Charlie Sweet. Artie Hall, Au 
goust Family, Jimmy Wall or Willy Dotty, 
and the only thing I could find was an 
agate plate such as t ho AuffOUSt family 
use in their juggling act. You can imagine 
what chance there is of finding anything 
when you find melted glass bottles. Mrs. 
Armstrong saved an orange stiek from 
Frisco. I saved a nail file. 

Will U. Armstrong. 



to thank all managers and artists for 
their kindness and assistance in the hour 
of need; also Archie Levy, the Pacific 
coast agent, and Gus Temps, the theatric- 
al baggage man of San Francisco. 1 re- 
ceived from the Theatrical Belief Fund 
transportation with sleeper to Omaha and 
from George Osbom live dollars for ex- 
penses from the Weber and Fields and the 
Fay Templeton Fund. hi my presence 
Gus Temps, baggage man, was offered $15 
to move a trunk. He refused, saying that 
he had to look out for the artists first, 
and he saved all of their baggage that 
he had or could get by making relays and 
keeping ahead of the fire. 
We will be right side up with care soon. 

James O'Neill, 
Of Russell, O'Neill and Russell. 



New York, May 29. 
Editor Variety: 

Dear Sir — After working with Ed Pal- 
frey and comprising the team of Palfrey 
and Barton for two years, we succeeded in 
booking fourteen weeks over the Keith 
and Hopkins Circuit. It seems that this 
prosperity was too much for Mr. Palfrey, 
as he "jumped" away from me without 
giving me notice. He will endeavor to 
fill this time with some other person. Not 
expecting such treatment I had made no 
other arrangements for the coming season. 
I immediately framed up a new act and 
Tom Miner made me an ofTer that was 
very satisfactory. I have placed myself 
under Mr. Miner's management and will 
next season play with one of the Miner 
shows. Joe Barton. 



New York, May 30. 
Kditor Variety: 

Sir — Through your valuable "Artists' 
Korum" I would like to warn managers 
and agents against a newcomer who claims 
in his printing to be the winner of the 
Madison Square Garden Physical Culture 
Contest. This man was not the winner, 
but was second in that contest. I was 
the winner of first prize in that event, 
which was known as the $1,000 prize con- 
test to select the most perfectly developed 
man in the world. I can prove all about 
the contest by any number of magazine 
and newspaper articles. Trcloar. 



Omaha, Neb., May 28. 
I'/litor Variety : 

Sir As one of the refugees of the S:ui 
Francisco disaster I wish through Variety 



New York, May 29. 

Kditor Variety: 

Sir Some time ago I advertised an act 
l>v Kdward McWadc. An announcement 
was made in your paper that 1 would con 
liuue playing "A Timely Awakening," as 
my new act was not satisfactory. In justice 
to Mr. McWadc I would like to state that 
it was not Mr. Mc Wade's act I tried out. 
If you will kindly give this space I would 
be obliged, as I would not like to hurt 
Mr. McWadc in any way. 

Carleton Maty. 

New York, May 28. 
Kditor Variety: 

Sir In your issue of May 20 there ap 
pears a letter from Hayman and Franklin 
terming Miss Mae Kllwood and myself 
'pirates who sneak into vaudeville" with 



what they term "their brains" and act "A 
Matrimonial Agency." 

As far as we are concerned, we never 
heard of them nor did we ever see the act 
they refer to. An agent told me that they 
did have an act called "A Matrimonial 
Agency" in which one impersonates a He- 
brew. 

I am more than sorry that these folks 
are not here instead of in England. We 
could then satisfy their minds as to 
whether we are "pirates." We have been 
doing this act for fourteen weeks. I can 
show programs to prove this. Hayman 
and Franklin stated that we waited until 
they left the country, April 23. I am also 
willing to prove that they are again wrong. 

Regarding "their brains," I'll wager $500, 
and put the money up with Variety, that 
we have a different act from theirs in 
every way. 

Anyone connected with William Morris, 
B. F. Keith or Myers & Keller can bear 
out this statement. Surely it would not 
be to our advantage to take other people's 
property and ask agents (whom I have 
known for fifteen years) to book the 
same. 

I want Hayman and Franklin to rest 
assured that I never named the act "A 
Matrimonial Agency" knowing they had 
one with a similar title. I asked a num- 
Imt of artists before naming my act if 
they had ever heard of one with that 
title, and each said "No." 

Kindly grant me space for this explana- 
tion in your next issue, and oblige 

James 8. Devlin, 
Of Devlin, Ell wood and Company. 



Everett, Wash., May 23. 
Kditor Variety : 

Sir Harry Clark, manager of the Cen- 
tral Theatre, Everett, Wash., "jumped" 
Sunday night without paying salaries. 
Those who lost their entire week's salary 
were Hays and Winchell, Dayton Sisters, 
Preciado, Cecil Hobson, Louise Lester and 
myself. We have taken the house thia 
week; doing very nicely. 

Phil La Toska. 



Cincinnati, May 23. 
Kditor Variety: 

Sir — Kindly mention that, although I 
lost everything in the Frisco disaster, am 
still very much alive and was married 
April 90 to Marc Morrison, of the Folly 
Theatre, Chicago. 

If not amiss, may I compliment you 
on your paper. Alive Porter. 



SPAETH EXTRADITION CASE UP. 

Columbus, O., June 1. 
The papers in the case of W. T. Spaeth, 
who is accused of embezzling $30,000 from 
the Forcpaugh & Sells Shows, for which 
he was formerly treasurer and ticket sell- 
er, are being considered by Governor Pat- 
tison of Ohio. The alleged offense, it is 
charged, was committed in North Carolina. 
Spaeth was arrested in Cleveland and has 
been fighting extradition. Some of the 
best lawyers in the State have lieen re- 
tained to represent the State and Spaeth 
in the extradition contest. 



"MY WIFE WON'T LET ME." 
Following up the publicity given to the 
catch line in Vesta Victoria's song hit, 
•Waiting at the Church," Max Brooks has 
Secured Sadie Vedder as a partner and 
will appear in a vaudeville sketch to be 
named "My Wife Won't Let Me." 



8 



VARIETY 



Shows of the Week 



By Sime 






HAMMERSTEIN'S. 

Neither the space nor the position oc- 
cupied on the program denoted the head- 
liner this week in a bill carrying a num- 
ber of well known vaudeville names 
among those not so tried, and Trixie 
Friganza, under New Acts. 

Hope Booth and company in "The Little 
Blonde Lady" were given the most type 
on the bill to describe all there is to the 
sketch. There are some laughs in the in- 
tended farce, contributed entirely by Miss 
Booth's support, excepting the laughter 
caused by her efforts at acting. No at- 
tempt has been made to correct the minor 
defects of the initial show. The office 
boy still calls his superior "Hammer" 
without prefixing the customary title, and 
the superior himself, although playing an 
impossible dramatic critic, continues to 
remark "I done" where "did" instead 
would not cause curiosity as to the origi- 
nal manuscript of the piece. 

Horace Goldin with his illusions is 
working rapidly this week, although han- 
dicapped to some extent through the situ- 
ation of the stage, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Jimmy Barry suffer from early placement, 
appearing after the opening act. The 
house does not seem to grasp all the 
satire of the Barry sketch, although that 
it is capable of doing so is proven by the 
reception given Ryan and Richfield much 
further down on the bill in "Mag Hag- 
gerty's Reception." All the points arc 
laughed at, and. Ryan's scenes with the 
blackboard and butler were greeted with 
screams. Miss Richfield is erring in con- 
tinuing to wear the green gown. It is 
a color decidedly to be avoided by her in 
costumes. 

The singing ami dancing of Eddie 
Leonard, supported by MeGloin and 
Smith, "got to" the house immediately 
upon the opening, an effective scene with 
a special drop, one of two such used. Mr. 
Leonard has two good songs, his dancing 
has never been questioned, and the boys 
are satisfactory in that respect also, but 
could be improved in looks by different 
dressing. It might be advisable to try 
them out in natural garb. 

Eor the fifth time this season the Em- 
pire City Quartet are making an appear- 
ance at this house. Some new comedy 
has been inserted for this occasion by 
Harry Cooper, he burlesquing almost 
every act in the show and giving a trav- 
esty on two of Gulden's tricks. Two 
new parodies arc sung, both good. 

The Wilton Brothers on the horizontal 
bars over a bounding net are doing the 
same tricks, and the Mitchells, colored 
singers and dancers, made quite a hit 
for an opening act. The little girl has 
been put back in, and the boy does well 
with his dancing. Some one ought to 
realize that his face Ls badly made up. 



"The Futurity Winner," a scenic racing 
sketch belonging to the Ned Way burn 
Attractions, the company that was 
formed to produce novelties for vaudeville, 
has been placed in storage. \o more 
time could be secured through price and 
it being well toward the end of the sea- 
son. The Keith Agency offered $560 
weekly. That amount would not have 
paid the operating expenses. 



TWENTY-THIRD STREET. 

Last Monday evening was a night of 
mishaps at the Twenty-third Street house. 
The first foreign comedy was during the 
Simon-Gardner sketch, when a woman and 
her seat fell in the balcony. As Cressy 
and I)ayne reached the pathetic, part of 
"Town Hall To-night" a white eat walked 
forth on the stage, halting midway, and, 
after surveying the pair, proceeded on its 
journey to the opposite side. Quinlan and 
Mack supplied the third incident, Mack's 
sword breaking in the centre as it clashed 
with Quinlan's, the broken piece flying 
through the air and landing in the far side 
aisle. 

Two of the numbers are under New 
Acts ("Daisy-land and the Sharp Broth- 
ers). 

One of the hits was Winona Winter. 
This young woman, looking really sweet in 
a pink gown, had the audience enthusias- 
tic over her ventriloquial work. Miss 
Winter could drop the announcement of 
imitations or impersonations and rest only 
on what she herself wishes to offer. The 
result would be exact Iv the same. 

There was abundant comedy in the 
makeup of the show and it was led by 
Louis A. Simon and Grace Gardner in "The 
New Coachman." This sketch is always 
a laugh-getter. Tile house is laughing be- 
fore the real broad comedy begins, when 
shrieks are heard, A new finish since last 
seen has been added, doing away with the 
noisy college boys. The revised version is 
credited to Miss Gardner, who appears as 
well as formerly in all respects. Mr. Simon 
draws every inch of fun possible, and 
Cellmont Barkland plays the husband 
with a fervor evident in his caresses. 

The Elite Musical Four are holding to 
the same routine, still persisting in at- 
tempting to secure music out of water- 
filled bottles. 

One plays the accordeon, receiving 
enough applause in palliation, but there 
should be a new set of xylophones pur- 
chased. The quartet received a fair re- 
ception, but the act may be bettered so 
easily that it seems a pity it is not. 

Dan Quinlan and Keller Mack gave the 
stvle of coined v the audience liked in "The 
Travelling Dentist," the name given to the 
conversation in "one" held in front of 
their own drop. The idea is new to the 
Bast and much was made of a tooth-pull- 
ing episode. A different finish should be 
procured. The sudden change to the 
swords is not funny, nor is it expected. 

Cn*ssv and Davne in 'Town Hall To 
night" pleased jn what is Cressy's best 
comedy sketch, and the Camille Trio closed 
with their grotesque antics on the bars. 

'Hie Alpha Trio came over here from 
Pastor's to open with hoop rolling and 
juggling. The hoops are vari-colored and 
the setting would be enhanced by a black 
cloth drop, against which the hoops and 
manipulations would stand out to better 
advantage. The comedy man ought not 
to speak, but give what comedy possible 
in pantomime alone: 



An opinion rendered a few days ago by 
Corporation Counsel John .T. Pelany on 
the standing of the vaudeville agents un- 
der the amended employment agency law 
has made it necessary for all the agents 
t«» file new applications and secure new 
bonds. 



KEITH'S. 

A comedy acrobatic act appearing at 
S:lo is the hit of the Keith bill this week. 
It is Flood Brother! and company, the 
''company" consisting of an off-stage as- 
sistant. The acrobatic! cover almost every 
variety of ground work, even to first class 
"Kisley" feats, while the comedy is well 
handled, with some new effects. The 
whole was so well liked that several re- 
calls were taken and the act will be a 
hit from both ends wherever shown. 

A newcomer in vaudeville, Claude Gil- 
lingwater, is under New Acts, and also 
Harry Evans, a boy soprano with a his- 
tory. 

Emma Cams was prominent, appearing 
at this house for the first time or at least 
since a long way back. Miss Cams did 
not offer her customary well chosen rou- 
tine, having no "coon" songs. Neither was 
she in good voice. Three numbers were 
sung, although the orchestra had further 
music to play. 

Charlie Case, the monologist, made them 
all laugh. He loosened up the features 
for the first time of a blonde young woman 
down in front during the evening. If the 
rest of the Jerseyites are of the same dis- 
position, Mr. Keith's Bijou Theatre in Jer- 
sey City, where she evidently hailed from, 
has a hard road to travel. 

The Bedouin Arabs closed the bill be- 
fore some antedated pictures, and Brock- 
man, Mack and Belmont in a good posi- 
tion with "The Count on Mother's Ac- 
count" gave the usual act surrounding Mr. 
Mack, with Brockman's piano playing and 
singing as added attractions. Miss Bel- 
mont sang too and should be careful in 
avoiding high notes, while Brockman 
ought to do more than he does at present 
on the instrument. 

LeRoy and Woodford easily scored a hit. 
Mr. LeRoy is not crowded to secure new 
material, for his present collection brings 
sufficient reward, but he really ought to 
put in a few new stories. He could im- 
prove his appearance by dressing in a sack 
suit of stylish design. The present frock 
coat gives a too elderly look. 

The Misses Delmore are verging on a 
"sister act" which the musical instruments 
do not offset. The first girl to appear 
wears a short brown costume; too short, 
as it reaches to the knees only, for no 
noticeable reason. Several changes are 
made. These girls are always varying 
their act, being liked by the audience for 
several reasons, not the least of which is 
the refinement attached. 

The dancing of Willie and Edith ITart 
fared better than the singing, and Morton 
and Diamond did well enough wit! a lot of 
Fred Bailey "stuff," even going so far as 
to give all of the "echo." The man has a 
clever fall and it would be worth while to 
have an attempt at an original offering 
gotten up. Tt could not help but improve 
them. 

The blackface man of Niblo and Keilly 
is showing some loose dancing altogether 
new. He is doing also genuine comedy and 
the act brings plenty of applause. The 
whitcfaced fnd of the team, made up as 
a boy. ought to add color to his face to 
help the illusion. He is a good dancer, in 
which the team is especially strong. 

Francis Wood is also programmed. 



HURTIG & SEAMON'S. 

One had to sit through a long-drawn- 
out weary bill at Hurtig & Seamon's this 
week to find a laugh. It came at the end 
with the Jack Wilson Trio, but was not 
brought out so much with the comedy as 
the impromptu remarks. The preceding 
acts, though, were of much help. Wilson 
with Ada Lane and Albert Greene, the two 
other members, all in blackface, give a 
first class imitatio/i of a colored act iu 
singing and dancing. Greene as the 
"straight" man is capital. Mr. Wilson has 
put on a burlesque of Vesta Victoria and 
it secures many encores. 

Ray Cox is a favorite here, although 
she comes back for a repeat engagement 
this season with the same material pre- 
viously heard, excepting one song. Miss 
,Oox has a soft Southern dialect naturally, 
and could do much better by dropping the 
imitations at the opening, giving more 
stories, and hold to her natural singing 
voice. 

Silver and O'Neill (or Sylvan and Oneal, 
the program man. at this house never 
agreeing with the billboards) in a comedy 
acrobatic sketch showed some medium ac- 
robatics and a similar brand of comedy. 
Inasmuch as neither the work nor the fun 
originated with the team, the comedy end 
can not be said to suffer much at the light 
reception received. Rice and l'revost, 
Hiekey and Nelson, together with the 
finish of Tommy O'Brien Havel, are used, 
which taken together with the man made 
up as a "Dutchman," a character he does 
not seem conversant with, lends an air of 
disenchantment to the present offering, with 
no hope of redemption while it is clung 

to. 

Chris Smith ami two Johnsons seem to 
have improved their act and it is going 
better. The songs take fairly well and the 
action has been accelerated. Theo Julian's 
musical act was well thought of and she 
appeared at the opening under the spot 
light, which gave a soft effect to the set- 
ting. Miss Julian should have held to 
that light throughout. It gives the three- 
sided table a pretty appearance, brings the 
other instruments into relief, while she 
herself is a pleasing picture in it. This 
artiste has a quiet, reserved manner on 
the stage, and that method of playing is 
to be much desired to an overdisplay of 
conceit or confidence. Miss Julian declined 
a heart v encore. 

Morton, Temple and Morton opened the 
show and stayed on the stage for the pur- 
|H)se of lengthening out the bill, it would 
seem. An encore was taken even after 
it was thought they were in the dressing 
rooms. Two men and a woman make up 
the trio. The comedy is barren of laughs, 
the grammar is terrifying, "I seen" being 
the common expression, and there is one 
distasteful line from the comedy man 
where he speaks about his earliest ex- 
perience as a baby. 

The act should be worked over and cut 
down to a moderate length of time, at 
least. 

Catherine Hayes and Sabel Johnson, 
with William Hawtrey and company, are 
under New Acts. 



Fred llallen and Mollie Fuller have a 
new sketch called "The Sunday-school 
Boy." 



VARIETY 



Shows of the Week 



CONEY ISLAND. 

The music halls along the Bowery are in 
full blast. Decoration Day the patronage 
was large enough to warrant the fa- 
miliar device of serving only bottled beer 
at "two bits" each, and announcing at 
short intervals "half an hour's intermis- 
sion, all out." 

All the old places are running and in 
addition a new one has been opened near 
the entrance to Steeplechase Park. This 
is labelled "Lent's Music Hall." Here 
three comedians are "on the job," assist- 
ed by a chorus of fifteen girls whose dress- 
ing is bad and manner tired. By virtue of 
his position as stage manager Frank 
Nicholson has grabbed off the principal 
comedy job. He just refuses to leave the 
stage at all, and unless his ambitious de- 
sire for work lapses with the warmer 
weather he will have to have his meals 
brought on. The girls and comedians are 
liked better because they leave the stage 
now and then. That permits the audience 
the undisturbed enjoyment of their drinks. 
The attractive feature of this establish- 
ment is that beer is dealt out by the glass 
at a nickel. 

Low comedy waiters are the headliners 
in Connor's Imperial. A pugnacious 
rowdy in a dirty white apron and jacket 
on Wednesday furnished more and better 
amusement to the table* near the back 
of the hall by his angry recriminations 
directed to a brother beer slinger who had 
refused to lend him money the night be- 
fore. In the intervals when this dialogue 
died down somewhat, a sister team on the 
stage, who, it was said, were members 
of the "Dreamland" burlesquers the past 
season, got some attention foi their acro- 
batic dancing. They worked harder than 
some girls to be seen in more pretentious 
organizations. The chorus here numbers 
a score of fair looking girls. There are a 
number of faces in the line that have 
been seen in burlesque companies. The 
comedians were as bad as they could be. 

Inman's give the best show on the Bow- 
ery. There is a visible result of training 
ifi the chorus, which works hard, and some 
of the numbers appeared to have been re- 
hearsed. 'Hie comedians, whose names, 
according to a waiter in the place, are 
Fields, Watson and Whelan, displayed a 
positive gluttony for work. They had a 
boxing bout in which their comedy talents 
were given scope for sixteen minutes by 
the watch. This business ended when a 
policeman entered to arrest the fighters. 
Thi9 required a lot of clubbing and it was 
a matter of deep and lasting regret that 
the policeman's club was only a stuffed 
prop. 

They're wise at Roster's. They have 
eliminated the comedians from their 
scheme and filled the stage with girls. 
All of them to the number of fifteen or 
so were well dressed in short skirts, which 
were bright in color even if the material 
was cheap. The wisdom of the "all-girl" 
cast as against the boresome comedian 
scheme of cheap entertainment for Coney 
Island purposes was apparent in the num- 
ber of seats occupied at Roster's. 



"The Magic Boat" will be the name of 
the new sketch in which Smith Champion 
and Sam .1. Adams will appear about Au- 
gust 20. 



HENDERSON'S. 

A fairly good bill at the Coney Island 
vaudeville house is badly injured by an 
excessively poor arrangement of the acts. 
Fourteen numbers are provided. With the 
smaller acts playing three times, or even 
twice, this should be sufficient to keep a 
continuous show running with some de- 
gree of smoothness and continuity from 
1:30 to midnight. As the show is man- 
aged now, however, there are wide "waits" 
between the acts and intermissions are 
sprung at short intervals. 

The Royal Musical Five appear to be 
the headliners. The members of the quin- 
tet are all young and look exceedingly 
well. The music they make is of rather 
higher class than that to which Coney 
Island audiences are educated, but the five 
were well liked. 

The Dixie Serenaders did well in the 
first half of their act. They employ a 
full stage for this and confine themselves 
to singing and dancing. Finishing in 
"one," they have run in a quantity of 
talk and minstrel comedy. This is not of 
a quality to please even in a quiet and 
well regulated house, but at Henderson's 
the greater part of the dialogue did not 
get beyond the first half dozen rows. 

The same criticism might be made of 
Thomas ami Payne, another colored act. 
Their songs and dances were excellent, 
the mans coon shouting and fast eccentric 
dance being particularly well liked. But 
when the pair began to talk they injured 
the good impression already made. 

The Durand Trio, all men, had voices of 
a quality that indicated they had had ex- 
perienee in more serious work. They 
made an unusually good straight singing 
act with operatic numbers, singing most- 
ly in French. The act is rather heavy for 
Henderson's. The men should secure an 
adviser in the costuming department. 

Carlisle's Ponies made a distinct hit. 
The feature of the little circus is a "talk- 
ing pony," which counts numbers by 
thumping its hoof on the floor. A popu- 
lar trick was the adding in this wav of 
numbers shouted direct to the pony by 
persons in the audience. A better act for 
purposes of the Henderson establishment 
would be difficult to find. 

May Evans, whistler, pleased with sev- 
eral solos and a collection of bird imita- 
tions. Her tones are as strong and clear 
as those of a flute. Miss Evans looks 
well, but has an untidv wav of dressing 
her hair. 

La Hoses in a novelty wire act filled in 
their apportioned time entertainingly. 
The time was shorter than that demanded 
of most of the others, and they were able 
to get away before they had tried the 
audience. 

This was true as well of Les Romanos. 
The five -women in this act work with 
speed and dress the stage well in their 
acrobatic dances. The youngest dancer of 
the five is an attractive youngster, appar- 
ently not more than twelve years old. 

The others were Tom Moore, coon 
singer; Zanoras, comedy bicyclists; Craw- 
ford and Heitzman, singers and dancers; 
Rimball and Donovan, banjoists; Josie 
Antonette, soubrette, and Rurtis and 
Busse with their toy terriers. 



By Rush 



PASTOR'S. 
Loull Montrose and her four "auto 
girls" give fifteen minutes or so of fast 
entertainment to the Pastor audiences this 
week. All in the quintet can dance and 
sing. The greater weight of responsibility 
falls upon the leader. She works harder 
than any of her subordinates and it is 
due largely to her efForts that the act 
moves along to a good percentage of ap- 
plause. The final number is the best. The 
girls wear cowboy outfits that are pic- 
turesquely becoming and their dancing 

makes an excellent finish. Miss Montrose's 
s<»ngs were well liked. 

The added attraction was "Jack and 
Jill," a playlet with a dainty little 
girl in the principal role. She was ap- 
parently the youngest of a trio billed a.s 
Arthur, Mildred and Stella Boy Ian. It 
was the tot's pretty chubby face and win- 
ning personality that won the audience, 
the sketch tells a neat and interesting 
story and an effective finish is provided. 
The act could be somewhat improved by 
such pruning as would make it more com- 
pact, although in its present form the 
necessary technical points are adequately 
developed. The surplusage is in the spe- 
cialties of the two children, the girl and 
the boy. 

Orietto and Taylor are lunnpered by a 
talking sketch in which nothing of mo- 
ment hapjM'ns. The pair have voices of 
a quality not too frequently heard here. 
aboutf and the oj>eratic numbers with 
which they finish are exceeding good. They 
did not begin to sing, however, until after 
they had finished a long comedy sketch 
with not enoufh real comedy to be visible 
to the naked eye. They should secure a 
vehicle in which their singing ability may 
be given greater sco|>e. 

The Evans Trio is made up of three 
nomologists.. There is no attempt at a 
sketeh structure for their various special* 
ties to hang on with any pretence at con- 
tinuity. They simply appear one after 
the other, do their little bits and disap 
pear to make room for the next, all re- 
turning for the final ensemble number. 
John LeClair has some clever juggling, 
but would do well to u-e the trick with 
a small table cloth ami a stick for a finish. 
It would give him a better exit than the 
blocks. 

The Bowery Quartet makes better music 
for Fourteenth street purposes in concert 
than when it* members sinj; alone. The 
boys, who dress in tin- usual "newsboy" 
style, make good harmony and have a (fowl 
number with a "map game" a.s an inci- 
dental. 

Colonel Magnus had an entertaining dog 
circus and Carl Breluner does slelght-of- 
hand tricks in another part of the program. 
Both show inexcusable carelessness in the 
dressing. The Colonel wears evening 
clothed that have long since outlived their 
usefulness and Brehmer appears garl>ed in 
an Ill-fitting and out-of-date dark suit. The 
same indifference seems to extend to the 
laving out of the two men's work, al- 
though Brehmer displayed considerable 
deftness and both were well liked. 

Among the others were Newell and Nib- 
lo. Charles 11. Duncan and the Gordon 
Brothers. 



FIFTY-EIGHTH STREET. 

Willie Weston, a youthful impersonator 
of stage celebrities, and Charles Leonard 
Fletcher in his new sketch "A Breeze from 
the West" are reviewed under New Acts. 
The rest of the bill is made up of standard 
acts ol metropolitan reputation. 

Angie Norton and Paul Nicholson have 
gone back to the sketch they formerly 
used, "The lady's Tailor." The little 
farce is an excellent vehicle for the talents 
Of this clever pair. It is unusually bright 
in text and develops a farcical situation 
that has elements of real humor. The 
sketch was apparently written with the in- 
troduction of Mr. Nicholson's specialties in 
view, and the neatness with which the im- 
personation of Jumiw J. Corbett is brought 
forward is only equalled by the excellence 
of that performance. 

Smith and Campbell with their sidewalk, 
conversation make good their programme 
caption "the somewhat different comedi- 
ans." Their talk is fast and pointed and 
they keep it up to the mark by working in 
new stuff from time to time. 

"Ye Colonial Septet" have a picturesque 
musical act with artistic setting, effects 
and atmosphere. The costuming, particu- 
larly as to the men, was probably attract- 
ive when the act started out, but now is 
sadly in need of freshening. The violin 
number merits a much more enthusiastic 
reception than was accorded, but the vocal 
numbers and the ensembles with the horns 
were well received. 

The Majestic Trio of colored dancers and 
singers caught the favor of the audience. 
The straight man has changed his ballad to 
a lighter number, to the great advantage 
of the act. The clowning of the comedy 
man is the feature of the trio's perform- 
ance. For a finish he has an odd eccentric 
dance that left the audience in high good 
humor. The bit of business with a roll of 
stage money puts him in the class with 
the real colored comedians, of whom there 
are not more than could be counted on two 
hands. 

Waiter Jones and Mabel Hit* come over 
from the Twenty-third Street house after 
an intervening week. Miss Hite's attract- 
ive person ami her rather grotesque but 
decidedly funny comedy methods consti- 
tute the strength of the offering. Walter 
.Jones is a comedian of ability ami experi- 
ence, but his part in the present sketeh 
ihe* not give him exceptional opjw>rt unity 
for the display of his talents. The pair 
have a comedy dame to close and get away 
without wearing their welcome out. 

Cliffe Bersac's circus holds over for the 
second week as the closing number. The 
Kast side audiences appear to have taken 
kindly to the bucking donkey, the revolv- 
ing table and Mr. Ber/,ac's clowns. 

Bertina and Brockway, a sister team of 
dancers and singers, opened the show. Th.»y 
dress with good judgment and their work is 
fair. 



Willard Simms, late of "The Rollicking 
cirl" company, is booked to appear at 
Keith's Union Square week of June 11 
with an act called "Tilings I Have Seen 
on the Stage." This is Bald to be a scries 
of impersonations resembling the specialty 
which Mr. Simms used in "The American 
Beauty." Be will be assisted by Edith 
Conrad. 






10 



VARIETY 



SUM M ER PARKS 



"Fairyland" at Paterson, N. J., opened 
the 26th. A big crowd attended. It is Mel 
ville & Schultheiser's park. 



1>coii Loeb, operator of penny arcades 
throughout the United States, has opened 
a ten-cent vaudeville house and j>ark in 
l'arfucah, Ky. 



Talaquega Park and Crescent Perk, Paw- 
tucket, opened up for the season May 30. 
Vaudeville will be put in the theatre about 
the last week in June. 



The announced airship flight of C. \V. 
Williams, a vaudeville artist, previously 
announced for June 3 at Olympic Park. 
Newark, has l>een postponed until the 
10th. 



Next summer Audubon Park at New 
Orleans will have a theatre where vaude- 
ville and light oj>era will be shown. It 
will cost $30,000. McConnico & Campbell 
are promoting it. 



Charles Bobinson, the comedian, just 
closed with the "Parisian Belles" bur- 
lesque company, will be at "Dream City," 
Pittsburg, during this summer. Mr. Rob- 
inson is at the Chimes Theatre. 



Pain's "Last Days of Pompeii" will com- 
mence a two weeks engagement June 11 
on the circus grounds, Cincinnati. The 
spectacle is to be reproduced exactly as ex- 
hibited at Coney Island, New York. 



Archibald Fox is the new manager of 
Athletic Park in New Orleans, succeed- 
ing Capt. A. W. Lewis, who will devote 
his time to building a "White City" at 
Spanish Fort on Lake Pontchatrain, La. 



Monarch Park, midway between Oil City 
and Franklin, Pa., is ready for the open- 
ing with many new attractions. Vaude- 
ville will be played exclusively in the 
theatre and the Northwestern Band of 
Meadville furnishes the music. 



Waldameer Park at Erie, Pa., opened for 
the season May 19. A series of band con- 
certs began on that date. The dance hall 
and other amusement places are open. The 
theatre will open with vaudeville June 4. 
Four Mile Creek Park will open soon. 



Bismarck Garden, Chicago, a popular 
summer abode for fashionable North 
Siders, opens its regular season June 10. 
A series of concerts bv different, bands 
and orchestras will l>e given there, in ad- 
dition to the thirst quenching beverages. 



Athletic Park at Buffalo opened Wed 
nesday of last week. Twelve thousand 
people "bumi>cd the bumps." I>uss' band 
was the feature. All the attractions were 
well patronized. The "figure eight" could 
not accommodate the crowds. Hobert 
MacBroom is general manager. 



The Vallev Theatre in Svracuse will 
open June 2T>. Vaudeville, Invoked by 
Frank Melville, will be played there this 
summer. 'Hie theatre is located in Onon- 
daga Valley, within a pleasant trolley ride 



from the citv. It is the favorite resort of 
the Sviacnsans in warm weather. 



A number <»i parks U»ok«Ml by Frank 
Melville opened last Monday. Among them 
were Luna, Johnstown, Pa. ; Alameda, 
Butler, Pa.; Casino, Binghamton, N. Y.; 
Olenhaven, Rochester; Spring l^ike, Tren 
ton; Kdgewood, Shamokin; Paxtang, Har- 
risburg, and Woodland, Latrobe, Pa. 

A " natural" scenic railway will be built 
by the Ingersoll & Hopkins Co., under 
contract, for the Walkill Transit Co. at 
Middletown, N. Y. It is the first "natural" 
railway to be constructed. There is a 
mile where the cars will run on the ground 
around a hill. The construction will be 
simple, the growth of the site filling most 
of the requirements. 



Ooloron Park at Jamestown, N. Y„ 
opened May 27. The attractions number 
those of last year and in addition a mon- 
ster roller rink has been provided. The 
• lancing auditorium has been divided, giv- 
ing ample space for both amusements. 
McFadden Brothers, of Sharon, Pa., are the 
managers. The theatre will play vaude- 
ville. The Interstate League ball games 
are drawing crowds to this resort. 



The season at Coney Island has not yet 
struck its gait in the parks. "Dream- 
land," "Luna" and the Steeplechase are 
open, but all of the attractions in each 
are not ready for business yet. "Dream- 
land" has a number of new novelties in 
the park line, and "Luna" one big amuse- 
ment- attraction yet to be completed. No 
great preparations are evident at the 
Steeplechase. "Tours" arc all over the 
island. 



The Chutes, Chicago, the only amuse- 
ment resort on the West Side, opened last 
Saturday. Among the new features this 
year are a Parisian novelty called 
"The Arabian Nights Spectacle." "Dream- 
land," which is also spectacular in effects, 
consisting of twenty-two massive and 
elaborate tableaux, illustrated songs, mov- 
ing pictures of the San Francisco earth- 
quake, and vaudeville acts will be given 
in Niemeyer's Theatre. 



Bushkill Park, about three miles from 
Baston, Pa., opened for the summer May 
30. A fine dancing pavilion, carousal and 
Chinese pagoda have been erected, also a 
menagerie. In the "Com us" building mov- 
ing pictures and illustrated songs will be 
given four times daily. No definite con- 
clusion has been reached as to playing 
vaudeville. The park is well officered and 
there are park attendants. (Jeorge Seiple 
is manager. 



Wonderland, at St. Paul, the Twin 
Cities' largest amusement park, opened the 
season of 1906 on May 27 to a large at- 
tendance. All the buildings and shows are 
bra ml new ami "Fighting the Flames" is 
the chief attraction." The New Audi- 
torium, in course of construction, will l>e 
opened July 25 by the Saengerfest. This 
building is Wing built by a public sub 
script ion of $2r>0.000. It may l>e used for 
an independent theatre when the occasion 
demands. 



WESTERN WHEEL "SYNDICATING." 

With the removal this week to the 
Kniekerl nicker Theatre Building of the 
office of the Western Burlesque Wneel will 
go into effect the new booking arrange- 
ment. 

Under it all acts and people, including 
chorus girls, engaged in any capacity for 
any show on the Wheel will have to be 
booked through that office, of which Wal- 
ter J. Plimmer will have charge. 

A commission of five per cent will be 
charged on all bookings. This is a de- 
parture for burlesque. Formerly no charge 
was made. 



MULLEN'S BENEFIT TO-MORROW. 

The benefit to be tendered James Mullen 
will occur to-morrow (Sunday) evening at 
the Novelty Theatre, Williamsburg. 



HAYMARKET LOSES MANAGER. 

Chicago, June 1. 

After having been the manager of the 
llaymarket Theatre for several years, W. 
W. Freeman resigned that position, and 
Messrs. Kohl & Castle, the owners, accept 
ed the resignation. 

It is currently reported that Mr. Free- 
man will open a theatre of his own, pre 
siimably for vaudeville. 

JESSE BURNS QUITS WILLIAMS. 

Chicago, June 1. 

Jesse Burns, manager and part owner 
of Williams' "ImjK'rials" burlesque com- 
pany, has severed his connection with 
Mr. Williams, according to an unconfirmed 
report. 

He was succeeded by James Weeden, 
who will have charge of the show for the 
balance of the season. 

There will l>e only one Williams show 
on the Western Burlesque Wheel of next 
season if report is true. 



OFF FOR EUROPE. 

Yorke and Adams, joint Htars of "Bank- 
ers and Brokers," in which they have been 
playing this season, sailed for Europe 
Thursday of this week, to be gone until 
September. They had been offered attract- 
ive time in vaudeville hereabouts, but de- 
clined to work duriug the summer. The 
voyage is intended purely as a pleasure 
trip. 



FISHER AND CARROLL NO MORE. 

Fisher and Carroll, the one-time vaude- 
ville team, but now disrupted, after play- 
ing the roles of Baron Sparker and Capt. 
Sliver wit « respectively in the Lew Fields 
company, have settled for next season. Car- 
roll has signed with Klaw & Erlanger, his 
new partner being Johnnie McVeigh. Fisher 
will remain with Fields. 



TWO ENOUGH FOR FOY. 

"No more four shows a day for me," re- 
marked Eddie Foy last Sunday night, as 
he finished his double engagement during 
the week at the Alhambra ami Hammer- 
stein's. 

Mr. Foy added an imitation of Vesta 
Victoria the last two days and the idea 
was liked. It was suggested to Foy by 
I). L. Robinson, the Alhambra's manager. 

WILLIAMS BOOKS AHEAD. 

Percy Williams is adopting the English 
manner of l>ooking. Horace Goldin and 
Merian's dogs have been l>ooked by Mr. 
Williams for a tour of his houses in '08. 



Cobb's Comer 



JUNE 2, 19O0. 



No. 14. A WMkly Word With WILL th« Wordwright. 

I/ot me li.tml you this bunch of fire's. 

Waltz Me Around Again. Willie. 

Blanche King's lilt in "Hi* Honor the Mayor." 

While the Old Mill Wheel is Turning. 

A hallail that moves their hearts and hands 

(slides). 

I'll Do Anything in the World for Tou. 

Already n hit, with one of those "sing It 

again" melodies. 

What Would You Take for Me, Mammal 

(slides). 

It made Ed Howard (Howard and North) cry. 

That's going some. 

And 

Rosebud, or Call and I'll Come to Tou. 

Positively the best march song in the world 

to-day. 

A craze at the London Coliseum. 

All five sent free on receipt a card or program. 

WILL D. COBB 

WOBDWRIOHT 

48 W. 29TH STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 



ELMHURST HAS A SHOW. 

Last Tuesday night a monster benefit 
jH'rformauee was given for the benefit of 
the Elmhurst Catholic church in that vil- 
lage. 

'Hie arrangements were made by Sam 
IXdlins, who took part, besides the Empire 
City Quartet, James E. Sullivan and com- 
pany, Ijottie Cilson, Elgie Bo wen, John- 
son, Davenport and l»rello, Collins and 
Hurt and two acts supplied by Tony Pas- 
tor from his week's bill. 

The a H'aii- was a huge success, both 
financially and as an entertainment. 



A MANAGERIAL CONCLAVE. 

Uist Sunday night while the Sunday 
night concert at llammerstein's Victoria 
Theatre was in progress, an assembly of 
vaudeville managers of repute gathered on 
the sidewalk outside. 

in the gathering were Oscar Hammer- 
stein, 1$. P. Keiths E. F. Albee, Morris 
Meyerfeld, Jr., Martin Beck, John J. Mur- 
dock and Charles E. Kohl. 

Humors could be seen shooting outward 
from the conventional conversation. The 
lirst and convincing report to those stand- 
ing around was that Mr. Hammerstein had 
offered his theatre to the Keith party at 
a figure which is being deliberated over. 



BEDINI AND ARTHUR BACK. 

After a long absence in Europe Bedini 
and Arthur returned this week. In about 
six weeks Mr. Bedini will go into the 
managerial field, Arthur continuing as an 
artist. Lillian Ingersoll, an actress, was 
brought over from Germany by Bedini 
and will erter vaudeville with a sketch 
of foreign make, called "The Hand." 
"Scamp" Montgomery has been asked to 
appear jointly with Miss Ingersoll in it. 



SHAYNE AND LASKY RESIGN. 

Edward Shayne and Jesse Lasky are 
now in the city, both having returned 
some time ago from Chicago, where they 
were located in charge of the Western 
office and business of William Morris. 

Messrs. I/asky and Shayne resigned 
their position voluntarily for over the 
summer and may again take up their 
duties in the fall. 



Tom Lancaster, the blackface com- 
edian, is now at his home in New Castle, 
Del. During the summer he will head a 
vaudeville company playing the New 
England amusement parks. 



v. 



VARIETY 



11 



CORRESPONDENCE 

ALBANY, N. T. 

PROCTOR'S (Howard Graham, res. uigr.).— 
Week 28: Henry Lee's Impersonations of great 
men were of a high order. Campbell and John 
mod, ruined y bicyclists, were the hit of the bill. 
Gardner and Stoddard In "Vaudeville Frivolities" 
were very clever. Milt Wood, woodsn shoe daneer. 
excellent. "Six Sophomores and a Freshman" 
was very much enjoyed. Gus Leonard, comedy 
magician, amusing. Horace Wright, Italian char 
acter Impersonation, only fair. Troja, French 
comedienne, not up to the standard. Motion pic 
tures. , MARTBL, 



ALPENA, MICH. 

BIJOU (Steele & Denlson, mgrs.).— "A Trip to 
Egypt," 2H. pleased a fair house. The dancing of 
Phoebe Caidownle, the best that has been seen 
here. Coff Phillips' Hebrew, made a big hit. 
Boyd Gllmore, baritone, was well received. Cath- 
erine LaTour, soprano, has a rich voice. NOTE. 

— The company disbanded at Saginaw, 28. The 
members will play parks for the summer. 

GEORGE J. OUILLETTB. 



ATLANTA, GA. 

CASINO (H. Cardosa, mgr.).— Week 28: Crowded 
houses witnessed the following bill: Chasslno, 
shadow graphlsf, clever act; Idoletto, novelty acro- 
bat, one of the best here; Sheppard Camp, mono- 
logue, well received, this being his home; James 
and Bonnie Farley, good; Murphy and \V 11 lard In 
sketch more than made good; Howard and Bland, 
old favorites here, made their usual hit; Camera- 
graph pictures, selections fine. STAR (J. B. 

Thompson, mgr.). — Week 28, one of the best hills 
of the season. Florence Moore, comedienne, good. 
Frankford, Lnurl and Frankford In sketch. "The 
Maid and the Mick." hit of the bill. Jennie Del 
mar. illustrated songs, fair only. Bell. Liudsey 
« and Bell in sketch, "A Tangled Affair," kept the 
house in an uproar. Martyne Sisters, songs and 
dances, very good. New moving pictures and a one 
act drama, "The Miner's Oath," by William Z. 
Rogers and house stock company, sent the audi- 
ence home feeling they had seen a capital slum. 

BRIX. 



BALTIMORE, MD. 

GAYETY (W. L. Ballauf. mgr.).— Week 28: 
Big houses, The Dainty Duchess company. The 
entertainment opens with the one-act (sketch. 
"The Duchess In the Country." which was well 
received. The olio Includes: James Llchter In 
songs, good; The Five Musketeers, a European 
novelty act by girls, made good; Smith and 
Arado, comedy singers and dancersT ajre a decided 
hit; Clara Wleland, In new songs, average; An- 
derson and Leonard, In sketch "Professional 
Life," are exceptionally good; The Four Car- 
rolls, acrobats, pleased; the one-act burlesque en- 
titled "The' Hofbrauhouse Upside Down" con- 
cludes the bill. ELECTRIC PARK (Schan- 

lierger & Irvln, mgrs.). — -Week 28, large houses 
The vaudeville show In the big casino Is heade 1 
by Toby Claude, comedienne, who captured the 
entire house; Kline, Ott Brothers and Nicholson 
In a musical act, made good; Greene and Wer- 
ner In their novelty act. "Babes of the Jungle." 
are very clever; Christie and Wills In Juggling 
act are entertaining; Seymour and Hill, acrobats, 
average: Raymond and Caverly, German come- 
dians, took well; the Klnetoscope ends the bill. 
Free attractions upon the lawn are: Wolflng's 
Stallions and Dogs, amusing; The Marvelous 
Rooge. who gives an exhibition on the Black 
wire with his unlcycle, received great applause. 
Deck concerts by Fisher's Rand of thirty-five 
men. Automobile and motor cycle races: Pain's 
fireworks. O. J. WOLFF. 

BURLINGTON, IA. 

GARRICK (Vic Hugo. mgr.). Starting Mon- 
day, May 2K. the Oarrlck Stock Company present- 
ing two bills, "Mabel Heath" and "The Man »f 

Mystery." both very good. UNDER CANVAS. 

-Coming: Taltstt's Fighting the Flames. June o 
and 8; Forepaugh & Sells' Circus. June 19. 

D. G. C. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

MAJESTIC (C. E. Draper, mgr. for Kohl A 
Castle). — Clayton White and Marie Stuart pre- 
sent "Paris." similar to "Dickey." Their pres- 
ent effort contains more Parisian ginger. Nora 
Rayes returned from Paris recently. Her singing 
specialty and impersonations achieved a decided 
success. "A Horse on Hogan." offered by T^eRoy 
and Clayton, has gone through the process of 
Improvement since It was seen last and proved 
(he comedy hit of the bill. Sydney Deane and 
company have one of the liest things seen here In 
"Christmas on Blackwell's Island." which Is well 
written, with a number of excellent vocal selec- 
tions. Jimmy Wall has some good stories and 
parodies and pleased Immensely. Musical Klelst 
Mallory Brooks ami Holllday in a musical act 
brother some years ago, ami although Its novelty 
Is almost threadbare, continues to Interest the 
audience. Rosalre and Doretto, comedy acrobats, 
are better than the average, and the Two Plerres, 
Jugglers, show a number of good tricks. Mar- 
guerite Newton, stories and songs, pleased, and 
Emily Nice, singer, added applause to her credit, 
.lames and Celia Welch, dancing dolls, and Row- 
man, magician, make up the balance of the bill. 

'OLYMPIC (Abe Jacobs, mgr. for Kohl & Castle). 
— The best exhibition of animal training seen 
here in a long time Is presented by Paul Sandor's 
Great Danes. Harry Tate and compony scored a 
substantial, artistic and laughing hit. 'Hie Pic- 
colo Midgets have an athletic act In which a good 
deal of comedy Is Interspersed. Mary Dupont and 
company In a comedy playlet, "Left at the Post," 
proved diverting. The numerous consistent situa- 
tions are well taken care of by the players. 
Mallory. Rrooks and Holllday in a musical act 
are refined and pleasing and do not overburden 
their instrumental numbers with useless comedy. 
J. A. Probst, whistler and Imitator, made a good 
Impression. McKay and Fredericks are newcomers 



to vaudeville, having for some time Illumined the 
cast of the LaSall? Theatre Btock company. They 
have a burlesque entitled "Fun at the Rail Game" 
which Is a caricature of the sport, with sufficient 
comedy lines, situations, singing and dancing to 
make the act a success. Barry and Watford's 
comedy act pleased. Hy Greenway In comedy 
Juggling creates laughter, while Kemp and Pearl, 
singing and dancing comedians, contribute their 
share In a pleasing manner. Edna Lorlmer Is a 
sweet singer, securing encores. Dave and Percle 
Martin In "Harvest Time" have a good comedy 
offering, while Dallou and Robson and the Mobile 
Trio are meritorious in their presentations. 

TROCADERO (I. M. Welngarden. mgr.).— Harry 
Hastings' "RIack Crook, Jr." is one of the new 
burlesque compunies playing the Eastern Wheel 
this season. "Oh. What u Night" has nothing 
to commend It, containing the usual number of 
comedians and chorus, with boisterous situations, 
while the closing piece. "The Midnight Supper." 
Is given over to the same purpose, with some good 
musical numbers rendered by Viola Sheldon and 
Amy Batter. A French pantomime, not on the 
program, and given by Harry Hastings and several 
others. Is suggestive and morbid. It pleased the 
audience to the point of curious laughter. Harry 
Hastings does some clever character acting in a 
sketch with Viola Sheldon. Banks and Newton 
are ambitious and with some good material, to- 
gether with their excellent dancing, ought to have 
a pleasing act. Curtis and Adams have good 
German dialect. The show closes here. 

EUSON'S (Sid J. Enson. mgr.).— Euson's has 
"Miss Dodo's Reception" and "The Spanish Bull- 
Fighters" for this week. The musical numbers 
are attractive and the company, including Harry 
Harvey, Chris Lane. Camllle Kenyon and Deda 
Walker, are admirable in their parts. In the olio 
are DuWall and Frwln. comedy acrobats; Dick 
Brown. Claude Rani*, and Amnio in a Parisian 
pantomime. The Foley Brothers were billed but 
did not appear. 

FOLLY (Empire Theatre Co., management). — 
The Empire Rurlesquers, with n coterie of comedi- 
ans and chorus girls, is the attraction. 

NOTES.— The Le Brun Grand Opera Trio, con- 
sisting of Antoinette lie Brun. Fritz N. Huttman 
and James F. Stevens, formerly connected with 
grand opera, will enter vaudeville the coming sea- 
son In a condensed version of "II Trovatore," 
which will have elaborate settings and scenic ef- 
fects. Peter F. Dailey and Lee Harrison, recently 
seen here In vaudeville, will Join the cast of "The 
Three Graces" at the Chicago Opera House this 
summer. If the Inducements are satisfactory. A 
deal is on now whereby the theatrical syndicate 
will have a new theatre and office building, to cost 
$|,. r »no.onn, according to Oeorge W. liCdercr, man- 
ager of the Colonial of this city, who represents 
Klaw & Krlanger in the transaction: and Alfred 
S. Trmle and the Letter estate, who own the 
property, which comprises the premises 7. r »-8.1 
Clark street, across the alley north of the Grand 
Opera House. 'Hie new structure will have six- 
teen stories and a frontage of 111 feet, with a 
depth of 100 feet, thus giving the new playhouse 
considerable space. The property ns It Is now Is 
put In at a value of about $1,000,000, and If the 
deal Is carried through the present buildings on 
the properties will be torn down next May and the 
new theatre completed about January. 1008. 

WIIITK CITY. -This popular resort, opening 
a week ahead of the others, entertains vast 
crowds of amusement seekers and all the diversi- 
fied attractions are the recipients of good patron- 
age. The Fire Show is an Interesting spectacle, 
while the new "Chicago Fire" exhibition, giving 
a realistic reproduction of the great conflagration, 
thrills the spectators. Rig Otto and his trained 
animals and Jewell's Manikins are interesting. 
Midget City, with its short population In pic- 
turesque appearance. Is n duplicate of the his- 
toric Catsklll retreat, showing In a peculiarly ar- 
ranged manner the famous village square of this 
Rip Van Winkle town with Imposing residences, 
miniature stores, engine house. Jail, theatre, 
public buildings and even a battlemented wall for 
defence In time of war. The Interiors of these 
buildings, which admit only the little people, are 
furnished complete, the decorations, showing the 
style of that period In the Woodwork. Kellar's 
blue room, the Catacombs, Hale's tours, Venice, 
vaudeville theatre, the coasters and other attrac- 
tions are receiving abundant attention. The illum- 
inated tower is an imposing structure and can be 
seen fur several miles on the south side. 

SANS BOUC1 PARK.— This park has liocn al 
most entirely rebuilt and a great amount of money 
must have lieen expended in providing new fea- 
tures In addition to those retained. The natural 
lawns, flower beds and shade trees make this re- 
sort one of the coziest to offer relaxation from the 
heat ami humidity. Resides the outdoor attrac- 
tions there is vaudeville In the remodelled theatre, 
the bill for this, the opening week, consisting of 
Harry W. Spingoh] and company In an entertain 
lug comedy sketch entitled "A Handsome 
Stranger." which scored a deserved success. 
Ferry Introduced his novel contortion act "In 
Fairyland." which Is sumptuous in setting and 
effects and brought forth laughter and applause. 
Rose and Kills, barrel Jumpers: Musical Cool 
mans and Roceo Vocco also appeared on the bill. 
R1VFRVTEW PARK. This, the largest park in 
the city given over to n museinents, has never 

inaiie stronger strides for popularity than this 
year, with its many Improvements and diverting 
summer enlertalnnienfs. One of the most sensa- 
tional as well as Instructive features Is the 

Igor rote Village. In which are installed about 
fifty natives In iheir scant savage costumes. The 
dedication ceremony attending the opening of this 
attraction, together with several other outdoor 
performances. w;is necessarily curtailed owing to 
the cohl weather. Ilohtimlr Kyrl and bis band 
contribute the lunslc program. 

CHI "IT'S. Francisco Posal's Raul and nuiner 
oils attractions I'pcliod this West Side park, which 
has been enlarged and made more comfortable to 
accommodate the amusement seeking multitude, 

The electric theatre and the new spectacle 
"Arabian Dreamland" are popular and seem to 
attract the most patronage. 

COLISEUM, This Immense building,' which Is 
usually given over to arena productions and other 
large shows, bus been converted Into a comfort- 



able garden und opened for the summer with 
Well's I '.and as the attraction. The splendid pro- 
gram of popular and classic numbers prepared by 
Director Well for the opening drew large crowds. 
Mamie Rockwell Is the soloist. 

FRANK WIKSRF.RO. 



The Chat. K. Harris Courier 

Devoted to the interests of Songs ond Singers. 

Address all communications to 

CHAS. K. HARRIS, 81 W. list It., N. T. 

(Meyer Cohen, Mgr.) 



CINCINNATI, 0. 

CHF.STEK PARK (I. If. Martin, mgr.).— The 
vaudeville hill this week is well balanced. Clayton 
ami Jenkins with their mule "Jasper" in The 
Darktown Circus have been seen here before. It 
was enjoyed by the ladies and children. Great 
llowlson, whistler and Imitator, one of the best 
turns of Its kind seen at this park. Fernando May 
Duo, musical artists, pleasing. Katheryn Maury, 
singing comedienne, food. Rergere Sisters, change 
artists, good. Next week: Hatch Rrothers, Mile. 
Duir. Kdward Glllen and Rootblack Quartet. 
NOTE.— -Lea Raroses cancelled, owing to death of 

one of the company. ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS 

iW. Draper, sec'y). — The attraction for tills week 
Is Patrick Conway's Ithaca Rand, which made Its 
first Cincinnati appearance. The programs were 
pleasing and except for the bad weather on the 
opening night the audiences were large and en 

thuslastlc. CONEY ISLAND. — The season 

opened with Roy Knabenshue and bis airship. 
Knahensliue made two attempts, but the wind and 
rain prevented a successful flight. Later In the 
week when the weather conditions were more 
fa voluble the ascent was made. In the vaudeville 
theatre a pleasing hill was offered. William 
Sclierer, trick violinist, scored a big bit. Pletro 
Romeo, vocalist, made his first vaudeville appear- 
ance and scored heavily. Juggling Austins, jug- 
glers, very good. LAGOON. — The opening was 

a success. In the vaudeville theatre Barney First. 
Hebrew comedian, had a good line of talk and 
scored hiavlly. Frevoli. magician, did a mixed 
act t lint pleased. Yvette. contortionist and 
dancer, good. Camillo and Forma, acrobats, did 
excellent hand balancing int. 

HARRY HKSS. 



Vol. 1 



New York. June 2. 1900. 



No. 3. 



COLUMBUS, 0. 

OLENTANGY PARK.— Week of 27: Dainty 
little Zena Keif made decided hit in singing and 
dancing stunt. Irvine and Iiconard had a very 
tunny automobile act that took well. Dunbar's 
herd of educated goats is another act that Is worth 
while. Harry Rotter and company contributed a 
good act entitled "A Matrimonial Rlizzard." 
Zinell and Routelle have a fair comedy and sing- 
week, again pleased. E. R. SPERRY. 



DEB MOINES, IA. 

KMIMRK (M. J. Karger. mgr.).- Week 27 June 
2: Rill consisting of Lydell Sisters and Rutter- 
worth. blackface singing and dancing trio; Ted 
K, Rox, comlque singer; Dane Claudius and Mel 
lody Scarlet In "A Study in Harmony"; Max L. 
l.andls. Impersonating Richard Mansfield ns "Dr. 
Jekyll and Mr. Hyde": Mile, Alllne. Juggler; 
Frank L. Perry, Frazer Comedy Four and moving 
pictures. Good performance to capacity business. 
INGKRSOI.L PARK , Fred Ruchanan, mgr.). 

opening week 127 June 2: llaveman's animals. 
consisting of leopards, lions. Iiears, etc., excellent; 
The Roscoe Midgets, clever little fellows; Willy 
Zimmerman, impersonator, good: The Rossaires, 
very good: Four Emperors of Music and moving 
pictures. A number of new concession! have been 
added since the fire, April 27. and the park now 
contain! Hale's Tours of the World, figure eight, 
roller coaster. Garden of the Gods, laughing gal- 
lery, electric merry-go-round end palm garden. 

Henry's Rand has been engaged. IOWANA 

PARK (W. R. Courier, mgr.).— Week 27 -June 2: 
Royal Opera Company In "Mascot." Good per- 
formance and business.-- NICKKLD0M (G. A. 
GetchelL mgr.). — Moving pictures and Illustrated 
songs. Business good. 
Tablofs "Fighting the 
show and played to good 
pices of the Elks. Great 
for June 4, ami the town 
for Rlngllng Rrothers. 



UNDER CANVAS.— 

Flames." 2«-L , !». Good 
business under the aus- 
Wallace Show is hilled 
is covered with paper 
II. V. REAVER. 



EAST0N, PA. 

ISLAND PARK (D. F. Seguine, mgr.). Des- 
pite the (old large crowds have been the rule 
week of 28, Three shows on 90th. Lorette, the 
dancing Juggler, well known in Beaton, went big: 
M< akin and Jordan, singing and dancing acrobatic 
comedians, well received; Klllott and Neff, eccen- 
tric comedy duo, pleased-; Joe Belmont, the 

human bird, proved his right to title: The Chad 
wick Trio excellent sketch entitled "Uncle Hank's 
Holiday," during which Ida May did some splen- 
did lank dancing: CaUH ion and Top-do in the 
"Enchanted Grotto" use their own scenery ami 
effects and do some clever work. Pictures closed. 
— UNDER CANVAS. Hie Rlngllng Rrothers 
paid their first visit to this city on 2S In one of 
the worst storms we hive had Oils year. Nol 
withstanding this facl the scheduled parade and 
perf* nuances were given. About IP.ooo people 
saw I he circus. MAC. 



EVANSVILLE. IND. 

COOKS PARK (Harry I.aurame. mgr). Rill 
week May 27 Is: Hatch Brothers, musical comedy, 
fair. Howard and hinder, German comedians, 
well received. Woods ami Woods, light wire, 
good act. Collins and l.al'.cllc. dancers, good. 
Kdward Gllleti. comedy juggler, made a lilt. 
Klnetoscope closed with good views. The free 
attraction is the Hying aerial art of the Genett 
Sisters, who were good OAK SUMMIT PARK 

(Edwin F- Oalllgan. mgr.), This park opens 
June :: with the following vaudeville hill: Swor 
Rrothers, Lena Davenport, Stewart ami Kellcy, 
Ben Tut pin. I*em and Wilson. Newell ami coin 
pany and the Klnodrouie. The park attraction-; 
are many. Mr. Galligan was formerly manager 
of "York State Folks" and Is well known In 
ilils elty. N'ttTi:. Knos Harrison, an employee 

of Sun Bros, who recently showed here, died at 
a local hospital from an injury received when 
striking the teut. 



Miss Cora Gray, of 
whom mention has 
been made before In 
these columns, contln- 
m s to meet with great 
success at Lynn, Mass. 
Am one of her well de- 
served press notices 
states, "Miss Cora 
Grav. a shapely come- 
dienne, has some very 
tuneful songs of the 
right sort with the 
right kind of a voice 
to sing them. Her 
singing of 'Mother, 
I'ln a Rose on Me.' 
and 'Mother's Got 
the Habit Now' Is 
well worth the price 
of admission alone." 
There Is no doubt, 
with proper manage- 
ment, Miss Orsy will 
In a short while be 
one of the Broadway 
stars, as she has 
everything In her 
favor. 

Miss Marie Rrackman 
continues to meet 
W I t h great success 
with her beautiful 
rendition of "Dream- 



ing. Love of You," 
and "Just One Word 
of Consolation." 

Once again we want to 
call your particular 
attention to the great 
Song. "Somewhere." 
Don't fsll to write for 
It If you have not re- 
celved a copy. 
"Jimmy, Mamie, 
Marie, all think It's 
great! Also Msud, 
who has been sending 
It to her friends, rec- 
ommending the song 
as a good tonic for the 
blues." 

James Aldrich Llbbey 
at Dlnghamton, N. Y., 
tiie past week, haa 
been receiving an ova- 
tion at every per- 
formance, singing 
"Somewhere." If you 
are a vocalist of any 
kind, you can receive 
the same applause by 
using this song. As 
It is bound to be the 
only ballad hit on the 
market this season, 
don't fall to get It at 
once. 



FORT DODGE, IA. 

MIDLAND (C. F. Pedersen. mgr.).— Tim Mur- 
phy. 27, in "Rufus Rugg" pleased a large audi 
nice. nils attraction closes theatre for the 

season. NOTES.— Sells-Floto Shows, 18 to 9, 

capacity business. Due: Forepaugh Sells, June 
2S. G. W. TRBMAIN. 



GL0VER8VILLE, H. Y. 

FAMILY (Fred De Rondy, res. mgr.).— Week 
2K: Hellman the Great, magician, fairly clever. 
Katherlne Ryan, awkward appearance and a "par 
|o. voice," but well liked. Marcus Adell and com- 
pany. The Three Masons (sec New Acts), and 
Signor and SIgnora Galata, whose voices do not 
blend, were also there. Motion pictures good. 

THE AISLE SEAT FIEND. 



GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

RAMONA (I* Delamarter. mgr.). Week May 27: 
Rph Thompson's trained elephants were held over 
Sunday. As a hcadllner The Kxposltion Four pre- 
sent a good musical act. Dan Sherman and Mabel 
De Forrest In "The Fall of Port Arthur" have a 
skit that is full of comedy. They were well re- 
ceived. Becmer Courpell and Juggling Girls 
moved up from flic Grand this week with their 
club swinging act. Fred Wycoff. late of the Busy 
l/./.y company, presents a clever rural comedy 
entitled "Plain Folks." The Great Le Pagea have 
a novel Jumping act. Jolly Ceorgla O'Ramey 
made a good impression as a character comedienne. 
The Ramonagraph closed. GRAND OPERA 
HOUSE <K. C. Rurroughs. res. mgr.). -Week 27: 
Edward Lunelle opened with a neet wire act. 
Arthur Righy has a fair monologue. Jennings and 
Renfrew, blackface comedians, made a good lin 
picssioti. De Vere and De Vere In songs and 
dances and Armstrong and Verne made good. 
Ktnodrome closed the hill. This house is still do- 
ing a good business ami will keep o|h-ii as long as 
the business keeps up. N'OTK. -Captain Ro- 

kins' airship Columbia, which is still at Rsmona 
Athletic Perk and which fulled to go up last 
week, is being remodelled to make a flight this 
week. Captain Roklns and his airship were 
hooked for Saginaw, but lie cancelled. 

C. H. HALLMAN. 

JAMESTOWN. N. Y. 

< HI/ORON (J. J. Waters. mgr.). Season 
tpeic-d week 28, Duryea and Mortimer presented 
a sketch, "The Imposter," which pleased. The 
Three Msrecnoe are clever acrobats and equilib- 
rists. Met 'tea and Poole did some good shooting. 
Johnny Johns, blackface monologlst, seemed to 
phase, as did Charlotte George with her songs. 
I..-- Belle, comedy Juggler, does some new and also 
some old stunts. NOTES. After much delib- 

eration Mr. Waters, local manager Of the Samuels 
opera House, was appointed manager of the park 
I heat re In place of .lule Delmar. The Royal 
Vienna Band has been engaged for the season at 
Celoion Park and gave Its first concert 27. Ring 
ling Brothers' Circus romea to Warren June 8. 

L. T. BERLINER. 

JERSEY CITY. N. J. 

ItoN TON (T. W. Dlnklns. mgr). Week 20\ 
W. ft. Watson's Rurlesipicrs played to good busl 
ne-s. The closing burlesques, "Miss Clover" snd 
"The I'.a-diful Venus," were well received. In the 
olio w. B. Watson. German comedian, did well. 
Swan and Raiubaid. acrobatic comedians, were 
well received, as was Madge Rlngle. Yamamoto 
Brothers, Japanese wire and perch artists, were 
the hit. Ltxette Howe, comedienne, well received. 
NOTES. This Is the closing week of the 
house; it will open again the last week In August. 
Imring the summer many Improvements will be 
made. Monday evening the annual benefit of 
Jersey City [<odgc No. 24, T M. A., was given at 
A< itdciu.x of Mus|c and notwithstanding the Stormy 
weather there Was a full house, many- people com- 
ing in carriages. The heedllners on the bill were: 
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Murphy In "The Coal Strike," 



12 



VARIETY 



Songs That Win on Their Merits 



M 

o 

»-• 
3 
43 
U 

43 



to 

a 






Professional 

Deparlmenl 



HARRY JONES 
THOS. KELLY 
JOE McNATTI 



o 

o 

B 

a 

H 
W 



3* 



*- - 



Hummer theatre opens this week. Rig Spring 
Ci.vnlval In full swing. LB1 J. LOGAN. 



FRANCIS, DAY & HUNTER 

15 WEST 30th STREET, NEW YORK 



28: Tbls Is closing week at this lions? and the 
Moonlight Maids arc here. The hurlettas "A Night 
at Newport" and "A Diamond Palace" go well 
and introduce good singing and dancing. 'Hie olio 
very well received: the popular Jersey City burl 
lone, John A. Driscnll, sang, using pictures; Helen 
Trlx. singing and whistling Southern melodies, was 
popular: Frank Fogarty. the "Duhlin minstrel," 
did well: The Wangdoodle Four, colored, were 
funny; Will and LIU Ilartel, musical act, good; 
Frank Ross, Hehrew lni|H»rsonator, told stories and 
sang, belag wo 'l received. Hrooklyn, Newark. 
New York and Jersey City Lodges, T, If. A., will 
have Joint meeting at Jersey City to consider date 
and plan of holding Annual Field Day; this Is to 
l»e a sort of family picnic, intended to better ac- 
quaint the members of the various nearby lodges 
with one another. PETE. 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 
FOREST PARK (Lloyd Rrown, mgf.).— Attend- 
ance lit this park continues to be big. notwith- 
standing the cold weather fore part week 27. The 
Royal Hungarian Hussar Rand opened with two 
dally concerts Sunday, 27. Mine. Romano has 
been engaged for another week as soloist. At 
Hopkins' Theatre I>onlse Rrehany, operatic so- 
prano, was the hit of the bill. The Three Dierlck 
Rrothers. European strong men, perform novel 
feats of strength. Francesea Redding appears in 
a sketch by Will Cresgy entitled "Her Friend 
from Texas." Powell, the magician, performs a 
number of mystifying tricks. A hern and Raxter 
are comedy acrobats. Mile, de Sarema's animals 
are the open-air free attraction. It is a splendid 
animal exhibition along original lines. The 
Johnstown Flood opened this week, making an ad- 
ditional attraction to this popular park. ELEC- 
TRIC PARK.— Ellery's Band continues to render 
very attractive selections, to judge from the num- 
ber of people who go expressly to hear this excel- 
lent band. The vaudeville program In the German 
village was excellent, including Verdeh, Perry and 
Wilbur, who sing, dance and play. Nettle Fields 
made a hit in singing specialty. Conley Sisters 
pleased. Hlbbard and Warren, black-face come- 
dians, won several laughs. THE CENTURY 

(Joseph Rarrett. mgr.). — Week 27 Is the close of 
1 lie season. The New Century Girls company was 
the attraction to big business. The musical bur- 
lesque on the play. "Raffles," was a big go. Olio 
Includes Edith Murray, called "the toy artist," 
who does a singing specialty; Ward and Raynor In 
a musical comedy: Dowen and Llna, horizontal bar 
performers: Stewart and Desmond in a sketch; 
Burton and Burton, singers. Barrett reports pros- 
perous season. FAIRPLAY. 



KEN08HA. WIS. 

BIJOU (John O'Hrlen, res. mgr. ). — George Austin 
In his comic wire act; Carrie Miller, the Cheyenne 
girl, pleases greatly. Ed and Kitty Dcagou In a 
comedy sketch entitled "A Caller," made a hit; 
Isabella Jensen, Illustrated songs; The Otara 
.Tapunese troupe of child contortionists, big hit 
The Pierces open in a refined musical act, intro- 
ducing up-to-date music; E. S. Barbour, liuper 
sonator, wins applause. Mr. and Mrs. Hobby Car 
roll In their unique railroad lunchroom scene and 
mechanical effects go well. Jack King is an il- 
lustrated song alnger of merit. Olney and Cun- 
ningham in a clever sketch entitled "Jlu .Iltsu" 
make a hit. A. NICHOLS. 



KEWANEE, ILL. 

BIJOU (M. Newman, mgr.).— Bill week 28 In- 
cluded: Hart, magician, fair; The Llppencotts, 
big hit; Hurdle Langdon, strong hit; Eward Hart, 
Mile. Ressie ami company, comedy act. made lilt. 
Motion pictures. C. A. COLEMAN. 



LEAVENWORTH, KAN. 

PEOPLE'S (Charles Cunningham, mgr.). --Week 
27: Good bill and large business. Ned Norton 
In songs and monologue has a clever delivery and 
brings out the laughs. Del-A Phone, mimic, 
gets \ill there Is in the way of applause; a splen- 
did act. The Kingsbury s In a musical sketch arc 
gOOd; the Three Wizards In a slack wire act. In- 
troducing some novel features never seen here. 
lire easily the hit of the bill. Clarence Haslet 
in illustrated songs, good as ever. The People- 
scope— Sbii Francisco disaster. NOTES.— Th e 



LITTLE BOCK, ARK. 
FOREST PARK (C. T. Taylor. mgT.).— Week 
21: Mack and Elliott. Cole and Cole, Casey and 
!/• Clair, Paul Rrachard and Harry Prince to 
good business. Week 28* Martlnettle and Syl- 
vester and Cora Youngblood Carson, Ball and 
Sargent. Vincent Kiralfo, Ball and Doerts and 
Harry Prince. Helen May Buttler Military 
Rinss Rand. C. H. DUTTLINGER. 

LOGANSPORT. IND. 

CRYSTAL (Tom Hardle, res. mgr.).— Burke 
ami ITrllne, automobile girls, well received: Edw. 
Poulter. monologlst. had 'cm laughing; Phil Con- 
ner, illustrated songs, good; The Lynns, sketch 
artists, a scream: Klnodrome. Capacity business. 

DOWLING (J. B. Howling, mgr.)— Richard 

Walsh, musical moke, very good; Hon and Mae 
Cordon, comedy cyclists, a hit; Charlotfe Ra- 
ver.ccroft. violinist and vocalist; Melray Trio, re- 
ceived applause. Ruslness good. REVILO. 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 

FONTAINE FERRY PARK (William Relehman. 
mgr.). — Week 27: Marco Twins are the headllners 
on the bill and are grotesque comedians. Some 
clever comedy keeps the audience laughing. Lee 
Hawkins has a lot of new and original sayings 
and some parodies which are up to date. The 
Frederick Trio of acrobats are a new one here. 
Tbe male member of the trio displays a mass of 
muscles and does lifting with his teeth. The rent 
of the act Is fair Flo Adler, assisted by her son. 
sang several catchy songs and responded to four 
encores. Hathaway and Selgel have a novelty 
singing and dancing act. Both are fair dancers. 

NOTES. - Rosatl's Italian Rand is again the 

musical attraction for the free concert, having 
proven to be a favorite with the patrons of the 
park. Miss Nellie Turnwall. the soloist, scores a 
hit. CHARLES SYLVESTER. 



MONTREAL. 

RIVERSIDE PARK (Al E. Read, mgr.).— Week 
27 opened a splendid vaudeville bill. Zimmer- 
man's band concert took well. The feature is 
Miller's elephants. Selhinl and Grovini have good 
act. The Sldontas showed a clever act and were 
well received. LeRoy and Lavanion. comic bar 
and knockabout artists, were go-id. Average at- 
tendance. 5.000. SOHMER PARK (Lavlgne A 

Lalole. mgrs.L — Week 27: Lavlgne's band concert 
is holding well. The feature Is the Three Nevaros. 
They show a difficult and exceedingly clever turn 
and went big. Meyers and Ro*a have a richly 
costumed juggling act and went big. Kenyon and 
He Garmo present a perch act that la above the 
average. The Schwartz Family were artists, clever 
and took well. Roclmn Brothers, singers, and the 
Irwlne Family, singers and daneers, took well. 
This bill opens the park for two shows dally for 
season, with new attractions weekly. Average at- 
tendance. 5.000. ROYAL (H. C. Egerton. mgr.). 

— Week 28 opened by Nettie Grant's London 
Oalety Girls to fair business. Pat White, come- 
dian, and company In "Way Out West" and 
• "Mixing Things Up" showed new songs and 
dances. Olio feature is the Vedmans, comedy 
acrobats and bar performers, went big. William- 
son and Gilbert, eccentric comedians, took well. 
Bailey Rrothers and Conners. singers and dancers, 
are good. Adams and Swinburne. "The Ginger 
Olrls." are favorites. Emma O'Nell was liked In 
a refined singing act. This chorus, with new olio 
features weekly, will play stock burlesques here 

from June 4 Indefinitely. ACADEMY OF 

MUSIC. Week 28 opened by Richard and Pren- 
gle's Georgia Minstrels to fair business. "Re- 
ception by Colored Aristocracy" first part. Clar- 
ence Powell, comedian; Fred Simpson, trombone 
soloist: Arthur Prince, hoop roller; Christian and 
Johnson, roller skaters: Frank Kirk, acrobatic 
tramp and imitator, and Marsh Craig, contortion- 
ist, comprise the olio. The after piece was good. 

Altogether a clean, clever performance. NOTES. 

— Miss El Salto, contortionist, la booked with Gas- 
porel Rrothers Repertoire Company to open June 
7. Syracuse. Miller's elephants are to feature at 
Ontario Reach. Rochester, from here. 

AL M. PRENTISS. 



MUSKOGEE, IND. 

LYRIC (Fred Scheruhcl. mgr.). Opening week 
14: Mile. Rrachard. globe roller and Juggler; 
Van and Hunt, musical; Rrummage and Clark, 
«• iiudy sketeli. Ruslness good for first season of 
vnuileville. Week May 21: Jennie De Wesse. trick 
violinist and banjoist, good; Tegge and Daniels, 
German-American comedians, pleasing; The Two 
Nharrocks, singing ami dancing and second sight 
maivels. (food crowds every night. Week 28. 
Vor.tello and Nina, posing and physical culture 
artists; Jennie Raleigh, vocalist and monologlst. 
HYDE PARK (Pat Lnvey. mgr.)— Week May 

21: Mediocre bill to only fair business. IIIN- 

'ION (W. M. Hlnton, mgr.).— Week May 28: 
North Rrothers, comedians. W. II. II. C. 

NEWARK, N. J. 

PROCTOR'S (R. C. Stewart, mgr.).— Week 28: 
Viola and Engel, working on the style of Rice and 
Pitvost. fair. The Three Cartmells went well. 
Ruth Mien and company In a sketch entitled "The 
Girl*' made the hit of the performance. Miss 
Allen. Just closed with "The Strength of the 
Weak" company. Harry Rraham In facial mimic- 
ry was -rood. Watson Ilntchings and company In 
the "Vaudeville Exchange" play a return date 
and are making good. Hcnglcr Sisters the same. 
Lew Bully In a bench of talk and two new songs 
of his own composition was the laughing hit. 
The RiirU'r-Ritchlc Trio, comedy cyclists, Intro- 
duced good riding and comedy which pleased the 
large audiences which were the rule during the 
week. Next week: Carter De Haven and Flo 
Parker, Rlocksom and Rums, Simon and Gardner. 
Taylor Holmes, Ahdel Kader, Morton and Diamond. 
One Leonard, Maude Lambert and motion pictures. 

WALDMANN'S (W. S. Clark, mgr.).— Week 

brings forth the Nlnners, comedians; La Relle 
Marm in poses, good; Isabella Hurd, soprano, very 



good; Dunn and Waldron In a funny sketch; the 
Marrlot Twins, cyclists, were also good. This 

has been a prosperous season for thla house. 

ELECTRIC PARK (C. A. Dunlop. mgr.).— Week 
28: The spectacle "Mt. Vesuvius," the electric 
fountain with living pictures and other attractions 
are drawing big crowds. The dancing pavilion b« 
a feature. The show Includes the Mauhasset 
Comedy Four, Rose and Clausen, O'Rourke and 
Gillian, Woods and Green; Nellie V. Nichols goes 
verv well; Albertyn's acrobats and Victoria Park- 
ers dog circus. OLYMPIC PARK (liana Wea- 
ver, mgr.). — Week 28: The Aborn Opera Company 
playing "The Mascot" this week to overflow 
crowds. The performance Is under the direction 
of Howard Cook. _Mr Aborn will play three of the 

Other companies at the park this season. HILI/- 

SIHE PARK (William Thaller, mgr.).— Week 28: 
Miss Olive Swan and her Wild West Show arc 
doing well this week and will continue at the 
park for several weeks. Resides Miss Swan there 
are Nebraska Rill, M'lnnle Fisher. Prof. Archie 
Qriffen, the balloon a*censlonlst. who will make 
parachute leaps, and others. JOE O'RRYAN. 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

ATHLETIC PARK (A. Cox. mgr.).— Rest bill 
of the season for week 28. Casey and Le Clair, 
with an act similar to that of Mr. and Mrs. 
Maik Murphy, are In a class by themselves, and 
will be topping bills in the near future. Berger 
Rrothers should do a straight acrobatic act. Their 
attempted comedy work detracts. Better dress- 
ing would be an Improvement. Harry Ferguson 
in a "Hooligan" make-up and Lulu Reeson, win- 
ner of the R. K. Fox medal for dancing, offer 
"The Arrival of His I/ordship." Ferguson's raw 
parodies should be elminated. The dancing of 
Miss Reeson holds up the act. Clogs would i>e 
preferable to sand. Two Franelseos, comedy magi- 
cians, excellent. Pictures close. Arabian horses 
form an excellent outdoor attraction. Ruslness :s 
fair. WEST ENH PARK (Thomas S. Win- 
ston, mgr.). -Week 27: Lindstrom and Anderson 
in their rube acrobatic specialty scored an em- 
phatic hit. Their gestures and makeup are con- 
vincing. The voices of Mr. and Mrs. Waterous 
seem to improve each succeeding year. They 
were forced to beg their way off. Melville and 
Coi.way and Musical Forrosts are held over. 
Fischer's Rand rendered popular and classical Se- 
lections to generous applause. Pictures showed 
" 'Frisco Horror." Rill June .'{ contains Count He 
Rutz and Brother, Lopez and I»i»ez. Mr. and 

Mrs. Waterous nnd Lindstrom and Anderson. 

NOTES. — Work has actively In trim on the Rrooke 
Winter Garden, Pain's Fall of Port Arthur closes 
in this city on June 4 to 
1'sher has been appointed 
Park. 



fair business. Jake 

treasurer of Athletic 

O. M. SAMUEL. 



OAKLAND, CAL. 

RELL (Abe Cohn. mgr.).— May 21: Kelly and 
Violette head the bill this week and were well re- 
ceived on Monday evening. Musical Rentley (re- 
turn date) scored big hit. Rurke Rrothers. one 
nf the best club Juggling acts seen out here, made 
n big lilt. Roth well Browne's Gaiety Girls and 
pictures complete the show. Capacity business. 

NOVELTY (Guy Smith, mgr.).— Dick Mack; 

Weston and Hathaway; Mabel Howard: Crouch 
and Richards; Gllroy. naynes and Montgomery 
(second week) and pictures. Rig business. 

B. H. C. 



PAWTUCKET, R. I. 

NEW PAWTUCKET (J. W. Capron, mgr.).— 
Week 28: It seenis like regular winter business 
tills week. Lole Livingston sings well; Hilton, 
the Hebrew Juggler, has a lot of good comedy: 
Ida (Sunt her, good; Ferguso.i and Hupree, very 
pleasing; The Wtnstanteys, who took the place of 
the Ra sorts (cancelled), as good as ever.— — 
KEITH'S (C. E. Lovenberg. mgr.).— This 
house opened up 28 as a nickel show, giv- 
ing continuous performances from 10:fU> a. m. to 
10:30 p. m.. consisting of moving pictures and 
illustrated songs, with change of program every 
Monday and Thursday. Mather Reimic is singing 
the songs with great success. Brother Charles 
Duffy, of Ijocal 2.1, has charge of the picture ma- 
chine. Douses have been quite good. NICK. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

KEITH'S (H. T. Jordan, mgr.).— Seldom have 
K'ith patrons been permitted to witness a more 
ev» nly balanced or more entertaining bill than 
the one given this week. The feature was 
"Under th<> Third Degree," a protean play with 
William Courtlelgh, adapted by Camplieli Mae- 
( 'ul lech from a short story In French by Em lie 
M'lllerande called "The Revenge of John Mclot," 
also the subject from which de Vries' "A Case of 
Arson" was taken. Courtlelgh essays eight char- 
acters, and his work Is clean cut and pleasing. 
The phi vlet allows Mr. Courtlelgh to display ills 
versatility. The sketch "A Friend's Advice." 
given by Nina Morris, Arthur Hoopes and Phillip 
Sheffield, might lie called amusing. Miss Morris 
was pleasing In most that she did. Ed Reynard, 
the ventriloquist, won deserved recalls. The me- 
chanical workings are the feature and they are 
refreshing. Walter C. Kelly, in a recital of a 
session In a Virginia court house nnd several 
dihlect stories, made his act a laughing success. 
Irving Jones was well received with his songs. 
Lillian Shaw carried off the palm among the 
women with Hinging and Imitations. Susie Fisher 
ulso pleased with songs. The Three Dumonds 
repeated their musical act, but a change Is needed 
and there Is enough ability shown to warrant the 
relief that something new and equally as good 
might easily be secured. Mile. Chester and her 
stntue dog nnd the Four Lnkens added to the 
success of the bill. Salmon and Chester In coster 
s'.ngs, Henry and Francis in "The New Janitor." 
and the Roldens. a singing nnd dancing couple, 
were new and did well enough. Hills and Wilson 
gave eccentric dancing act which was well re- 
ceived. The Tanakas and the Klnetograph rounded 
out an unusually entertaining program. The pres- 
ent week winds up the regular "Wheel" season In 
this city. "The Yankee Doodle Girls" have been 

seen here twice before this season. TROCA- 

DERO.— Rltter and Foster, reviewed under New 



JUST rUU ■ IDEAS 

A small room in the big house 

Remick's, 45 W. 28th St. 

ED. ROSE writes 

ACTS 

FOR RELIABLE PEOPLE 



LOOK &~ Parodies— 4 Absolute 
Knockouts on the Very Latest 
Hits. 



Acts, featured a weak olio, which included George 
Shady, Douglass, Day and McAvoy, and the Laur- 

ents. NOTES.— Manager Fred Wilson will start 

the contractors t> work Improving the Trocadero In 
a short time. Manager Dawson promises something 
rare in the way of "stock burlesque" at the 
Rljou, beginning next week. Willie Weston added 
an imitation of Lord "Kid" Broad to his list 
when playing here, but only tried It once. Lord 
Broad happened to be In the theatre when Weston 
tried it and Willie could have given Keller lessons 
ii doing a vanishing act during his stay here. 
S-i'Me Huested is going to play dates this stun- 
ner with tieorge (Juhl. The latter did a sketeli 
with Anna Yale after the Yale-Huested coiubin.t- 
tion was dissolved during the "Yankee Doodle 
Girls" season. Harry Newman, looking happy 
mid prosperous, was in town all week, lie goes 
with Diuklns again next season. KINKS'. 



PITT8BURG, PA. 

THE GRAND (Harry Davis, mgr.).— John T. 
Thorns and (Jrace Carlton are two successful laugh 
inducers. Mr. Thornton's comedy Is full of unctu- 
ous humor. The Five PlroseolHs give a good 
comedy juggling act. Melville Ellis made an em- 
phatic hit In his musical monologue. James Kier- 
n.iii appears in "The Taming of the Reast," a 
fairly funny playlet with pleasing songs and 
dances. He Is assisted by Thomas Kleman In a 
character Impersonation. Stella Reardsley sings 
well and Nellie Rly, in Irish character, was good. 
Dean Edsall and Arthur Forbes are doing the 
Frank Keenan farce and are responsible for some 
of the fun in the bill. Cliff Gordon, the German 
comedian, as usual makes a hit. Mr. and Mrs. 
Jack Dayman do well with "The New Stenogra- 
pher," and even better In a song or two. Hayes 
and Healy have some new business in their act 
and the little fellow makes a screaming hit In bis 
burlesque. Laurel Ordway. excellent; Ralph Post 
and Ed Russell, clever In grotesque dancing and 
comedy; Herbert Deveau, in chalk talk and other 

features, round out the bill. THE GAYETY 

(James E. Orr, mgr.).— Crowded houses are greet- 
ing the "Golden Crook" company during this the 
last week of the season. "Forty-five Seconds on 
Rroadway" Is the name of the burletta, a bur- 
lesque on George M. Cohan's play. Ressie Phil- 
lips, who has a magnetic style, sang some songs 
1 hat took well. A ballet spectacle introducing the 
four seasons was a good feature. Ed Morton, a 
negro dialect singer, was well received. The 
Rrothers Ruch, acrobats, and the Fl-Fl Realities, 
show girls, got a good hand. Lillian Lawrence 
was the leader of a good chorus "Sporting Life," 
a little skit, introduced considerable comedy and 
ended witli a serious touch. Rlllie Arlington and 
(Jrace Del more present a humorous creation, "My 
Husband." Anna Kelly led the finale. "The 
Golden Crook" grand march. MME. PITT. 



PORTSMOUTH, 0. 

THE ORPHBUM (Charles Rabin, mgr.).— Petite 
Tulsa. "The Girl with the Rig Black Eyes." Is 
good In her character changes, but her last turn 
she kills by getting too gay with the boys. Fltz- 
liugh and Ressie L*e, pleasing. Cliff Dean and 
company make laughs. Guv Stone, illustrated 

song singer, good. Moving pictures, only fair. 

CASINO (Fred C. Hlglev, mgr.).— The theatre at 
Millbrook Park opened this week to big business 
the first night. The company is a well-balanced 
one and their opening bill, "The Bachelor's Honey- 
moon," was well received. 

ROY McELHANEY. 



PUEBLO, COL. 

EARL (G. If. Morris, mgr.).— Week 28: Gilbert 
Sim id/ and Company, travesty on "Camille." 
Ileum, Clark and Franklin, comedy musical act. 
Mi any and Anderson, rural comedy sketch. Jay 
Roger t, monologue. Tommy Hayes. Oscar Walsh 
and others. Fine attendance week 21. — LAKE 
MINNEQUA PARK (Joe Glass, mgr.).— Week 28: 
Dramatic stock Company and park attractions. 
Large attendance week 21. E. D. SCOTT. 



TOPEKA, KAN. 

NOVELTY (A. II. Hagan, mgr.).— Rig business 
rules. The moving pictures of the San Francisco 
disaster are the leading features and draw crowds. 
Mr. Hagan is compelled to give an extra perform- 
ance each night. This house will close for the 
season June 4 and will reopen the latter part of 

August. STAR (Harry I^ewls, mgr.). — Ruslness 

Is satisfactory to the management. Tills house 

will also close for the season In a few weeks. 

AIKHOME (Crawford & Kane, mgrs.).— The air- 
dome has Just opened for the season, but business 
is very poor so far, the weather being the cause. 

Another tented theatre has entered the field 

here, known as II. D. R ticker's Famous Korak 



VARIETY 



13 



VAUDEVILLE AGENTS 



\ 



WILLIAM MORRIS 

1440 BROADWAY, Corner 40th St., NEW YORK 

Telephone 053, 054, 055 Bryant. Cable Address, Wlllmorrls. 

CHICAGO O FFICE: 167 Dea rborn Street 

SPECIAL ATTENTION WILL BE GIVEN TO SUMMER PARKS AND FAIRS 



Booking for the Representative Vaudeville Theatres of America 

Booking Exclusively the Following Leading Vaudeville Houses • 



P. G. Williams* Colonial. 
P. O. Williams' Orpheum. 
P. O. Williams' Aluambra. 
P. O. Williams' Novelty. B'klyn. 
P. Q. Williams' Gotham. B'klyn. 
P. G. Williams' Bergen Beach. 
Henry Myers' Doric, Yonkers. 
Henry Myers' Atlantic City. 
Henry Myers' Doric, Camden. 
J&eeney's, Brooklyn. 
Morrison's, Hock a way. 
Beta* ting's, Rock a way. 
International, Chicago. 
Hippodrome. Cleveland. 
Mn union's Park, St. Loula. 
Cedar Point, Sandusky. 



Hammerstein's Victoria. 
Hammerstein's Roof Garden. 
Sheedy'a, Fall River. 
Sheedy's, Newport. 
Hatliaway's, New Bedford. 
Hathaway's, Lowell. 
Hatliaway's, Brockton. 
Bijou, Lincoln, Neb. 
Gennett's, Richmond, Ind. 
Grand Op. Hse., Decatur, 111. 
New Savoy, Hamilton, Ont. 
Electric Park, Toledo. 
Electric Park, Detroit. 
Electric Park, Cleveland. 
Electric Park, Baltimore. 



Wilmer and Vincent, Utlca. 
Wilmer and Vincent, Reading. 
Wilmer and Vincent, Allentown. 
Weber and Rush, Bingbamton. 
Weber and Rush, Schenectady. 
H. H. Umkin's, Toledo. 
H. H. Lamkln's, Dayton. 
Katies' Auditorium, Lynn. 
I. 0. Mishler, Altoona, Pa. 
I. C. Mishler, Johnstown, Pa. 
Manhattan Beach, Denver. 
Cook's Park, Evansville. 
Forest Park, Little Rock. Ark. 
Brltannla-on-the-Bay, Ottawa, Ont. 
Chester Park. Cincinnati. 
Woolworth's Uf.Cdn, Lancaster, Pa. 



IN. B. It le Important that artiete send their open time to 
both the New York and Chicago Offices 



Tsl. 1487 Bryant. Cable. "Control," New York. 

The Agents' Agency 

CLIFFORD C. FISCHER 

1440 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 
HOLLAND BUILDING. 

B. BUTLER BOYLB. MATHIAS R. TUFTS. 

THE BOYLE AGENCY 

INTERNATIONAL 
VAUDEVILLE AND DRAMATIC 

81 West Slat Street, NEW YORK. 

Cable Address, "Butleboyl," New York. 
Tel. 4075, Md. Sq. 

IDA CARLE 

Vaudeville Agent, St. James Building. 



Tel. 6004 Madison. 



lngersoll8L Hopkins (o. 

llSt BROADWAY, N. T. CITY. 

Amusement Park Agents 

New York Representative 
Howard Athenaeum, Boston, Mass. 

AL. MAYBR 

Vaudeville Agent 

Room 608, St. James Building 

B way and 86th Street, New York. 

Tel. 8847 Madison. 



BORNHMUPT TSBn"* *"- 

St. James Bldg. Tel. 4654 Mad. Sq., New York. 

CHAS. ESCHERT 

with Al Sutherland, St. James Building. 
Booking only good sets. 



Tsl., 4967 Madison 
B. A 



Cable, Myersba 
E. 8. 



MYERS-KELLER 

General Vaudeville Agents 

31 West 31st Street, New York 

•Phone, 2632 Madison 

REICH, 

PLUNKETT 
* WESLEY 

ST. JAMES BUILDING 

Subscribe now 

and be sure of 

VARIETY 



If A DU A II Theatrical Syndicate, Theatrical 
HHrnflll A Vaudeville Manager* 

1285 and 1931 Broadway, New York. 

Anything There's a Dollar In 

JAGK LEVY 

140 West 42d St. New York 

H. B. MARINELLI 

NEW YORK PARIS LONDON 

Cable, Cable, Cable, 

"Helferslch" "Uptodate Paris" "Bravissimo—Londun" 

HOLLAND BUILDING. 1440 BROADWAY. 
TELEPHONE : 8084 BRYANT. 

FRANK MELVILLE 

KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING 

SUMMER AMUSEMENTS KS 

CONSTRUCTION AND THEATRICAL 
ATTRACTIONS 



Pitrot&Girard 

International Vaudeville Agents. 
1263 Broadway, New York 

TeL. 4S1B Msilaaa . 

W.J.PIimmer 

Exclusive booking- agent for all attractions play- 
ing the Empire Circuit. Address Knickerbocker 
Theatre Building Annex, Rooms 720 to 727. 

Alex. Steiner 

VAUDEVILLE AGENT 

Booking Foreign asi Native Acta. 



8T. J 



Tftll 



Wonder Co.; It is drawing good crowds and pnts 
on some good arts in the way of a repertoire 
show at ten cents admission. The Wallace shows 
are booked here for 80. The city council has 
passed a special ordinance at the request of the 



old soldiers not to permit the show to perform 
here on that date, but Mr. Wullaoe says he will 
show here, us lie lias a license. It Is not known 
exactly what the outcome will t>e. 

LOUIS II. FRIEDMAN. 



PASTOR'S 

14TH ST. AND 8D AVE. 
NEXT WEEK, MONDAY, JUNE 4. 



THE MIMIC FOUR 
Selviui and Grovini, Col. Magnus 

M. E. Nlbbe and Marie 

Bordouex, 
The Holds worths. 
The Weston Sisters, 
Miss Annie Chandler, 
Flatow and Dunn, 



Schults' 
Dogs, 
Barnes and Stockwell, 
Elmer Jerome, 
Fred C'osgrove, 
The Maurleescope, 
The American Vltagraph, 



And, as au added attraction! 

TOM AND EDITH ALMOND, 

European Novelty Music and Dancing Act 

PROCTOR'S 

BEST SHOWS IN TOWN 

BEGINNING NEXT MONDAY AND AU. WEEK 

232 



'ST. 

Mats. Dally, 
IB, 25. 

Phone 1020 
Chelsea. 

1255? 

Mats. Dally, 
All Seats. 
15. 25. 

Phone 1240 

Harlem. 



Ail-Star Vaudeville. 
HENRY LEE, 5-LE CUSIONS-5. 
Smith & Campliell, Lasky, Rolfe 
Quintet, etc. Nights, 15, 25, 
35, 50, 75. 

"THE FIRST VIOLIN." 

Misses Morgan, DeshOn, Scott. 
Mr. McAllister, Cuminings. 
Star Vaudeville. Nights, 15, 
25, 35, 50, 75. 



GlGLER 

Tailor 



6 West 29th Street 
NBW YORK 



ALVIENE'S 

Vaudeville School of Acting 

AMD 

Institute of Stage Dancing 




Grand Opera House Building 

23rd St. and Eighth Ave. 

New York City 

Largest sad most suooessful 
school of the kind la New York. 



New sets rehearsed snd whipped Into sbspe. 
Vaudeville acts, dsnees, sketches, etc., taught. 
1.000 successful pupils now on the stsge. Send 

for Illustrated booklet. 

TORONTO, ONT. 

SHEA'S (J. Shea, mgr.).— Week of 28 was the 
last of the sessbfl and a good bill was presented. 
Hani, the magician, did several clever tricks. 
Ward and Curran In "The Terrible Judge" was 
well received, though their sketch Is an old one. 
The Doberty Sisters are dainty dancers and singers. 
Others were James Richmond Gbmroy, the Great 
Proveanlcs, Estelle Wordette and company. Eck- 

hoff and Gordon and the Klnetograph. STAR (T. 

W. Stair, mgr.). — The Parisian Belles, Manager 
Stair's own show, did well 2N-2 with an extra at- 
traction, pictures of the Sun Francisco earthquake 
and Are. "The Sultan's Wives" and "The Girl 
from Manila" gave Matt Kennedy many chances 
and he availed himself of them. The Buttons, 
Bertha Ames. Marvelous Heumans, Brum* and 
Morris did well in the olio. Next week the War 
Theatre stock company will be seen. New 
features will be given weekly. Mr. Stair will 

have an amateur night every Friday. HAN- 

LON'S POINT (L. Solmon. mgr.; C. MacMahon. 
amusement mgr.).- Huston-Dallas company, Mld- 
dleton and his manikins, Elizabeth Miller, Barker 
and Barker and the Great Klnsness formed a fair 

bill. Fair business. SIJNNYSIDE SUMMER 

THEATRE (E. Brooker, mgr.).— Frank Smith, 
illustrated songs; the Lyons In songs and dances 
und moving pictures did well at this new resort 
week of 2K. HARTLEY. 

TRENTON, N. J. 

LAKESIDE THEATRE. Spring Lake Park, 
opened Monday evening, somewhat of an Improve* 
men! over last year, the management having ex- 
pended 15,000. Something new this year Is the 
electric theatre opposite the pavilion. The main 
attraction this week Is the blograph views of the 
San Francisco disaster and illustrated songs. Close 
to 500 persons braved the weather conditions to 
witness a program of high class vaudeville. Max- 
well and Dudley opened the bill and Scored 
strongly. The Caldownle Sisters, gowned hand- 
somely, wmi favor. Nellie RIee, singing comedi- 
enne, was eotnpelled to respond. Van Brothers 
proved their ability to play musical Instruments, 



V 



HAMMEISTEIN'S TH CAT ILL 
ICTORIA y A.UET1ES 

Next Week JSPSSSm JUNE 4 

Prices, 25c, 60c, 75c & $1 00. Mat. Every Day, S6c * 60c 

Inauguration of Ninth Annual Season. 

Every Evening at 8. 

HAMMERSTEIN'S PARADISE ROOF GARDEN 

And Victoria Theatre of Varieties. 

New Features Weekly. 

First Time In This Country, 

LA BELLE BAIGNEU8E 

LALLA SELBINI 

The Bathing Girl. 

CLTFFE BERZACS COMEDY NOVELTY CIRCUS, 

Introducing the Only UNRIDABLB DONKEY in 

the World and the REVOLVING Table. 

Third Roof Season of 
RICE AND PREVOST. 

Direct from the Hippodrome, 
CAPTAIN WOODWARD'S SEALS. 

ABBIE MITCHELL . 
And Her 25 Tennessee Students, 
Colored Singers, Dancers and Musicians. 

THE FOUR BARD BROTHERS, 

Most Marvellous Gymnasts on Earth. 

GREEN AND WERNER, 
"Babes In the Jungle." 

COLLINS AND HART, 
Parody Acrobats. 

THE KITABANZA TROUPE OF JAPS. 

CAMILLE TRIO, 
Comedy Bar Act. 

THE THREE CONBTANTINE BISTERS, 
Direct from the "Vanderbilt Cup" Company. 




GREATER N.Y. CIRCUIT 




scoring as big as when they were last seen here 
with the Al G. Fields' Minstrels. The work of 
"Johnny" Clark, purveyor of wit and humor, kept 
the audience in an uproar from the start. 

II B. II. 



TROY, 

PROCTOR'S (W. II. 
Week US: This Is the 
week of vaudeville at 
and Robert Dalley In 
titled "A Bit of Tomfoolery 
(tivid. Jane Courthopc and 



N. Y. 

Graham, res. mgr.). — 
thirty ninth and closing 
this house. Bert Leslie 
a laughable sketch en- 
were well re- 
company In "A 



Fisherman's Luck," thoroughly amusing and well 
presented. Oensro and Bailey in a one act play 
entitled "A Victim of circumstances," amusing. 
Taylor Holmes, nomologist, la al>ove the average 
and was appreciated. Bryant and Savllle in their 
comedy skit "Start Me" created a favorable Im- 
pression. Eleanor Henry, vocal soloist, was gen- 
erously applauded. Maize Brothers in a good 
comedy acrobatic set, good: Motion pictures are 
shown. Next week Proctor's Fifth Avenue 
Dramatic Company will open the summer season 
of stock plays. -ALTRO PARK (Max Rosen, 
mar.), formerly Dreamland, on th«* Albany Road, 
opi in d its gates to the public to day with large 
attendance. Thoiisinds of dollars have In-en spent 
o'i this park, which Is practically a new resort. 
Features of Interest will be band music and 

vaudeville.. KLIX'TRIC PARK. Klnderhi>ok 

Like (J. M. Wlllson, mgr.). Crowds flocked to 
the opening, All th«» regular attractions of the 
park were In Opera t Ion; In addition Cnrtland's 

Band gave concerts afternoon and evening. 

LAGOON ISLAND PARK (.1. A. Webber, mgr.) 
had Its formal Opening for the season today. 
Many of the old attractions are still retained, 
also many new ones have been added. This Is a 
popular resort and had a good attendance after- 
noon and evening. J. J. If, 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

LINCOLN PARK THEATRE (Sanford Wallln. 
mgr.), Jones and Sutton, singing team, fair: 
Chalk Saunders, food; Mr. and Mrs. MoGrevy, 
good; Burke's dogs, fair; Kelly and Kent, excel- 
lent; The Smith Troupe of Acrobats, well re- 
cc|\ed. WHITE CITY. The Four Le Pearls 
In a casting set wcie very good, as were the 
Wolf Brothers on the hounding billiard tables; 
"Chick," comedy bicyclist, was fair, and Vera 
Court Iclgh. singing comedienne, was good. 



14 



VARIETY 



TAPESTRY LEATHER 
SOUVENIR SPECIALTIES jw 

Pilgrim's 
rfa>grtss 



> 



> 



. 



TAPESTRY LEATHER PILLOW 
CUSHIONS 

front and back stitched, complete with fringe, 
$9.00 per doz. 

TAPESTRY LEATHER POST^CARDS 

$16.00 per thousand. 100 designs. Send for 
a sample order of 100 cards. $1.60, postpaid. 

ART TICKING PILLOW TOPS 

contain 15 catchy and beautiful colored de- 
signs. Burnt leather effect. $2.60 per dos. 

THE "BOOTIE" PURSE POST CARD 

In tan or white, a winning souvenir for any 
locality or place. Catchy designs, blank space 









for name. Burnt leather effect Big sellers. 
Order now. $9.00 per gross; 86c. per dos., 
postpaid. 

JULIETTE POST CARD PURSE 
"JUST OUT" 

a novel and attractive souvenir, with local or 
comic views, entirely new and original. Space 
also for Initial. Price $18.00 per gross. Send 
for a sample dos. $1.60, postpaid. . 

A COMPLETE ALPHABET 

1 Inch, fancy letters, brown Ink and pad, for 
stamping post cards or purses. $1.75 the set. 

Complete catalogue of specialties 
sent upon request 



THE SOUVENIR PILLOW TOP GO. 



320 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK 



yyyyyyyyyywyys^yyyywyywy> > s«a <yyyyyyyywyyyyyy ^ yyyyyyyyyy y y y yyw> 



N O T I C 

ARTIBTB AND MANAGERS! 



Hendersons Theatrical Agency 

Has remoTed from 67 6. Clark street to their new, com mod Ions offices In the 
OGDEN BLDG., 34 8. CLARK STREET. BOOM 810. CHICAGO. 

WANTED— Good vaudeville sots sad outside attractions for immediate time. 



AN AU, STAR CAST 

IS THE EDITORIAL STAFF OF THE 

NEW YORK INQUIRER 

_ IT INCLUDES 

JOHN W. KELLER 

WILLIAM C. NICHOLAS 

HAMILTON L. MARSHALL 

CHARLES ALFRED BYRNE 

"CHOLLY KNICKERBOCKER' 
R. I. NAVMOND 

CHARLES €. TREVATHAN 

LEANDER RICHARDSON 
snd others 

The Publication, ia§ued Sunday*, treat* of Society, Wall Street 
Politic*, Racing, Sport*, Automobiling, Theatre* and miscellaneous 
matter* and it 1* essentially 

" A Smart Paper for Smart Persons " 

Knickerbocker Theatre Annex, - New York 



PINBHUR8T PARK.— Reta and Inez Kaufman 
were good; Frank Roes, Hebrew comedian, well 
received; Helen Jewell, singing act, fair; Bonda, 
contortionist, wan excellent; Lasher and Lake 
were good in Irish comedy; The Wonderful Dog* 

and Poniee made a hit. NOTES.— Plnehurat 

Park opened with a grand electrical display May 
::<> Many new attractions have been added thin 
Hcason. Nellie Mason la making a decided hit at 
Poll's this week singing Illustrated songs. Al- 
bert Scott, formerly of vaudeville, now a stage 
director, wax In New York last week, where be 
attended the rehearsals of the operas "Alda" and 
"Carmen," which were produced at the Fourteenth 



Street Theatre last Monday. Mme. Clongh, the 
leading soprano of this company, has been under 
the personal Instruction of Mr. Seott for the past 
rear, HARLOW L. STEHLB. 

YORK, FA. 

HIGHLAND PARK. -Opened May 2d with 
Spring (iarden Hand as the attraction, with stand- 
ing room at a premium. Week of 28: The Park 
Amuseuient Company, to all appearances a hatch 
of amateur*. The only thing to commend is a 
dramatic recitation by Denton Vane, late of "The 
Choir Singer." JACK DIAMOND. 



LONDON -MUSIC HALL" 

15 he. Great English Vaudeville Taper (W***Jv) 

401 STRAND. W. C. 

American Representative— Miss Ids) M. Carle, Room 706, St. Tames Building, where • 



cepresen 
file of 



papers can be seen and advertisements 



» 



fce received 



NEW 




HOTEL 



(EUROPEAN PLAN.) 

EUSON'8 THEATRE, northeast corner Clark and Xlnsls strssts, CHICAGO, ILL. 

Everything new. Running water, steam heat, telephones In all rooms; elevator service. Light 



breakfast served in rooms free of charge. 



Make my hotel your home when in Chicago. 

A. J. FLYNN, Prop. 



^^ESAs 353 ; 



QT's 




-= ■■■■-=^-=s 



OUT TO-DAY 

A Real Vaudeville Newspaper 

ALL NEWS STANDS 



ROOMS 731-782 KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE ANNEX. 



'PHONE 8794— 88TH. 



1408 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY. 



] 




WE CARRY THE 
LARGEST AND MOST 
VARIED STOCK OF 
DICE IN THE WORLD. 

Try our new TRANS- 
PARENT, INVISIBLE 
SHAPES, use as many 
as yon wish, let Player 
select any 2. 

PRICE PER PAIR, 
91.60. 

BICYCLE PAPER. $9 per dos.. best on earth; 
Block Out Ink also, for line work, per hot., 
$1.50; CHICAGO SET SPINDLE, $20; Roulette 
Wheels complete, 1,000 Harris checks, $186; 
Check Cop, the Poker Players' best friend, $3; 
Harris Inlaid Checks, any design, per M, $22. 
Send for our new Cut-price catalogue. Free. 
JUST OCT. 

H. C. EVANS & CO. 

1 25 Clark St., Chicago. 



REHEARSALS 

/" Best Place In New York f 

(lOSSWEILEn 

CAFE AND ASSEMBLY ROOM 

350 PIRST AVENUE, NEW YORK 

Bet. 20th A 21at Sts. Telephone, 3897 Qramercy 

RENT, LEASE OR SALE 

BON TON 
Family Theatre 

Also store adjoining, 30 feet by 100 deep. 

Write J. O. JEMON. LYCEUM THEATRE, 
PHILADELPHIA, FA. 



ATTENTION 

MANAGERS OF THEATRES, SUMMER PARKS, 
RESORTS, STATE, COUNTY AMD STRUT 
FAIRS, RACE MEETS, ETC. 

EPH THOMPSON'S 

Hord of Aorobmtlm, 
Oomody mnd Mllltmry 

Elephants 

Four (4) in number, inoluding "MART." the Srst 
and only elephant taught to turn somersaulta. 
Positively the Greatest Act In all the World and 
with which no other elephant exhibition should be 
compared. Ask anyone who knows. 

ALSO THE GREATEST OF ALL AERIAL NAVI- 
GATORS. 

WILLIAM MATTERY 



AND HIS MONSTER 



AIR SHIP 

'' W. S. CLEVELAND " 

Every flight guaranteed. 



For time and terms address 

W. S. CLEVELAND, Mgr., 



680 E. 46th St. 
Chloago, III. 



VAUDEVILLE HE1DLINERS 
GOOD STANDARD ACTS 




AND 



If you have an add open week yon want to 111 at 

abort notice write to W. L. DOORSTAOER, 

Oarriok Theatre, Wilmington, Del. 

Csn close Saturday night and make any city east 

of Chicago to osen M— day sight. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

OP marl CLASS VAUDEVILLE THEATRES 

M. MEYIRFSLD, JR.. Pros. 

MARTIM BICE, General Manager. 
FRANK VINC1NT. B. T. Reprssentatlvs. 
All Applications for Time Moot be Addressed to 
. B. BEAT, Reoklai Usm 



ARTISTS DESIRING TIME 

Ple>ase> 'Writ* to 

GEORGE MANAGER 

HOMAN5 SOUTHERN 



St. James 
Building 

N. Y. 



Amusement 



VARIETY 



IS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



The 4 




4 



SISTERS AND BROTHERS 



THE DANCING STARS 

Have closed a very successful season with the great Orpheura Road Show. Are booked solid for 1906-7 under the management of Mr. Kohl, of Kohl and Castle. 



SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT! 

Rice and Cady 

Bobby North 

Edward F. Gallagher 

(OF GALLAGHER & BARRETT) 

Playing a 20 weeKs* engagement in Weber and Fields' produc- 
tions at Mason Opera House, Los Angeles, Cal. 



The Irish American Trio 

PRESENTING THEIR ONE ACT COMEDY 

"MY SON TOMMY" 

Away from all otben. Open for Vaudeville, Faros Comedy or Burlesque. 
Addreet JOE J. MACKIE, HUNT'S HOTEL, CHICAGO. 



CHERIDAH SIMPSON 

IN VAUDEVILLE 
toe W. tTtb St.. New York. 



BELL an) HENRY 

"THE SLEEPY MAN/* 
Will shortly arrive in America. 



HAVE YOUR CARD IN UARIETY 



THE 

GIRL 

IN 

TROUSERS 



TI1B AGT BDAUTirUU 



IRENE IEE 



AND HER 

CANDY KIDS 



NOW BOOKING FOR NEXT SEASON 



NAT 



SOL 




D 



IN 



A 




William Gould 



AND 



AT TROCADERO THEATRE, CHICAGO, ILL. 

WILL PRODUCE TWO NEW BURLESQUES FOR WEBER A RUSH NEXT SEASON 



IN STOCK BURLESQUE FOR SUMMER 

ADDRESS TROCADERO THEATRE, CHICAGO, ILL. 



Will produce two new burlesques for T. W. Dinkins next season, one of which they will feature. Thanks to managers for offers. Address care of 

T. W. Dinkins, 1402 Broadway. 



Valeska Suratt 

Address Eccentric Club, London, W. C, until Sep- 
tember 1st. 
Cable address, "Reichplunk," 



THE WORLD'S 



IVIardo Trio 



OOMINQ EAST. Opon from Smmtemhor lOth. 



For timo .nd torms sddross REICH, PLUNKETT A WESLEY, St. Jmmms Bidg., Room 1024 



Look at this Combined Machine 

STEREOPTIGON AND MOVING PICTURES IN ONE. 




Designed especially for the Show Business. All siies. It is absolutely the BEST and MOST POWERFUL 

maohine on the market. 



VARIETY 



KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 

CARDS OF ARTISTS 



UNDER THE HEADING OP 



"REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS" 



1 -2 Inoh single oolumn, 

1 Inoh " 

1 -2 Inoh double oolumn, • 

1 Inoh " 



AT POLLOWINQ RATES: 



S2.00 monthly, Not 
4 00 M ■ 

4.00 M M 

7.B0 M m 



SILKO SCENERY 



SEND FOR FULL PARTICULARS 

NEW YORK STAGE LIGHTING CO., 145 E*st 23d Street. New York 

When answering advertisement 8 kindly mention Variety. 



The perfect trunk kind. Raven money, worry, time and excess. We paint all other kinds, too. A 
postal will "put you wise." DANIELS' SCENIC STUDIO, 724 Chicago Opera House, Chicago, U. B. A. 



16 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



FMTTsBQURG UNANIMOUSLY ENDORI 



WILLIAM COURTLEIGH 



& CO. In 



cc 



UNDER .THE THIRD DEGREE" 



Pittsburg Post says: The protean play glren by 
William Coartlelgh and bis company In the 
Grand during tbe past week at tbe bead of tbe 
continuous vaudeville bill tbere. waa a genuine 
and artistic dellgbt. Mr. Conrtlelgh played tbe 
eight parts undertaken by blm In "Under tha 
Third Degree" with fine discrimination and ex- 
cellence. 

Plttsbnrg Times: 

In his ratber crudely constructed little play- 
let "Tbe Third Degree," Mr. Courtlelgh suc- 
cessfully portrays eight different and strikingly 
contrasted roles within tbe space of 30 minutes. 



By r. c. Mcculloch 



To give such an undertaking even tbe sem- 
blance of success requires very quick and facile 
acting art. 

Mr. Courtlelgh plays all the parts with sur- 
prising accuracy. His work reflects far more 
than mere change of clotbes and facile makeup. 

In voice, mental poise and character Indica- 
tion this young actor demonstrates a real genius 
for protean portrayal and reveals unexpected 
powers of discrimination and acting Intelligence. 

Pittsburg Dispatch: 

Nothing at any of tbe theatres tbe paat week 
has been worthy of deeper consideration than 
the work of Mr. William Courtlelgh In his one- 



act protean play, "Under the Third Degree," 
which be has been playing at the Grand. With 
a vehicle possessing no Intrinsic value from a 
dramatic point of view the actor has managed, 
by virtue of his own extraordinary gifts, 
to lift his act- out of the depths of mediocrity 
to an altitude of histrionic perfection rivaling 
the best examples of the modern legitimate 
drama. Nine characters are portrayed by Mr. 
Courtlelgh in this little playlet, and in each one 
the art of the actor serves to make effective the 
change of Identity. There Is consummate skill 
In this versatility, something far and beyond tbe 
commonplace "change artist" which we are wont 
to see In vaudeville, and at times Mr. Court- 



lelgh revealed the flame of true genius. In his 
closing scene, where as Jim Werner, the firebug, 
under tbe third degree, tbe police reveal to him 
the horrible truth that be la not only an incen- 
diary, but a murderer — the alayer of his own 
flesh and blood, tbe sickly little boy whom he 
loved so well — his work commanded tbe closest 
attention and called for tbe most unstinted praise. 
An Italian, a Jew, a German, an Irish police- 
man, a simple-minded boy, a tough political boas, 
a Chinaman and an American worklngman were 
parts which Mr. Courtlelgh portrayed In this 
American adaptation of Jean Mlllerande's story, 
which has formed the basis also for Henri De 
Vrles* play of "A Case of Arson." 



ARTHUR STUART BE 



AINERS 



AND 



SINGERS 
DANCERS and 
CONVERSATIONALISTS 

Direction Myers ft Keller, 31 W. 81st St.. New York City. 



KEELEY SISTERS 



MIKE BERNARD 

Pianist at Pastor's Theatre 

Can accept other engagements. Club work especially. Address care of Pastor's Theatre. 



THE BLACK ACT 



JACK WILSON & CO. 



ALBERT GREEN 

"AN UPHEAVAL 

II MINUTES Of ONE. 



-WITH- 



IN- 



IN 



ADA LANK 

DARKTOWN" 

ASK MTERS ft BBIH, 



18 MINUTES IIN 1 



GAVIN, PLATT & PEACHES 



>ntlng"A STOLEN KID" 

Wa oarry a specially designed gipsy oamp seen* drop, painted by Valentine, and play Mr satire aet la 1. 




HarryW.Spingold&Co.(4) 

OFFER A ONE-ACT MUSICAL FARCE COMEDY ENTITLED 

"A HANDSOME STRANGER" 

The laughing hit of every bill. Now booking for Summer and next season. Addreas all flrat-olaaa 
agents or Harry W. Spingold, oare Variety, Chicago office, 79 S. Clark street. 

Have Your Card in Variety 



Andy Lewis 

PAST SEASON LEADING FEATURE SAM DEVERE'S OWN COMPANY. 
P. B — YES, MAUDE ELLIOTT RETURNS TO THE FOLD. 



I 



EmiL 



Ernie ^ Honegger 

WORLD'S GREATEST M0N0PEDEB. 

In a rei ned comedy, dancing equilibrist and acrobatio aot. Open for burlesque and vaudeville. Address 
WESTERN MANAGERS' ASSOCIATION, Majestic Theatre Building. Chicago, 111. 




Wktn CfttiMrfaf Wimtmmm MftA* motion Varhtt. 



VARIETY 



17 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



THE GREATEST 
EXPONENTS OF 
ART I ST I O NOVELTIES 



THE EXPOSITION FOUR 



3 ALEXANDERS AND BRADY 

t sensational .vRPRisEs PROTEAN ARTISTS WITH AN ELABORATE DISPLAY 

$1,000 WORTH OF THE CELEBRATED J. W. YORK & SONS' (GRAND RAPIDS) INSTRUMENTS 



MUSICIANS EXTRAORDINARY 
VOCALISTS OF POWER 

DANCERS OF EXCELLENCE 



May 27 — Ramona Park, Grand Rap- 
id!, Mich. 
June 3 — Majestic Theatre, Chicago. 




NYE 



Assisted 
by his 



ROLLICKING GIRLS 



Madison Square Roof Garden for the summer. Time filled 
for next season, opening Sept. 8, Keith, Boston. 



BEAU IDEALS OF VAUDEVILLE: 



Melville Ellis 



ORIGINAL PIANOLOGUE. 



JOHN 



EMILY 



DELMORE & DARRELL 



BOOKED SOLID FOR THE SUMMER. 



NOW BOOKING FOR NEXT SEASON. 



Chas. 




Evans 



& CO. 



Address Princess Theatre 

Season of '06 and 9 07 Complete New York city 



HARRY 



IDA 



SALMON <a CHESTER 



'Hir Australian Entertainers in their London Outer act. 



Week June 4— Keith's, New York City. 






JUNE 4» HAMMERSTEIN'S ROOF 



WM. MORRIS, Agent 



Time all filled 





THE POPULAR ARTIST OF THE MORNING TELEGRAPH 



Now tour in g as a special attraction on the 8ullivan-Considine Circuit. 
PERMANENT ADDRESS, CARE THE MORNING TELEGRAPH. NEW YORK CITY. 

"THE ATHLETIC GIRL" 



BELLE GOR 



lit 




WEEK JUNE 4— WONDERLAND PARK, MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



THE BLACK HUSSARS 



PREMIER SOLOISTS 



MUSICAL REEDS 

BEST BIG ACT IN ONE- 15 MINUTES 

Featuring our original novelty, The Seven-Bell Trumpet. Special drop. Only legitimate instruments used. 



u 



N 



ELTIIK.E 



PaS/lTURBD 

PALACE, LONDON* 

May I4th to Juna 2Sth. 

PARIS-.-BERLIN 
To Follow. 

N. S. BENTHAM O H. HARRAS. 

Personal Manager 




CHARLES 



LAURA 



HAIGHT £ DEAN 

Presenting "A MISFIT MEETING" 

A FEW MORE BRICKS BOLD LAST WEEK. 



Harry Holman 

WEEK MAY 2ft— SCRANTON, PA. 
WEEK JUNE 4— PATERSON, N. J. 
WEEK JUNE 11— PASTOR'S, NEW YORK 

GEO. P. MURPHY, Jr. 

German Comedian 

Re-engaged next seaaon. 
FEATURED MANAGEMENT CAMPBELL A DREW. 



E 



I I 



IE LEONARD 



IN D I X I IB LAND 

ASSISTED BY McGLOIN & SMITH. 

Featured for the summer with a hig minstrel show for Jake Wells. 
There will he no more trouble under the direction of William Morris. 



PADDLING OUR OWN CANOE- 





Nay 20, Proctor** 23rd SI. 



* 



Circuit to Follow. 

When answering advertisement* kindly mention Variitt. 



THE TWO 
DIXIE BOYS 

Management of JACK LEVY 



18 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



THE REAL 

PARODY 

ACT 



THE KEITH-PROCTOR-POU COMBINATION WAS FORMED IN ORDER TO SECURE THIS 

VALUABLE ACT IN ONE 

CHAS. and FANNY VAN 



OUR BOSOM FRIENDS 



MYERS & KELLER 



SMITZ MOORE 

The Well-known German Dialect Comedian 
Has closed with EUROPEAN SENSATION CO , and is now preparing 

A NEW ACT FOR VAUDEVILLE 

SOMETHING ENTIRELY OUT OF THE ORDINARY 

WATCH THXB SPACE FOR EXTRAORDINARY ANNOUNCEMENTS. Something new that will .ur- 
prlaeyov. 

Tint's all Joat bow. 

"There to no more genuinely fanny player of German roles on tbe stage to-day than Snlts Moore, the 
chief fonimker In the Gayety's Mil thto week. Moore's methods are his own In great- defree and he Is 
Imitated more often than he Imitates."— Pittsburg Qssette. 

Addrmma 3110 OOTTAGE GROVE AVENUE, OHIO AGO 



THE GREAT ROSAIRE 

DIRECTION BOYLE AGENCY 

31 WEST 31st STREET - • NEW YORK CITY 



Mr. Fred Karno's comedy &>. 

18 A Night In an English Music Hall" 

Manager, AXF. REEVES. Agents, Win. MORRIS and H.B. MARINELLI 



Notice to Proprietors, Managers and Others Interested 

The sketch is the property of and was produced by Mr. Fred 
Karno in IVondon, and all rights are legally protected. Infringe- 
ments of same will be immediately dealt with. 



NOW PLAYING GREAT ORPHEUM CIRCUIT. 



NOTICE. 



THE BIRD ACT 

LAMONT'S 
TRAINED AUSTRALIA COCKATOOS 



NOW BOOKING PARK TIME. 



Address UNION HOTEL, 117 Randolph St., CHICAGO, ILL. 



FRED 



"THE MUSICAL LAUGH MAKERS" 

ECKOFF and GORDON 



ANNA 



TWENTY-rOUR MINUTES 



SOLID LAUGHS AND APPLAUSE 

REAL MUSIC REAL OOMEDY 



AWAY FROM ALL OTHERS 



PRESS WORK, DOES IT PAY? 

ASK THE STARS— SOME FOR 
WHOM I'VE WORKED. 



RrCgH 



Graos 

Yaaituddi- 

f ord, Valla Bergen, 

rnomaa Q. Seabrooks, Anaia Irian, 

Jsannstta Lowrie, Maballa Oilman, Irsna Beatley 

Kits Taj, Mrs. Ysaatans, Eatalla Wsntworth, Caeridaa Simpaoa', 

Amy Rioard, Edna Goodrich, Jeeaette Dunree, Eltiafe, Eddie Leoaard. 

Oarlaton Maey, Maada Hall, Louisa Allen Collier, etc 

31 West 31st Street, New York 



Dick McAlli&terl 



II 



THAT BAD BOY 



it 



Joe Morris 



\THr HEBREW WITH THE PIPES" 



JEANETTE DUPRE 

HOTEL NAVARRE. NEW YORK. 



IRENE LA TOUR 



AND HER 
CLEVER DOG 



ZAZA 



ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO 

921 GARDEN ST., HOBOKEN. V. J. 



BELL and HENRY 

"THE SLEEPY MAN," 

Will shortly arrive in America. 



in a "Night in an English Muslo Hall." 



GEO. J. MacfARLANE 

BARITONE, 

With VIOLA GILLETTE 



nr VAUDEVILLE. 



SHEPPARD CAMP 

"THE MAM FROM OEOR0IA" 



FOR SALE 

WIGGINS FARM 



May Ward 

New York 9 9 
Favorite Comedienne 



15 MINUTES IN ONE. 

THE SEYONS 



HARRY 



JULIA 



IN THDIR LAUGHING SUCCESS, 

"The Census Taker" 



L eona Thurber 



AND HER 



4 BLACKBIRDS 

Booked aolld Seaaon 1906-7. 
Direction M. 8. Bantham. 
Piefcanlnniee lingiag Perm—. 



Regards 

1U 

Vaudeville 





De 

Unbleached 

American 



STARRING IN "RUFUS RASTUS" 



MANAGEMENT HURTIG (El SEAMON 
When ontwerinff odvertitemmt* kindly mention Varjett. 



VARIETY 



19 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



"THE GERMAN MILLIONAIRES" 

ADAMS-EDWARDS" 

In a pot-pourri of GERMAN COMEDY and GRANDQOPERA (not burlesque, but real singing) 

also Featuring Mr. Adam's BONE SOLOS and FIVE STYLES OF WOODEN SHOE DANCING 




ONE OF THE BEST DRESSED COMEDY ACTS IN VAUDEVILLE 



Booked by Western Vaudeville Association, Majestic Theatre, Chicago. Ask Jake Slernad 
PERMANENT ADDRESS, OARE VARIETY OHIOAGO OFFICE, 79 S. OLARK STREET 



BESSIE VALDARE'S 

THOWE OF CyCLISTS 

8m art* at Dressed and Most Refined Bicycle Act Before the Public. 

IDA CABLE, ST. JAMES BUX*., AGENT. 



/V\F* 

GEO. E. 



KSTADER SAYS IT'S GOOD 

WALT 



Murphy, Whitman & Co. 

"OLD RRIEIND S" 

BT GEO. E. MTJRPHY. STAGED BY HOWABD TBTJE8DELL. 

Mr. Manager: No matter what your opinion Is now, you will eventually play this act. There's a reason. 

Have Your Card in VARIETY 



AL. SHEAN— WARREN, CHAS 



IN THCIR ORIGINAL TRAVESTIES 



QUO VADIS-CAPT. KIDD 



PER ADD., SI CHESTER STREET, MOUNT VERNON, N V 

Beaton 1907-8 ■tarring' under direction of Peroj Wl 



mil. SANDERSON & BOWMAN hum.. 



I 
G 



M 



PRESENT 
NED NYE'S COMEDCTTA 

TIA/O XHEAXRE TICKETS 



» 



I 
T 



Working and playing for Western Vaudeville Association. Tlaymarket, Chicago. May 14; Olympic, 
Chicago, May 21. (Two shows a day.) Time filling fast. Eastern managers and agents, it will he te 
your advantage to Inquire about this set. We sail for Europe In December. For time call np JAKE 
STENABD or EDWABD H ATM AN, Majestio Theatre Bldg., Chicago, and they will connect yoo with 
a good act. 




HARRY JOLSOIM 



cc 



THE GHETTO SPORT" 



The Clever 

Singing 

Comedian 



Special Ten Weeks' Engagement on the Pacific Coast. 



Doing Well, Thank You. 
Permanent Address, care VARIETY, Chicago Office* 79 S. Clark Street 



ORIGINAL ! ! 



LATEST EUROPEAN SENSATION 



ORIGINAL ! ! 1 



MLLE LUBA DE 




1 " Sports from 



the Far East" 



The Greatest Animal Act Ever Imported. Introduced Entirely by a Lady ! ! ! I 

One Royal Scotch Mountain Bull, Two Midget Java Ponies, "Cuba," the Original Coon Dancing Horse, Troupe of Handsome Performing Dogs and "Sammy," the Famous Little Irish Comedian Donkey. 

A Sight for a Lifetime. The Great Finale on 3 Revolving Tablet. First Visit to America. 

Managers snd sgents sre invited to see this act. Just finished with tremendous success, Western Empire Circuit. For time and terms spply WALTER J. PLTMMER, 1804 Broadway, New York. 

WEEK JUNE 4— FOREST PARK HIGHLANDS, ST. LOUIS, MO. 



THE THREE RUBES 

BOWERS, WALTERS & GROOKER 



EOCENTRIO COMBO Y ACT 



All Agents 



c A L L ! 

Reward will be paid to all managers and agentt for the oapture of the laugh-making 



HEBREW COMEDIAN 



HARRY HARVEY 

At Bid J. Euson's Theatre, Chi cago , for the summer; at Liberty for next aeason. Musical oomedy or 
Durlesque. Address oars WESTERN OFFICE OF VARIETY, 79 8. Clark street, Chicago. 

NOW BOOKING FOR NEXT SEASON 

THE 
GREAT 

"ThelMarfician Who Drawa the People" 

H AX ENTIBELY MEW FB0OB AM Or KAOI0 NOW IN FBEPAB ATION. 




CLIFF E BERZAC 

The Laughter Maker 



AOMMT, H. *. MA*IMELU 



EDDIE SIMMONS 



will 
•»M«r 



ahertly Ganorn f lailatf ,n « h « ,r latent 
%mt with DlHaTQ A Dallly efferlng.'Teny" 



SLSy'DUPREE 

mmrmmn Ommmdy by Frmnk Kmmnmdy 



ALLAN 




Premier Manipulator off the World 

Returned from Australian Triumphs. Unique, Refined, 
Artistic Novelty. Address, no3 Broadway, Room 9, 
New York City. 



When answering advertisemmU kindly mention Variety. 



20 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



■ 



M O WATTS 





IBASON IOO« RINOLING DHOS.-8««80N 1007 EURO 



THE SINGING SENSATION ! 

MaudeRockwell 

PRIMA DONNA BOPHANO. MEW YORK SHORTLY, MANAGEMENT CHRIS 0. BROWN, 67 B. 

CLARK ST., CHICAGO. 

TIM McMAHON'S GIRLS 



■ 


- 


a 




| > T.I 


1 ^ T •, 



BURLESQUE STOCK 

SUMMER 1 906 

COLUMBIA STOCK, BOSTON. LAFAYETTE STOCK, BUFFALO. 

LYCEUM STOCK, WASHINGTON. BIJOU STOCK, PHILADELPHIA. 

T. W. DINKINS, 1402 Broadway, NEW YORK 



HARRY BOOKER jiikfIiiilei 



PRESENTING THE 



SI 



Walking Delegate 



S9 



A masterpiece of art, chiaeled from Nature, that appeals to the millionaire aa well as the fallery god, 
now meeting with a aucceaa unequaled in the annala of vaudeville. 

Willie Weston 

THE POCKET EDITION OF THE PEOPLE HE IMITATES. 
Exclusive A sent. AL. MAYER, St. James Bldg. BOOKED SOLID. 



Maxwell 



Jtt Xibertj/ 
for Tfext Season 



Character 

Comedian 

Versatility 
Personified 



Reynolds 



HARRY KATIES PRESENTS 





AND HIS 



School 
Girls 



INCLUDING 



OLLY MOELLIER and ALICE TELLER 



NOW BOOKING 



Walter 




& Co. 



"THE ENCHANTED WOOD 

Booking for next teaion s 

THE FAMOUS QIANT ROOSTER MOT 

Open for immediate time 
ress cere Variety, Chicago office, 79 9. Clerk Street 



99 



WORLD'S GREATEST BAG PUNCHER 

SEEBACK 



OPEN CHALLENGE TO THE WORLD. 



WEEK MAT 88— HOAO LAKE, W00N80CKET, R. I. 



HAVE YOUR CARD IN VARIETY 



JOSEPH K. WATSON 

Or HEELER AND WATSON 

Past season principal comedian "Bon Ton Burleaquers," has signed ALONE with MAURY KRAUS" 
"TWENTIETH CENTURY GIRLS" for next season. 

P. 8.— Mr. Harry Keeler, my late partner, will be associated with another Watson next season, 
assuming the name of Keeler and Wataon. I WISH to state that I HAVE WORKED HARD FOR OVER 
TWO YEAR8 to ESTABLISH THE REPUTATION of KEELER AND WATSON in the burlesque field 
and the future team by that name WILL NOT be the original Keeler and Watson, as I AM WORKING 
ALONE. 

address JOSEPH K. WATSON 

2117 N. 31st Street Philadelphia. Pa. 



TON 

LOTTA 

AND 



(LlffORD 




e 



3 HYLANDS 



PRESENTING A COMEDY SINGING, DANCING AND MUSICAL ACT. 



Introducing Master Ilyland, the only child Baton manipulator In the world. Managers wishing a good 
feature act for next season. Per. address, 88 Osborne St., Danbury, Conn. 



Frank 



ORTH / FERN 



Harry S. 



/\X LIBERTY 
P O R THE 

SUMMER 



<< 



SIGN THAT BOOK 



■i 



ORIGINAL POSTAL TELEGRAPH BOY 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Varixtt. 



VARIETY 



21 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



LICV 



AND 



LUCIER 



in their Comedy Sketch "THE FOOL'S ERRAND" 

Just closed a successful season on the Orpheum. Hopkins' and Kohl & Cattle circuits. BOOKED SOLID FOR NEXT SEASON by J. J. 
Murdoch, J. Sternad and Ed. Hey man of the Western Yaadevllle Association. Majestic Theatre Building. Chicago. 



Address care VARIETY. Chicago Office, 79 8. Clark St. 



OUR ROUTE FOR NEXT SEASON. 
Sept. 3— Keith's, Cleveland, O. 

•• 10— O. O. H., Pittsburg. Pa. 

" 17— Chase's, Washington, D. C. 

M 24— Mnryland. Baltimore, Md. 
Oct. 1— Keiths, Philadelphia. Pa. 

** 8 — Keith's, Providence, R. I. 

" 15— Keith's, Boston, Mass. 

" If— Moore's. Portland, Me. 

" M -Keith's, New York City. 
N,»v. ft— «. O. H.. Syracuse, N. Y. 

" 12— Temple. Detroit, Mich. 

•• 19— Moore's. Rochester, N. Y. 

" 20 -Shea's. Buffalo. N. Y. 
Dec. :\ -Sliea's, Toronto, Can. 

" 1o -Travel. 
1 " 17— Majestic. Chicago. 

" 24 — flay market. Chicago. 

" 81— Columbia, St. Louis. 
Jan. 7 — Olympic, Chicago. 

" 14 — O. O. H., Indianapolis. 

" 21— Columbia, Cincinnati. 

" 28— Hopkins', Louisville. 
Felt. :: — Hopkins', Memphis, Tenn. 

" 10— Majestic. Little Rock, Ark. 
Other dates to follow. 



The Celebrated Comic Opera Star 

MISS VIRGINIA EARL 



AND HER 



JOHNNIES 



WHEELER EARL 

The Butler 
FRANK GARFIELD 
JOS. W. HERBERT, Jr. 



ALBERT L. PELLATON 
ED. T. MORA 
HARRY L. TIG HE 
Accompanist 



Staged by ED. ROGERS. 





M AC A RT 

AND CO. 



ii 



IN WILL M. CRB9SY S BEST EFFORT 

The Man From Macy's 



19 



NOTICE 



».. E . INNESS & RYAN ■-«.» 

Have postponed European and Smith African time to July. 1007. owing to time arranged In this country. 
NOW PLAYING KEITH CIRCUIT. BOOKED SOLID. AGENT JO PAIGE SMITH. 



Opening Week of June 18th, PROCTOR'S THEATRE, ALBANY 

Management of LOUIS WESLEY 
REIOH, PLUNKET7 A WESLEY. - - St. James Building 

GMARL-CS ROBINSON 

America's Famous Character Comedian 

Re-engaged for next season with "Tbs Colonial Bslles" Co., as the 
HIGHEST PRICED COMEDIAN IN BURLESQUE. 



MANAGEJnENT 



CAM 



A DRBU/ 



WILFRED CLARKE 

Assisted by MISS THEO CAREW & CO. 

Presenting His Sketches 

NO MORE TROUBLE tuid WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT 

ADDRESS, LAMBS' CLUB 



AT LIBERTY NEXT SEASON. 



PHILBROOKSiREYNOLDS 

PRESENTING 

•• MISS STENO, STENOGRAPHER" 

A GERMAN COMEDY SKETCH. 
In preparation a oomedy act in one. Address WM. MORRIS. 



Hal Godfrey & Co. 



PRESENTING NEXT SEASON 
111 



Fred Watson 



IN PREPARATION 

AND 
THE 




in a big novelty singing and dancing act. Now booking next season. 



THE LIAR" By Edmund Day AND A VERY BAD BOY" By Irthur Lamb 

Two of the few standard sketches in Vaudeville. 

Address all communications to REICH, PLUNKETT & WESLEY, exclusive agents. 
"THE SOCIABLE GUY*' 

BARNEY FIRST 

THE HEBREW WITH EDUCATED FEET. 

Introducing good singing, talking and Hebrew buck dancing. Hsve some weeks open for Parks. 
Week May 27, Lagoon Park, Maysville, Ky. Permanent address "Variety," New York. 



BY OUR MERIT LET YE JUDGE US 

Another Tribute to Vaudeville 

Wm, INMAN. MARK HART 



P 




CO 



I 



The Quaint Dramatic 



Weeh June 18 tH, Pastor's Theatre 



RECOGNITION Spwl " Sc T, ry , and Eleclric 



For Time, Address All Agents 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



22 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




BEATRICE McKENZIE 

Supported by WALTER SHANNON and CO. 

In Lew H. Newoomb's delightful musical playlet, "A MONTANA BEAUT," in vaudeville. Have a 
few weeks open. Address oar© Variety, Chicago office, 79 S. Clark St. 

McGloin-Smith 

Artistic Delineators off Refined Sinking and Wooden Shoe Dancing 



THE DANCING WONDERS 



JACK 



LILLIAN 



BROWN I WRIGHT 



GREATEST NOVELTY SINGING AND DANCING ACT IN VAUDEVILLE. 



THE ORIGINAL 



Three Madcaps 

ININA AMY PANSY 



BOOKED SOLID 



PANSY 

Address AL. flAYER, St. James Building 





ros. 




The Meet Marvellous Qym.astlc Act la the World Accomplish!.* Seemingly Impossible Peats 

ORBIN BROS.' CIRCUS, MEXICO, UNTIL JUNE. 



Si Brooks 






"ON THE MAIN STREET" 



14 Minute* In One 



Permnnent Address, 201 E. 1 1 3th Street 



The Successful 
German Comedians 



A FLATLET IN ONE. 



COLLINS and BROWN 

in an ••AFFAIR OF HONOR" copyrighted 

PERMANENT ADDRESS, 148 K08CIU8KO ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. AN ENTIRE NEW OFFERING IN THE DUTCH FIELD. 





GERMAN DIALECT COMEDIAN. 



CLARK 

CLOSED SEASON WITH MINER'S AMERICANS. 



AT LIBERTY for BURLESQUE or FARCE COMEDY 

I'lttshurg 1'ress: "The principal character In the play was taken by E. A. Clark. His art in* was 
superb. In fact, he was the beat part of the show." ADDRESS 246 W. 36TH ST., N. Y. CITY. 

THE MUSICAL BELLBOY AND MILITARY MAID. 

fred CRAY and GRAHAM nellie 

ECCENTRIC MUSICAL COMEDIANS. 

MITCHELL and MARRON 

ORIGINAL TWO-MAN MINSTRELS. 



Home at last and taking a rest 

From a thirty weeks' trip In the Middle West, 

The story Is truly and quickly told — 

We have the act and are getting the gold. 

Two weeks Idle and then work starts 

For J. K. Burke and his circuit of parks. 



Have some open time In September 
(Agents and managers kindly remember), 
For good acts next season 
A demand there will be, 
So write at once to 



MAD ELL and CORBLEY 



AT HOME, 116 HOWARD ST., BUFFALO, N. Y. 



CAMPBELL & JOHNSON 

COMEDY ACROBATIC CYCLISTS 

Just closed successful season with Orpheum Road Show. Prootor's and Keith's Circuits to follow. 

Ira Kessner 



NOR 



EN ROUTE REILLY A WOODS' BIG SHOW. 

Duluth Tribune: Oue of the best Illustrated song 
acts this season. 

Kansas City Journal: He has an excellent voice 
and renders his songs In an excellent manner. 




SENSATIONAL ^ COMEDY 



TO LET by our only agents MYERS & KELLER, 



31 WEST 3 1 ST STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 



REGARDS TO KATE KLAXTON 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



23 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 






Address 



Morris 



EMMA FRANCIS 



and 
her- 



Arabian Whirlwinds 



IN VAUDEVILLE 

DIRECTION OF M. S. BENTHAM 

RICE & PREVOST 



IN 



BUMPTY BUMPS 

Arthur J. Miss Grace 

McWATERS ..d TYSON 

In a Spectacular Musical Comedy 
"VAUDEVILLE" 

WEEK JUNE 4, KEITH. CLEVELAND. 
WEEK JUNE 11. TEMPLE. DETROIT. 

MAJESTIC MUSICAL FOUR 

HIGH CLASS COMEDY MUSICAL ACT 

AT LIBERTY FOR NEXT SEASON 
Tilt mm FEATURE 1CT HEW tmtTllt 

ST.ONGE BROTHERS 

Variety's Greatest Comedy Cycle Act 

Concluding with a series of poses, aooorapanied by 

a monologue by FRED ST. ONOE. 

Agent, WILLIAM MORRIS. 




WEEK NAY 2 1, PASTOR'S 

Signed with Bob Manchester for next season. 

JOE EDMONDS 

" Tl " mVrJ'n"" Vaudeville 

LOUISE DRESSER 

Characteristic Songs 




F. Daly Burgess 

GOMBDIAN 

And tile Dog, - PINNEGAN 

In Vaudeville 

THE REAL GERMAN COMEDIANS 

ields-Wolley 

"A TRIP IN AN AIRSHIP." 

Week June 4, Electric Park, Baltimore. 

ED.F.REYNARD 



Season 

Season 

Season 
Season 
Season 
Season 



Ventriloquist 

1901-3— Great Lafayette Show. 

, Qn9 » I Primrose and Dookstader's 

iw»-s— | Mingtreli ^^ Empire Show. 

1903-4— Orpheum Show. 

1904-6 — Touring England. 
1905-6 — Touring Amerioa. 
1906-7 — Orpheum Show. 

Exolusire Agent. WILLIAM MORRIS. 



FRANK 



FLORIA 



TWO 
SYLVESTOS 

In their latest creation, "Rags and Oil." Pre- 
miers of lightning art. In their great transfor- 
mation scene*, "Venice by Moonlight." Open for 
next season. Some open summer dates. An act 
without a parallel. 2852 Lawrence avenue, 
Toledo, O. 



BILLIE RITCHIE 



4 4 



The Drunk" 



A Night in an English Music Hall 



10 MINUTES IN ONE. 

HELSTON & 0LLA-H00D 

SINGING, DANCING, COMEDY 



INVITE OFFERS 
NEXT SEASON 



IN STOCK 
RIVERSIDE IWRK. 
ROISE CITY, IDAHO. 



1906 



1907 



CHARLEY HARRIS 

THE HEBREW GLAZIER. 

THE INSPECTOR. 

THE GIBSON GIRL. 

80 MINUTES LAUGH— 1, S, 1. 

Let. of Harris A Walters. 

JACK INORWORTH 

I Present* THE COLLEGE BOY 



"Back to the Cactus" 

SAM RICE 

121 W. 95TH ST., NEW YORK CITY. 

V. (>. WOODWARD 

UcLtnbourine Juggler 

OPEN TIME ADDRESS MORRIS 



CHAS. B. 



LILLY B. 



Colby -May 

The Ventriloquist end 

The Dancin* Dell 

in Europe for One Year. 

Playing Return Dates Everywhere 

Per. Add. 20 Wellington St.. Strand W. O., 
London, England. 



Chas 



(TWO) 



Alice 



Shrodes 



RENTED 



JOE 



HAYMAN 



and 



MILDRED 



FRANKLIN 



In "A SUIT FOR DIVORGE" 

Now playing in England. 

WILLIAMS 
and DIXEY 

Have in preparation for next season their new 
Ethiopian effusion, 

"A MAKESHIFT BENEFACTOR." 

A. H. WOODS 

Can nae sister acta and sketch teams for 
next aeaaon. 

tiO.W.HUStfY&O). 

VENTRILOQUIAL COMEDY. 

BURROWS -TRAVIS (0. 

WEEK MAY 28— PITTSFIELD. MASS. 



THE FAMOUS 

Colby Family 

IN VAUDEVILLE 
Booked solid for next season by Win. Morris. 

Gartelle Bros. 

SKATORIALISM 



AGENTS TAKE NOTICE. 

ZARELLS 




EUROPEAN EQUILIBRISTS— SOMETHING NEW 



Ross - Vack 

OERMAIM COMEDIANS 

HAVE IN PREPARATION THEIR NEW ACT 

FOR NEXT SEASON. 

May 28 l<> June 2:\ in nto<k. Boise t ' 1 1 y . Idaho, 

care of Riverside Park. 

June L'4 to July 7. Ofden. Utah. 

Permanent address, 11 West 114th at., New York. 



The Demi-Tasse 




Comedian. 



"THE NARROW FELLER .» 

HILL AND 

SYLVIANY 

Address REICH, PLUNKETT A WESLEY. 

St. James Building 

WEEK MAY 21 AND 23. LUNA PARK, PITTS- 
BURG. PA. 

MUSICAL SIMPSOIIS 

XL, and that means something. 

Have Youi-iCard in VARIETY 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 









24 



VARIETY 



























:< 









NOTICE 



Managers 



Agents 



TOM 

Un 

Tom Almond 
European 
Novolty 
Dancer 



The 



Almonds 



EDITH 

EdHh Rloharda 
the Dainty 
Mustoal 
Artist 



In Their 



NOVEL EUROPEAN ACT 



Week of June 4 

EXTRA ATTRACTION 

Tony Pastor's Theatre 



LASKY, ROLFE & CO. 

ANNOUNCE THE FIRST APPEARANCE IN NEW YORK OF 

The 



Lasky-Rolfe Quintette 

THE HOST ARTISTIC MUSICAL ACT IN VAUDEVILLE, AT 

PROCTOR'S 23rd St. Theatre 



= 



WEEK OF JUNE 4th 

NOTK. The atleetioni rendered by the Quintette have been arranged and rehearsed by 

VICTOR HERBERT 



Office 



• m^w.^F'E & CO. 

I Hudson Theatre, IN 




\nj York City 



WILL ROSSITER'S 

PROFESSIONAL 



SONG HEADQUARTERS 



Grand Opera House Bldg. Chicago 



Now 
In 

SING "SUNNY SONGS" AND BE HAPPY 

"Farewell, my Annabelle"— A nice girl could do wonders with me" 

"The man with the Jingle"— "IF THE MAN IN THE MOON WERE A COON" 

"Come under the palm-room tree "—" They'll all be glad to see you" 

"I'll be back In a minute, but I got to go now"— "Hooley" 

"In after years, when I am old"— "Though we part Til not forget you" 

"Don't forget your dear old dad"— "I am content to wait" 

Most COMPLETE line of SKETCHES-ACTS-PLAYS- JOKES-STAGE MATERIAL 

ALWAYS GLAD TO SEE YOU 

isahlKSS, WHEN YOU WRITE "Z~i?i£l 



An Ideal Route List 



\ 7AR1ETY intends shortly to carry a route list, com- 
plete in every particular. Artists may have their 
names listed with route two Weeks in advance. 






The Feature of It 



will be that WHEN NOT PLAYING HAVE 
YOUR MAIL ADDRESS INSERTED 
INSTEAD. 

Through this means you will ALWAYS HAVE 
YOUR NAME ON THE LIST and may be 

reached at any time. 

It will be the only accurate variety 

directory. 



Chorus Ladies Wanted 



FOB 



W. B. Watson's Orientals 



AND THE 



Washington Society Girls 

TOURING OVEE THE EMPIRE CIRCUIT EXCLUSIVELY. 



Addresi 



SALARY INO OBJECT 

NOTHING TO FURNISH ONLY SHOES AND TIGHTS. 

I W. B. IA/ATSOIN, manager 

KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING, BOOM 720 TO 726, NEW YOBK CITY. 



BRONX LOTS (24th w.ro NEW YORK CITY 

$550 UPWARDS ON EASY TERMS 

Near the Bronx and Pelham Parkway 
For further particulars apply to 

GEORGE RIO, RI o w b'&s.. 31 West 42d Street, New York City 

Reprinting HUDSON P. ROSE COMPANY. 



Have you 
considered 
what la the 



MR. PARK MANAGER 

beat drawing attraction for an off nlqhi ? We will put you next. It la a brilliant 

Fireworks Display 

s..d ,. 7r ,...r. COLONIAL FIREWORKS 00. M A3SSr gfrfgr 

Correspondents Wanted 

Wherever there i§ • Summer Park, Vaudeville or Burlesque Theatre 



TWENTWEIGHT PAGES. 









• 



FIVE CENTS, 



-* 




VOL. II., NO. 13. 



JUNE 9, 1906. 



PRICE FIVE CENTS. 




lntered at $econd clvst matter December 22, 1006, at the pott office at N eic York, If, 7., under the Act of Congrest of March 8, 1879. 



- 



VARIETY 



THE VAUDEVILLE SITUATION. 

The vaudeville situation has revolved 
since the last issue of Variety until at 
the present moment the William Morris 
office occupies the centre of the stage. 

The reports that the Western Vaudeville 
Association would take some decisive ac- 
tion during the week proved groundless, 
Messrs. Meyerf eld and Beck having left 
New York for Chicago on Thursday morn- 
ing. They will return again in about three 
weeks. There seems to be a foundation 
for the report that the Western people 
have agreed with Keith on foreign book- 
ings up to next fall, but no papers have 
been signed, nor is it probable that any 
will be if a loophole of any kind for es- 
cape is left. There is no inclination on 
its part to bind their managers down un- 
der a written agreement with Keith, pre- 
ferring to remain independent as long as 
opposition does not compel such action to 
be taken. 

The Keith office is almost demoralized. 
Nothing has been gained by the acquisi- 
tion of Proctor and Poli. Neither the 
Sullivan -Oonsidine circuit or Western peo- 
ple have been added to the Keith list, and 
a strong rumor says that the contemplated 
"merger" between Keith and Klaw & Er- 
langer is all but off. In the extremity that 
Keith is driven to, however, at this time, 
he may sacrifice considerable to effect the 
K. & B. alliance. 

There is no question but that William 
Morris will have a strong circuit at an 
early date. All the indications point to 
that. Houses and sites are being selected 
which together with those he now books 
for will give him a list of magnitude. 

If the Western Vaudeville Association 
books through the Morris office it will be 
to prevent the Western time of the Sulli- 
van-Oonsidine circuit falling under the in- 
fluence of that agent. On the other hand, 
if the Sullivan -Ooneidine circuit places its 
houses with Morris the effect will be far- 
reaching. In a way it may be disastrous 
to the Keith office, for some of the Keith 
managers who have been booking through 
his office for a long time are said to be 
willing to change their allegiance immedi- 
ately upon Morris developing sufficient 
strength to justify the action. 

Provided neither of the independent cir- 
cuits forme an alliance with either side, 
Morris will have plenty of houses to book 
for. 

The Western Vaudeville Association 
may wait until fall before announcing 
what it intends doing; the same applies 
to the Sullivan-Considine circuit. In the 
meantime the managers of the Morris 
office will continue to secure theatres until 
the Morris office will be unable to accept 
either through having the principal cities 
covered. 

The Keith office made a fatal error when 
it offered prohibitive terms to the remain- 
ing managers on the Morris list. Another 
mistake was in not booking all the avail- 
able acts immediately upon Proctor and 
Poli joining the office. It left Morris time 
to recover, which he has done. 

The artist views the situation with com- 
placency. The coming season looks good 
to him. 



THE BURLESQUE SITUATION. 

Nothing of importance leaked out for 
publication during the week in the present 
strife between the two burlesque Wheels. 
Any day, though, may bring forth news 
of interest. 

Members of the Empire Circuit (West- 
ern Wheel) have intimated that there 
would be an announcement made within 
a short time of new acquisitions, one hav- 
ing gone so far as to say that soon a 
''bomb' 1 would be exploded that would ex- 
ceed the concussion caused by the previous 
one, referring to the addition of Sullivan 
& Kraus to the Empire Circuit. 

The Eastern Wheel men say that, while 
they may perhaps be obliged to remain 
passive as regards the New York City 
proposition for next season or until entry 
in the Sullivan & Kraus houses here has 
been denied their shows, there is under 
way a plan whereby an immediate legal 
determination may be had of their stand- 
ing. 

The meeting for routing of the Eastern 
Wheel shows will be held on June 27. 
Probably shortly afterward an application 
will be made in the United States Court 
for a restraining order against Sullivan & 
Kraus on the ground that they have or 
intend to break the contract made with 
the Eastern WTieel through joining the 
Western. 

This may bring the matter to a focus, 
and although no confirmation will be given 
of the report that the Eastern Wheel is 
preparing itself for an adverse decision by 
accumulating theatres in New York, little 
doubt exists that this is being done. 

Hurtig & Seamon's Music Hall on 125th 
street has been mentioned; also the Mur- 
ray Hill Theatre. 

A Western Wheel man, speaking pri- 
vately, said that although Sullivan & 
Kraus anticipated no legal action, they 
were ready for whatever might present it- 
self, as no breach of contract had been 
made through the removal of the houses 
to the other circuit. 

Rumors are still in circulation that the 
Empire Circuit is endeavoring to induce 
Hyde & Behman to leave their present as- 
sociates in the Eastern Wheel. 



CONSIDINE EXPLAINS HIS 
POSITION. 

With the vaudeville interest largely 
centred in the proposed action of the 
Sullivan-Considine-International Theatre 
Company, the two forming the whole 
commonly known as "the Sullivan-Con- 
sidine circuit," John W. Considlne, who 
figures largely in the formation, was 
asked on Thursday for a statement regard- 
ing the attitude of the interests he repre- 
sents. 

Mr. Considine did not seek to evade 
the issue, replying, "We are waiting to 
see what the big people of vaudeville are 
going to do. John J. Ryan, who is 
largely interested in the International 
Theatre Company, with which the Sulli- 
van-Considine circuit is allied, is now out 
of town. We are in no hurry to take any 
action, but will do so when we decide 
what is to our best interest. During the 
summer vaudeville is dull, and so far as 
I can see there is no great hurry. I have 
spoken) to both the Keith people and 
Morris, but it is not settled in any way." 

Asked what effect the booking of the 
John Oort circuit in the Northwest by the 
Western Vaudeville Association would 
have upon a decision reached, Considine 
answered: "The houses of Mr. Cort must 
'be considered opposition wherever they 
are in our towns, and it does not seem 
plausible, does it, that we wish to con- 
nect ourselves with our opposition? It 
is unlikely that any action will be taken 
by us right away, say within a week, 
at least. I had an appointment with 
Keith and ETlanger at the New York 
Roof last night, but I was an hour late 
and missed the party." 



THOMPSON & DUNDY WITH MORRIS. 

An agreement almost on the point of 
closing will bring the Hippodrome and 
Thompson & Dundy, its managers, into 
William Morris' office. This occurring, all 
foreign acts will be booked through that 
office. 

Since the success of "The Yankee Cir- 
cus" in Chicago, the Hippodrome firm has 
decided positively to build in the Windy 
City, which will give it two immense thea- 
tres in the United States, capable of offer- 
ing from fifteen to twenty-five weeks under 
their management alone. There is an inde- 
pendent venture of this kind now under 
way in Cleveland, adding more time to the 
Hippodrome route. 

When the agreement has been effected it 
is understood that Clifford C. Fischer will 
give up his office in the Holland Building, 
going abroad as a representative for 
Thompson & Dundy and Morris. 



MARTIN BECK WONT TALK. 

When Martin Beck, general manager of 
the Orpheum Circuit, was asked this week 
whether the Western Vaudeville Associa- 
tion would sign an agreement with Keith 
or book through the office of William Mor- 
ris, Mr. Beck replied: "I don't want to 
talk about it at all. You will hear some- 
thing soon that will be satisfactory to 
everybody." 

Morris Meyerfeld, Jr., the president of 
the circuit, upon having the same ques- 
tion put to him, and being reminded that 
he had always said that the Orpheum Cir- 
cuit would remain neutral as long as possi- 
ble, answered : "What I have always said 
still holds good. Further than that I don't 
care to say anything for publication.' 



>» 



A GENERAL PRESS AGENT. 

The new office of "General Press Agent" 
has been created in the Keith Booking 
Agency. John T. Fynes, brother of J. 
Austin Fynes, has been selected to fill the 
position. 



ELLEN TERRY SURE. 

In spite of all rumors to the contrary, 
Ellen Terry will come to America in Sep- 
tember for a vaudeville engagement in the 
Percy Williams houses. 



KEITH BARRED. 

There will be a dearth of Keith agents 
around Hammeratein's Victoria Theatre 
hereafter. D. F. Hennessy received in- 
formation direct from Oscar Hammerstein 
last Sunday that neither he, Mr. Keith 
nor any employee would longer be wel- 
comed. 

Mr. Hammerstein was not over par- 
ticular in the manner of expressing his 
reason for the action, and was led to it 
through the frequent visitations by the 
agents attached to the Keith office. 

Not believing they were altogether im- 
pelled through a frantic desire to see the 
show at the Victoria each evening, th«» 
supposition presented itself that the cause 
may have been to gain information. 

With the present tension between the 
vaudeville factions at an ebb, Mr. Ham- 
merstein clinched the matter by his ul- 
timatum. 



LUESCHER'S PLANS. 

Mark Luescber is the new lessee of the 
Chestnut Street Theatre in Philadelphia, 
and his financial backer is Levey, who con- 
ducts a chain of cleaning and dyeing estab- 
lishments throughout the city. The deal 
was consummated through Felix Isman, the 
real estate operator of Philadelphia, who 
in turn is said to be the financial sponsor 
for Mr. Levey. The lease for the Phila- 
delphia playhouse was signed immediately 
after Luescher '« retirement from the Proc- 
tor forces on Monday, and he is already 
laying plans for a chain of vaudeville 
houses. Luescher's brother conducts the 
National in Rochester and, with Hurtig & 
Seamon, the Bast able in Syracuse. Hur- 
tig & Seamon's participation in the Basta- 
ble lease ceases with the current year. The 
Luescher interests are in active negotia- 
tion for houses in Buffalo and Pittsburg. 
The former manager for Mr. Proctor has 
just spent a couple of days in those towns 
discussing the details of the scheme with 
local capitalists. 

Whatever arrangements are made will be 
subject, however, to the booking arrange- 
ments of William Morris with any circuit 
having a vaudeville theatre established in 
either of the cities. 



HAMMERSTEIN AND PHILADELPHIA. 

Oscar Hammerstein spent two days in 
Philadelphia this week and upon his re- 
turn said that there would be nothing to 
divulge in relation to his vaudeville plans 
for that city within a week. 

Mr. Hammerstein may have seen Thom- 
as Wana maker, who is building a theatre 
next to the Lyric on Broad street, and 
that may be the permanent home of Ham- 
merstein's Victoria, by which name any 
house acquired will be known. 

As a temporary home in Philadelphia, 
however, the Chestnut Street Theatre, now 
under lease to Mark Luescher, will prob- 
ably be run by Messrs. Luescher and Ham- 
merstein jointly until the other house is 
completed. 



CHASE MUST BUILD. 

Washington, June 8. 
There is much speculation here as to 
where the new Chase's vaudeville theatre 
will be located. The old site has been 
taken over by the Government as an addi- 
tional site for a park to extend to the 
Post-office. The present Chase's will be 
demolished. No announcement of a new 
location for the playhouse has beea made. 



EASTERN WHEEL IN RICHMOND. 

The Eastern Wheel of burlesque will 
have a new theatre in Richmond, Va., open 
for business by January 1 next. 

A site has been secured in the Virginia 
town and building operations will shortly 
commence. 

The building of the new house at Mem- 
phis, Tenn., is now under way. 



GOLDEN'S BENEFIT AT NEW YORK. 

The New York Theatre will be the scene 
of Geo. Fuller Golden's benefit on June 17. 
Applications from volunteers to appear 
have been arriving in floods. 

Tickets are being disposed of in quanti- 
ties. The White Rats of America placed 
an order for fifty at $5 each. Several in- 
dividuals have paid large sums for single 
seats, and the affair promises the largest 
financial and entertaining returns of the 
season. 



VARIETY 



%KIETY 

▲ Yarietr F«p«r fer Taristy Psople. 

PibUshsd «t«I7 totmrday by 
TH* TA1I9TT FUW8HINO CO. 

Knickerbocker Thsatfs BslMln«. 
1409 Broadway. N«w York at* 

Telephone 1817-Wtb St. 



are now at Riverside Park, Boise City, 
Idaho, in stock. 



The Variety Artistes' Federation in Eng- 
land now holds seventy meetings through- 
out the provinces weekly and has over 
1,400 members. 



J. an; 



Dick Temple will play a few weeks in 
the continuous prior to the opening of his 
regular season in August with the Marie 
Cahill company. 



Entered as teoond-claf matter December 
22, 1900, at the poet office at New York, N. 7.. 
under the act of Oongreee of March 8, 1970. 



CHICAGO OFFICE, 

79 8. Clark St 

FRANK WIE8BERO, Representative. 



John L. Sullivan recently appeared for 
a week at one of the cheaper Western 
variety houses and the receipts for the 
seven days aggregated $6,000. 



LONDON OFFICE. 

48 Cranbourne Street, 

MISS JENIE JACOBS, Representative. 



15 cents an agate line. $8.10 an Inch. One 
page. 8100; one-half pafe, 880; one quarter page, 
82S. 

Charge for portraits furnished on application. 

Special rate by the month for professlonsl card 
under heading " Representative Artists." 



S0B80BIPTI0N RA 



John P. Rogers, the former basso of Tal- 
bot and Rogers, has signed for the Mel- 
ville B. Raymond production of "Little 
Jack Horner" for next season. 



l/ r , 



Biz and three sooths in proportion. 
Single copies tve cents. J 

Variety will be mailed to a permanent a d d r ess 
er as par route, as desired. 

Make all rsmlttaBOSS payable to Variety Pah- 

llthlng Co. 

^— ^— i^^— — ^ ^ smssasnsisme^^^^ ■ ■ ■■ - ■ ■■ - 

Ospyrlght 1808 by Variety Publishing Co. 



Vsi II. 



No. 1 3. 



VARIETY announces "f airness" as the 
policy governing it. 

It is conducted on original lines for a 
theatrical newspaper. Whatever there ia 
to be printed of interest to the profes- 
sional world will be printed without re- 
gard to whose name ia mentioned or the 
advertising columns, 

"All the news all the time" and "ab- 
solutely fair" are the watchwords. 

The reviews are written in a strictly 
impartial manner and for the benefit of 
the artists. 

VARIETY ia an artiet'a paper, for the 
artists and to which any artist may come 
with a just grievance. 

VARIETY will not burden ita columns 
with "wash" notices; it will not be in- 
iuenced by advertising; it will be honest 
from the first page to the last. 



Martin Beck and "Eddie" Shayne had a 
verbal tilt last week during which each 
|»aid his respects to the other. 



Jack Wilson and company have been 
hooked for forty-eight weeks over the 
Keith circuit, including Western time. 

The boy in the Duffin-Redcay troupe of 
acrobats broke his ankle while playing' in 
the Orrin Bros.' circus in Mexico re- 
cently. 



Mary Manson, a youthful singer, is now 
with McWaters and Tyson, after having 
attempted vaudeville as a single enter- 
tainer. 



Walter McPherson, one of the original 
Spook Minstrels, has left the company and 
will undertake a tour as a single singer 
if vaudeville. 



Helston and Hood, having closed with 
the "California Girls" burlesque company, 



Grapewin and Chance received an offer 
from Keith for forty-two weeks at less 
than one-half the weekly salary that they 
are accustomed to collect in vaudeville. 



Lily Seville, the English singing comedi- 
enne, sails to-day for home. Miss Seville 
returns in September to fulfil twenty 
weeks now booked over the Keith circuit. 



Ed Girard. who was resident manager 
for Percy Williams at the Gotham, East 
New York, is managing "Pharaoh's Daugh- 
ter," a new attraction in Dreamland, Coney 
Island. 



George M. Cohan owns a one-third in- 
terest in the new Smith-Sousa opera "The 
Free Lance," which failed to play to 
capacity at the New Amsterdam Theatre 
recently. 



Machnow, the Russian giant, sailed on 
the Pretoria last Monday. It was the 
only boat to be found that could accommo- 
date him. He will appear on Haramer- 
sJoin's Roof over here. 



Al Onken, one of the booking managers 
for the Sullivan-Considine circuit, will 
make his headquarters for the summer at 
the Family Theatre in East 125th street, 
the circuit's city house. 



Julius Steger, the operatic vocalist, will 
open at Proctor's Newark Theatre on Mon- 
day next in a sketch called "The Fourth 
Commandment," based upon a story simi- 
lar in theme to "The Music Master." 



Rosaire and Doretto cancelled their De- 
troit date this week. The Piccolo Midgets 
leplaced them. The midgets are not feel- 
ing well though, and will rest during the 
next two weeks, having cancelled that 
time. 



The St. Onge Brothers have been booked 
for a tour of Europe covering a period 
of two years. They will oj>en at the Win- 
tergarten, Berlin, in August for a six 
weeks stay. Booking secured by Alex 
Steiner. 



The former team of Watson and Keeler 
has been rent asunder. Wat -on will go 
alone next season with ••The Twentieth 
Century Girls."' Keeler, it i- reported, 
will seek another partner and continue on 
under the old name. 



Bonita, formerly the leading woman of 
"Wine, Woman and Song," the burlesque 
company belonging to M. M. Thiese, will 
be starred next season in a musical comedy 
managed by Mr. Thiese and Will Drew. 
Combination theatres will be played. 



Susie Fisher, last with Frank Daniels 
in "Sergeant Brue," has gone and entered 
vaudeville and nobody ever heard a word 
about it until she appeared at Keith's, 
Boston, this week. She is singing the same 
songs she used in the musical* comedy. 



William A. Brady and Joseph Hart bad 
a heated discussion behind the scenes at 
the New York Roof on Tuesday evening 
as to the advisability of playing through 
the scheduled performance or closing down 
after the first act of "Seeing New York." 



The little youngster in blackface used as 
the comedian by Lalla Selbini in her ex- 
posure act on Hammerstein's Roof is a 
Boer. Miss Selbini and her husband 
(Willie Pantzer of the Pantzer Trio) 
picked the "kid" up while playing in South 
Africa. 



James Leonard and wife, who have been 
principal members of Fred (rwin's shows, 
have been coaxed away from the organ- 
ization, which is affiliated with the East- 
ern Wheel, to sign for several years wiiii 
one of T. W. Dyskins' burlesque produc- 
tions. •• 



Jim Plunkett, in association with his 
brother Joseph, who is connected with the 
executive staff of Liebler & Co.. opened a 
roller skating rink in the Harlem Casino 
on Monday and says that despite the hot 
weather the place is doing an excellent 
business. 



Alex. Steiner and Mrs. J. Steiner, his 
sister-in-law and wife of the director of 
the Wintergarten in Berlin, will sail for 
Europe in July, Mr. Steiner going to Lon- 
don first and Mrs. Steiner directly home. 
The homely philosophy of Steiner will 
be missed during his absence. 



Happy Fanny Fields, who is back to 
her native heath on a vacation, returns to 
London in August. She won't jeopardize 
her excellent standing in England by risk- 
ing a failure in her own country. Fanny's 
pronunciation now flavors strongly of the 
"cawnt" and "fawncy" variety. 



There is a story told of John D. Gilbert, 
the comedian, that at one time while Mr. 
Gilbert was behind his company at San 
Jose, Cal., he received a wire from the 
manager from San Francisco informing 
him to join at Portland. Gilbert replied : 
"0. K. Which— Maine or Oregon?" 



Lottie Blackford (Mrs. W. V. Jen- 
nings), of Blackford and Harlowe, sails 
to-day for London, Eng., where she will 
visit her parents, whom she has not seen 
in years. She will return for the rehear- 
sals of Dinkins' "Utopians," with which 
company she has signed for next season. 



A diamond fob was presented to Jas. H. 
Cm-tin, manager of the Tendon Theatie, 
by New York Lodge No. 1, T. M. A., as 
a recognition of his efforts in dlsposinc 
of the most tickets for the recent affair 



given at the Grand Central Palace. Mr. 
Curtin established the same record last 
year. 



Ed S. Keller was compelled to abandon 
his scheme for playing Cissie Loftus next 
season at the head of her own vaudeville 
organization. Selma Braatz had also been 
signed for the company. But the present 
condition of affairs made it impossible to 
lay out a route. Hence the signing with 
Joe Weber. 



Couture and Gillette, booked for the 
Alhambra this week, were replaced on 
Tuesday evening by Laveen and Cross, 
both members of the team having been 
temporarily incapacitated. David Oouture 
was seized with a hemorrhage of the nose 
and Charles Gillette got into some kind of 
an altercation with another artist on the 
bill. 



What burlesque shows, if any, are to 
lake the place of these lost to the Columbia 
Amusement Company (Eastern Wheel of 
Burlesque) by the transfer to the Empire 
Circuit of the Sullivan & Kraus interests 
will not be decided until the day of the 
annual drawing, set for June 28. The 
drawings will be made at the Fifth Ave- 
nue Hotel. 

The Keith Booking Agency may yet be 
named "The United Booking Agency." Mr. 
Keith had that name in mind some time 
since when a proposition was made to 
William Morris to enter the Keith office. 
Although that will probably never come 
about, the Keith executives think that the 
name of "Keith" left off the title would 
in a measure remove the red flag from the 
artists' sight. 



Harry Cooper of the Empire City Quar 
let. while attempting facetiousneas last 
week when playing Hammerstein's, suf- 
fered somewhat through a retort of Oscar 
Ifammerstein. A few managerial lights 
stood on the corner near the Victoria 
Theatre when Cooper drove by with a cab 
he had purloined for a moment. Driving 
close to the curb Cooi>er attracted 'heir 
attention. Looking up Oscar said, "Ah, 
that is the business you should have stuck 
to." 



A male member of the Majestic Trio 
(colored) used his "head" to excellent ad- 
\ ant age last week at the Fifty-eighth 
street theatre. A white woman of a 
rather "loud" box party during one per- 
formance threw the colored man a bouquet 
of violets which she removed from her 
corsage. Without deigning a look at 
■'ithrr the flowers or the donor, he kicked 
the bouquet off the stage into the wings, 
proceeding with his part without noticing 
the incident further. 



•The Limit," the somersaulting auto- 
mobile exhibition which was the feature 
of the Barnura-Bailey show at. Madison 
Square Garden, has been discontinued 
since the road tour of the circus com- 
menced. Octavia La Tour, the French 
girl who rode in the machine, has re- 
turned to her native land. The show people 
explain that the reason for the closing of 
(he act was the inability to secure a firm 
foundation for the landing board in the 
day stands. The girl received $1,500 
weekly for th«' a<'». ii i* said 



VARIETY 



Why the Vaudeville Artists 

of America Should Organize 



■»,» 



BY SIME. 



About the only danger to the complete 
organization of the vaudeville artists at 
the present time is that the prospect ^or 
tranquillity in so far as he is concerned 
for next season will allay apprehension 
and laxity will follow. 

This should be avoided under all circum- 
Htances. "In times of peace prepare for 
war." The general who uttered that quo- 
tation had a foresight that every vaudeville 
artist should deem it his duty to live up to. 

Whether the managerial end of vaude- 
ville be a close corporation or an open 
field, it devolves upon the artist to prepare 
himself by organization. 

If the competition between the managers 
keep the evils at a minimum, that will 
afford so much more time for thorough 
work until the day when the association 
of artists may be handy. 

There are now two societies formed and 
open to desirable applicants. The White 
Rats, the older organization, have no lim- 
ited lines, while the Comedy Club will 
accept only members eligible for election 
through coming under that heading. 

From the understanding of the purposes 
of the Comedy Club it has not been formed 
under the belief that it may eventually 
control vaudeville or become the largest 
aggregation of artists. 

Its membership is defined, and under 
that limitation it can never include the 
artists as a whole. 

The White Rats, on the other hand, has 
none other than the customary restrictions 
regarding its members, and may elect any 
vaudeville artist it votes favorably upon 
to membership. 

Between the two organizations every rep- 
utable vaudeville artist in America should 
be enrolled. When the time is considered 
opportune a joint committee selected from 
both bodies should meet for the purpose of 
devising the best ways and means to ac- 
complish this. 

Nothing will be gained by the White 
Rats and the Comedy Club working at 
cross purposes. A perfectly plain procla- 
mation should be issued by each setting 
forth unqualifiedly that membership in 
both may be held and that one does not 
conflict with the other. 

Secrecy should be maintained. The 
monthly membership list issued by the 
White Rats ought to be discontinued. It 
gives information possibly not otherwise 
obtainable, placing the managers in pos- 
session of the strength of the order, with 
the knowledge where to look for the weak 
spots, if any. 



The Comedy Club should be circumspect 
in this regard also. Where no informa- 
tion is given out the facts will be exag- 
gerated and the society receive a fictitious 
strength, thereby adding to its influence. 

The strain for the past three weeks must 
have awakened all artists to a realizing 
sense of their danger if the vaudeville 
world is ever placed under one head. That 
is or should be ample reason in itself why 
an organization is required immediately. 

But the artists should look away into 
the future. What may have passed over 
for the present can occur again. Admit- 
ting that vaudeville will never wholly be 
cornered, it may be in a position of ap- 
proaching practical control for a period 
anyway. If that is ever reached an alli- 
ance will undoubtedly be effected with for- 
eign managers. When that has been 
gained all the avenues for work to artists 
will be closed excepting under the direc- 
tion of the combine and such other small 
time as is always available. 

To offset this and be prepared the or- 
ganization here should be hurried, and 
when toward completion, or nearly so, a 
union should be formeJfcrith the foreign 
artists' societies, giving an international 
grand body and acquiring the same power 
throughout the world wherever vaudeville 
is played that would be received at home 
through its own members. 

This will work to the advantage of ar- 
tists everywhere. It can be done, not in a 
minute, "no more than a combination of the 
managers could be thus quickly formed, 
but time, patience, thought and work will 
bring it about. 

The society of all the artists in America 

S«f| 

must be on a substantial basis. The elec- 
tion of a new president for the White 
Rats takes place one week from to-morrow. 
After that it is possible that the name will 
be changed to something more distinctive. 

All associations of vaudeville artists 
ought to affiliate, giving more power to the 
stronger. Too many bodies may ruin the 
result. 

It has been suggested that when an or- 
ganization of an imposing membership in 
numbers has been effected that some sort 
of a working agreement could be entered 
into with the Theatrical Mechanics' Asso- 
ciation. That society is a powerful body, 
holding full sway behind the footlights 
and fears nothing from any manager, hav- 
ing the balance of power. 

The suggestion may be worthy of serious 
consideration at the proper time. Now it 
must be organize, and organize quickly. 



O 



MISS TILLEY'S LAST APPEARANCE. 

'Ihe last opportunity of seeing Vesta 
Tilley in this country will occur at the 
final concert given at the Colonial this 
week. The redoubtable vaudeville im- 
pressario Percy Williams, who has been ex- 
ploiting the clever English artiste for the 
past six weeks in his theatres, says "it 
is positively Miss Tilley's last appcararce 
in America." A silver loving cup is to be 
presented by the management. Dave Rob- 
inson, manager of the Alhamhra. r^reiveil 
an elaborate cane from Mist Tille, as a 
memento. 



HAMMERSTEIN'S OFFER TO KEITH. 

On last Monday night Oscar Hammer- 
stein wrote and mailed a letter to B. P. 
Keith offering to purchase Keith's theatre 
ir. Philadelphia, saying that he understood 
it was on the market, and to purchase it 
would save him (Hammerstein) the an- 
noyance of building there. 

The letter contained oth^r remaiks. the 
sist being that Mr. Hammerstein believed 
li^ had more chance of success in Philadel- 
phia with a Hammerstein show than Mr. 
Keith had in Txmgacre square with a 
Keith bill. 



VAUDEVILLE NEXT SEASON. 

The events of the past two weeks have 
so shaped themselves that a reasonably fair 
forecast may be made of vaudeville for 
the coming season. 

The combination of the Keith-Poli-Proc- 
tor interests threatened a one-sided out- 
look for the artist, but from the box-office 
point of view it did not become even a 
matter of speculation whether the man- 
agers remaining in William Morris' office, 
who had been offering large salaries for 
features, would be obliged to corral more 
houses for an outlet for the acts when se- 
cured. 

The announcement by Messrs. Williams 
and Hammerstein of their intention to give 
vaudeville out of town on the same scale 
as presented in their theatres here virtu- 
ally settles the questions of opposition and 
competition. 

These are the two necessities to the 
nrtist in order that time and salary may 
be abundant. With Mr. Williams in Bos- 
ton and Mr. Hammerstein in Philadelphia, 
even though these managers do not extend 
their operations to other cities, it means 
that the Morris office will be past its 
former strength before September 1. The 
action of these prominent managers will 
invest confidence, bringing large and small 
houses into the Morris office for the benefit 
to be derived from its bookings as exem- 
plified by the Williams and Hammerstein 
weekly bills. 

The more important result to be ob- 
tained, however, will be that of forcing the 
Keith houses in cities where the Morris 
opposition exists to give a higher grade of 
vaudeville than has heretofore been offered. 
Keith will be in a similar position to that 
in which the two managers found them- 
selves after the desertion of Proctor. 

Keith will discover that his name will 
not attract patrons, while a real vaudeville 
bill is being presented elsewhere in the 
same city, and to secure the acts requisite 
to meet the opposing forces he will be 
obliged to pay the prices and provide the 
time. To do the latter other houses on 
the Keith circuit will have to be included 
in the routings, and once the outside coun- 
try is educated up to good vaudeville it 
will not allow the brand to deteriorate, 
with the consequence that when Keith 
plays the best acts he will be compelled to 
maintain the standard to the advantage of 
the artist and vaudeville in general. 

If the present complication existing be- 
tween the moves of the Western Vaude- 
ville Association and the Sullivan-Consi- 
dine circuit works out to place these two 
forces in array against each other, the 
situation will become so much more fa- 
vorable. 

Provided no untoward event occurs be- 
tween now and the opening of next season, 
the artist will be the gainer in every way 
and vaudeville receive an impetus in a 
single season that would not have been 
received in five years otherwise. 



WILMER NOT WORRIED. 

Sidney Wilmer, of Wiluier & Vincent, 
sailed this week for a long trip, including 
a visit to South America. 



Will H. Ward, German comedian, last 
with Tom Miner's Bohemians, has signed 
with Ed Miner's American Burlesques for 
the coming tour. 



BURLESQUE NEXT SEASON. 

On one point a burlesque admirer may 
rest content. During the season of '06-'O7 
more and better burlesque shows will b° 
seen than any heretofore produced. 

The rivalry between the two burlesque 
"wheels" will bring that about. 

Managers in both divisions are making 
extensive preparations for the coming sea- 
son. Higher salaries have been contracted 
for, a general advance of between forty 
and fifty per cent having been paid, ex- 
cepting for chorus girls. 

More attention is being given to the 
burlesques. The books for the opening 
and closing numbers will be carefully writ- 
ten and edited. 

"Clean" is the cry of the managers. 
Both sides have acquired houses which to 
be properly supported must have whole- 
some shows. Burlesque is advancing, and 
while the strife between the two factions 
has made it expensive for each in the 
gathering together of its show*, the gait 
once struck must be maintained. Bur- 
lesque will never again reach the level of 
the long ago. 

Regardless of the ultimate ending of the 
burlesque "war," the present competition 
between the Eastern and Western Bur- 
lesque Wheels will have a lasting effect 
upon the quality of the offerings in future. 

The orchestra and not the gallery here- 
after will be played to. That this is ad 
visable has been proved, and shows cater 
ing to the gentle folk will prevail. 

Whatever may happen between now and 
fall between the opposing wheels in the 
burlesque struggle will have no appreciable 
effect upon next season's productions. 
Contracts have been entered into, most 
artists engaged, and the plans in so far 
as the shows are conoerned will not be 
affected. 

The outlook for burlesque in point of 
patronage in the future is excellent. The 
quality will bring business, for the aver- 
age burlesque show the coming season will 
compare with a vaudeville organization, 
having the additional flavor of a musical 
comedy. 

The dearth of musical shows the season 
now ending will add a considerable patron 
Bge hereafter. The public will turn to bur 
lesque as a regular supply. 

One season of solid, clean burlesque will 
do more for the business than anything 
else possible. It is a common belief that 
next season will be the one. 



ENGLISH ARTISTS ARRIVE. 

Without preliminary tooting of horns 
or even an engagement for a single day 
booked, Sam Soda and Ida Gladstone ar- 
rived last week from England. 

They are now looking for time. Mr. 
Soda is a comedian who improvises, while 
Miss Gladstone is a character change sing 
er. Both are said to have some reputation 
at home. 



Ki<hard Pitrot is scheduled to sail for 
Burope the first week in July. 



THE TYSON FAMILY RESTING. 

After a full season at the Bon Ton The 
atre in Philadelphia, owned by her sister, 
Mrs. John G. Jermon, Maryland I. Tyson 
will visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Prank 
Tie man, at Baltimore. 

Mrs. Jermon (nee Lillian Tyson) has re- 
covered from a severe attack of typhoid 
pneumonia and will rest at her country 
home in Arlington, Md., while Virginia 
Tyson, after the close of the "Golden 
(Yook" burlesque company, will also spend 
tin* summer. 






VARIETY 



LEO CARRILLO'S CARTOON OF THE WEEK. 




REMICK & CO. DENY. 

The firm of J. H. Remick & Co. requests 
Variety to deny emphatically the rumor 
which has been persistently circulated that 
Mose Gumble, manager of its professional 
department in New York, would be trans- 
ferred to the Chicago office. No such thin;» 
has been contemplated, they declare, and 
the report has absolutely no foundation 
in fact. 



WILKES BARRE WILL BE INVADED. 

There is a well-thought-out-plan under 
way whereby some of the managers now 
booking through the Morris office will 
build a vaudeville theatre in Wilkes-Barre, 
Pa. 

S. Z. Poli has a theatre in prospect 
there, but the surrounding territory to 
draw from is ao thickly populated that 
the Morris contingent has decided that the 
town will easily stand opposition. 



GRAND STREET THEATRE CLOSES. 

The Adler theatre on Grand street, New 
York, lately leased by Maurice Boom and 
others for a vaudeville show house, will 
wind up its season under the present les- 
sees to-morrow night. 

Associated with Mr. Boom in the ven- 
ture was one Max Adler Heine, who 
seemed to have financed the transaction, 
signing all checks. In one or two in- 
stances Mr. Heine neglected to make 
proper provision for the payment of the 
checks after delivery and this indicated 
a stringency in the "bank -roll." 



WHO GETS THE ARCADE? 

The practically nev theatre at Sixty-fifth 
•street and Brondway in the Arcade Build- 
ing has been overlooked in the rush Ibr 
out-of-town sites. 

It has a seating capacity of about 1,400 
and is close enough to the Colonial, a few 
blocks down the street, to be formidable 
opposition. The customary rumor that 
Keith is after it is going the rounds. An- 
other report said that Lasky & Rolfe might 
lease it. It is on the market. 



FEARFULLY QUIET ABOUT NEW 
YORK. 

After the preliminary announcement that 
the Keith-Proctor firm might take hold of 
the New York Theatre for a vaudeville 
retort ^next season a state of quietude has 
prevailed, 

The only result of the intended "scare" 
has been to frighten Oscar Hammerstein 
into Philadelphia in opposition to Keith. 

The impression around town this week 
has beeu that the Keith people decided it 
would be well to stop talking unless Ham- 
merstein should make up his mind to open 
houses all along the Keith circuit. 



THE CANADIAN CIRCUIT UNDECIDED. 

Contrary to report, the Keith Agency 
has not enrolled the new Canadian circuit, 
with two and possibly four vaudeville the- 
atres to be in readiness over the border 
for opening between now and fall. 

There are some internal dissensions in 
the management. When straightened out 
booking arrangements will be made. 

Some of the principals in the enterprise 
were, in the city the early part of the week, 
calling upon William Morris. Before leav- 
ing town, it is understood, Mr. Morris was 
informed by the Canucks that he would 
again be consulted before any positive 
agreement was made with any one. 



WANTS TO BUILD IN ST. LOUIS. 

St. Louis, June 8. 

Any one may have a vaudeville theat 
in St. Louis for the asking. T. Alb< 
Swasey, connected with the Missouri- Li: 
coin Trust Company, has long been des\ 
Ottl of building a playhouse. The com! 
tions have not favored the plan. 

Owing to the present vaudeville dihV 
ences in the East, Mr. Swasey is in hoj 
that he will be approached by some vain 
ville manager of repute who will accept 1 
house after it is finished. 

Mr. Swasey has said that only a fir 1 
class theatre will be erected by him. 



The Wolpert Trio leave for the other 
>'u\c in a couple of weeks. Their feature 
trick was the result of ten months' con- 
stant practice. 



VERIFICATION BY DESTRUCTION. 

When the booking arrangments for Hen- 
derson's Coney Island Music Hall were 
transferred from William Morris' office to 
the Keith Booking Agency, advertisements 
appeared for all artists holding contracts 
for Henderson's to produce them at the 
Keith office in the St. James Building for 
verification. 

Some artists, suspecting no trickery, 
marched down to the St. James Building 
and produced their original contracts as 
requested. Instead of being verified the 
contracts were retained by the Keith office 
and the artists were informed that the en 
gagement was off. 



MAX FREEMAN ALL READY. 

Max Freeman, the well-known ecc< • 
trie actor and stage director, will mak« i 
tour of the vaudevilles under the ehapen 
age of Jack Levy. He will ap|>ear in • 
sketch entitled "Swell Moe" and have i 
assistance of three others. Freeman's b . 
gest hit in this country was his imp 
souation of the waiter in the origi: I 
adaptation of Sardou's "Divonjons." 



MUNDORFF IN THE ST. JAMES 

Commencing with this week Ua. 
Mundorff of the Proctor stuff was trn 
ferred to the Keith office in the St. Jai 
Building as a Proctor representative. 



Billy Gaston has a new musical •ketch Qua Pixley and May Voke.; opened 

in preparation. It will require fiv«* people. Proctor's Albany Theatre Monday las*. 



VARIETY 






rr- 



J- 












\j 



Lalla Selbini. 
"The Bathing Girl." 
Hammerstein's Roof Garden. 

Formerly a member of the Selbini Fam- 
ily of bicycle riders, Lalla Selbini, one of 
the daughters, appears on Hammers-.ein's 
Hoof Garden this week for the first time in 
this country in a single act. It isn't so 
much what the young woman does as whar 
.she wears thai will attract attention. Weil 
made up, looking almost handsome on the 
stage, Miss Selbini after a few simple jug- 
gling tricks discard* her costume, appear- 
ing as nature intended her with only a 
skin-tight piece of cloth separating her 
natural color from the gaze of the audi- 
ence. Without the aid of corsets she pre- 
sents a figure that excites admiration, and 
while riding a wheel assumes positions that 
leave little to the imagination. The 
tricks performed are familiar and not dif- 
ficult. A boy in blackface acts as com- 
edy assistant, but there are no laughs, only 
gasps. Miss Selbini is frankly indecent in 
her exhibition and will probably be talked 
about, becoming a drawing card thereby. 
As a "living picture" she is immense. 



■^ 



y 



Sttiie. 



Lasky Rolfe Quintet 
Musical Novelty. 
Twenty-third Street. 

Four 'cellos and a bass violin grouped 
before a big sounding 'board furnish de- 
lightful music in this newest effort of the 
Lasky & Rolfe amusement factory. Of the 
players two are girls and the other three 
me*h. There is a certain degree of incon- 
gruity in the conventional dress of the 
players against the bright background of 
the sounding board, which is made to look 
like a gigantic sea shell. The numbers 
are exceedingly well chosen, being for the 
most part medleys of popular songs of the 
day. The act is one of the best musical 
offerings Lasky & Rolfe have turned out. 

Rush. 



M 



Ruth Allen and Company. 

Dramatic Sketch. 
Twenty-third Street. 

Ruth Allen, who was one of the prin- 
cipals in "The Strength of the Weak," has 
a rather odd playlet called "The Girl," 
which would make a great deal better 
thousand-word storiette than it does a dra- 
matic sketch. Its chief flaw is that noth- 
ing happens except talk and a large pro- 
portion of that is soliloquy. Miss Allen 
has the role of an ultra athletic girl, a 
breezy, up-to-date sort of a person who 
smokes and is given to picturesque speech. 
No frills, dainty gowns or the like femi- 
nine fripperies for hers. Muriel Fairfax 
(Miss Hart) is the sweet young thing her 
name would indicate. Muriel has been 
invited to dine with a man whom it de- 
velops subsequently is the very person 
with whom the athletic girl is violently in 
love. This much is brought out little by 
little with some good comedy points. The 
theme is one of considerable topical inter- 
est, but the whole playlet is pitched in 
rather too quiet a vein for vaudeville pur- 
iwses. Rush. 




"The Sexton's Dream." 
Novelty Act. 
Hurtig & Seamon's. 

A pure singing sketch with decidedly 
novel and picturesque scenic setting and 
incidentals. Frank Mayne is the principal. 
The stage is set to show a view of the 



NEW AGTS Or THE WEEK j 



house tops of New York at night with a 
glimpse of Brooklyn Bridge in the distance. 
In the centre rises the steeple of Trinity 
Church. The subdued strains of an organ 
are faintly heard. 

The act has a pretty poetic 
flavor which could be height- 
ened by explaining that the night is Christ- 
mas Eve and by working in a dainty 
Christmas story out of the old man's past. 
The sketch received its first presentation 
Monday and Mr. Mayne was obviously 
nervous. His work was consequently rough 
in places, but he has an excellent voice, 
and when he has found himself in his pres- 
ent environment the act should be a valu- 
able one for the best class of houses. 

Rush. 




J 



"Lo-Qna." 

Illusion. 

Hurtig & Seamon's. 

Billed as coming from London, the fea- 
ture appears to have made something of a 
hit on its first American presentation. The 
figure is about man size, dressed in Chi- 
nese costume and connected by wires with 
a small cabinet. Henry Clive, who works 
the act, manages the talking part of the 
figure apparently by the use of electric bat- 
teries. At the opening it is placed npon a 
sheet of plate glass about the centre of 
the stage. The feature of the act is some 
well-managed work of the Fay sort. A 
number is written by a man in the audi- 
ence, words are written by another and a 
card is selected by a third. Upon Mr. 
Olive's return to the stage carrying the 
written words the figure reads them. The 
final trick is much the best. Two poker 
hands are dealt to as many members of 
the audience. The cards are then handed 
to an usher and Mr. Clive returns to the 
stage. The figure is made to tell how many 
cards each man will draw. The usher deals 
them and the figure calls off the hands. 
While this performance probably involves 
nothing more occult than card manipula- 
tion, the work is done with great skill and 
undoubtedly makes a strong impression. 
The whole act runs along to the accom- 
paniment of some rather bright showman's 
patter and is a decidedly entertaining one. 

Rush. 



.M 



Collins and Hart. 
Parody Acrobats. 
Hammerstein's Roof Garden. 

After an absence of about a year and a 
half touring on the other side, Collins and 
Hart reappear at home on Hammerstein's 
Roof Garden Mi is week. In addition to the 
comical grotesque acrobatics they presented 
what proved to be the novelty of the bill 
in a "musical jai." After some burlesque 
magic with the animal a toy horn was held 
up to its mouth and the kitten actually 
Mew two notes out of the instrument. 
It was ludicrous and caused hearty laugh- 
ter. The idea of a cat playing a horn is 
ingenious and the more times it may be 
made to blow the funnier it will become. 
No great change has been made in the 
acrobatics. The wire now used to support 
the "top-mounter" is very thin and can not 
be seen against the woodland drop in use. 
Both members of the team work well with 
an acute knowledge of the value of trav- 
esty. 8itne. 



Metropolitan Trio. I / 

Giand Opera Selections. 
Henderson's. 

'Hie familiar scenes from "II Trovatore" 
and "Faust" have been chosen. •The scenic 
settings are above the average and all 
three of the singers have splendid voices. 
They close with the prison scene from 
"Faust," a wise arrangement giving the 
woman of the combination an excellent 
opportunity. She has a soprano voice of 
LM-cat purity and range, the high notes 
l>eing taken without effort. Both men 
are up to standard and altogether the of- 
fering is one of unusual merit. Rush. 




Ai H. Weston and Company. 
Comedy Sketch. 
Hurtig & Seamon's. 

"The New Reporter," the former vehicle 
of Searl and Violet Allen, is in good hands. 
Mr. Weston is the new head of the cast, 
having bought the act. The sketch remains 
unchanged in its essentials. The comedy 
runs somewhat to money changing, which 
is not entirely unknown, but the talk and 
business move rapidly and catch a laugh 
every thirty seconds. The two songs are 
well done and the incidental dance is good. 

Mr. Weston has the proper personality 
for the part and was very well liked. 

Rush. 



i 



1/ 



Friend and Downing. 
Sidewalk Comedians. 
Hurtig & Seamon's. 

Songs and parodies make up the bulk of 
t his act. There is some talk of rather poor 
quality, but the parodies of the Hebrew 
comedian are depended upon for the laughs. 
Friend, son of the late "Manny" Friend, 
the lawyer, takes care of the comedy end. 
The straight man sings popular songs, 
while the other follows with his burlesque, 
leaving the stage each time. They close 
with a parody on "Waiting at the Church," 
which caught the biggest percentage of 
laughs. The text was rather rough comedy, 
but a funny makeup caught the house. 

Rush. 




V 



Barnes and Stockwell. 

Songs. 

Pastor's. 

A singiug team probably from the West 
appearing at Pastor's for the first time, 
with one comedian, while the other plays 
"straight." Some conversation is given 
and the "imaginary" person is worked into 
the talk. This should be dropped and also 
most of the conversation. The straight 
man is good as such, having an exception- 
ally fine baritone voice of good quality and 
fibre, far above the average of a singer 
occupying the position this act does on 
the bill this week. The selections are well 
chosen, one in particular, "Alice, Where 
Art Thou Going?" being especially well 
rendered. The comedy end has a tenor 
voice which, while blending well, does not 
stand too strong by itself. With better 
dressing and more attention given to the 
act in general there is small question but 
that this team will steadily work upward. 
It is not unlikely that the baritone will 
be taken up for some musical comedy. 
His voice, both singing and speaking, is 
a pleasure to hear. Sime. 




Elmer Jerome. 

Monologist. 

Pastor's. 

No 'one seemed to have any knowledge 
where Elmer Jerome graduated from into 
Pastor's this week, where he appears for 
the first time. Offering a monologue in 
blackface with a cigar and voice somewhat 
on the style of Geo. Evans, Mr. Jerome 
gave no indication of coming greatness. 
He needs very much to be coached both in 
the delivery of his material and the han- 
dling of his flexible voice. For a finale 
two bulldogs — Boston bulls — punched an 
anchored bag about. It was neither hu- 
morous nor interesting. dime. 



i 



Manello-Marnitz Troupe. 
Musical Equilibrists. 
Colonial. 

The act is presented entirely as it was 
given at the Hippodrome. The musical 
feature is rather light to hold a place in 
the descriptive caption, being confined to 
their closing feat. It involves four people, 
three of them women. The head and hand 
balancing is exceedingly well done. All 
four look well on the stage. Rush. 




The Dandy Dixie Minstrels. 
New York Roof. 

"Twenty best black bets, including John 
R inker, Mattie Phillips and John Lark- 
ins," is the program description of a col- 
ored troupe appearing on the New York 
Roof as one of the vaudeville features this 
week. It is doubtful if they appear there 
next week. It is a collection of male and 
female singers, "jubilee" and "coon," with 
the stage formation of a minstrel first part, 
having two end men. Songs no longer re- 
taining popularity are sung. No one in 
the company has a voice, rather remarkable 
for colored people. Two girls gave a vocal 
exhibition. The end men reached the 
height of sadness in their attempted 
funnisms and the act never had a chance 
of passing. .Sime. 



V 



The Almonds. 

Novelty Dancing and Music. 

Pastor's. 

Tom and Edith Almond have joined 
hands and are appearing at Pastor's for 
the first time this week as a team. Miss 
Almond was formerly Edith Richards, the 
musical artiste, and IVJr. Almond has es- 
tablished a reputation/ as a roller and ice 
skate dancer. The Specialties of the pair 
have not been changed, but simply com- 
bined to maky a more imposing offering. 
At the present time when the roller skating 
craze is in full sweep, Mr. Almond's danc- 
ing on the wooden wheels is quite apropos, 
and more in keeping with the audience's lik- 
ing than when the pastime was a memory 
only. He has full control of his feet while 
on the rollers and also does a long shoe 
dance in first-class style, this being 
particularly pleasing. Miss Almond's 
playing is sandwiched in between times, 
but the bells should not be played while 
the pedestal dance of Almond on ice skates 
is given. It drowns the music of the steel 
striking the marble to time, that being at- 
tractive in itself. Neither should the 
house be darkened to allow him to mount 
the pedestal, unless that may be arranged 
in some way to be done quickly. The act 
is much more pleasing thrn a single turn 
by either, for there is mu h more variety 
to it. Sime. 



! 



VARIETY 



OUT OP TO 



WN 



ARTISTS' FORUM 




/ 



Wayburn Enterprises. 
"Rain-Dears." 
Proctor's, Albany. 

Albanians had the unusual distinction 
of witnessing Ned Wayburn's latest 
vaudeville novelty entitled the "Rain- 
Dears." It is complete in every detail. 
The scenic setting and costumes are of 
the finest and the girls, captained by 
Neva Ay mar, are pretty. The plot treats 
of a mother's greater love of society than 
of her only child, who runs away in the 
hope that her parents will desire her re- 
turn. Her adventures cover "Toyland," 
"Dreamland," "Iceland" and "Way Down 
Yonder in the Cornfield." The act on the 
whole has received the enthusiastic ap- 
proval of Albany. Martel. 



Welch, Mealey and Montrose. j 
Comedy Acrobats. V 

Majestic, Chicago. 

"Flay Ball," the name of the present 
act presented by Welch (formerly of Keno, 
Welch and Melrose) and his partners, 
Mealey and Montrose, is misapplied until 
near the closing of the sketch, when the 
trio introduce a genuinely funny satire 
on baseball. Welch could modify his facial 
makeup to a degree and still be funny, 
without losing a single effect. The acro- 
batics of Mealey and Montrose are excel- 
lent; some of the tricks, particularly the 
somersaulting, being remarkable. The ac- 
robatic dancing of Mealey, together with 
the unctuous comedy of Welch and the 
hard work of Montrose, make the offering 
worthy the success it achieved. 

Frank, Wiesberg. 



Klein and Clifton. 
Eccentric Dancers. 
Poli's, New Haven. 

Klein and Clifton, eccentric dancers, 
offered a new version of their act week 
of 4th. A new drop showing front of stores 
in which Klein appears as a "dummy" 
and Miss Clifton as a millinery model in 
store window. The use of a stage hand 
as another "dummy" makes an excellent 
street front. The new act has the ad- 
vantage of their former effort and was 
well received. It is the work of Harry 
Klein. The talk is good and their danc- 
ing efforts are shown to advantage. 

W. J. F. 



V 



■ 



Strickland and Duxesbury. 
Musical Act. 
Lafayette, Buffalo. 

E. C. Strickland has been for the past 
three seasons the "rube" character in "Her 
First False Step" company, and Chas. A. 
Duxesbury was formerly of the Lafayette 
and Court street theatre orchestras. The 
act is as good as the average musical act, 
a strong feature being the "rube" charac- 
ter work of Strickland. It is strongly held 
throughout the act, even to the playing of 
the old barnyard dance favorites. The 
music is excellent, but considerable time is 
spent in unnecessary talk. The weak part 
of the act is in the dialogue. Chime. 



LAFAYETTE WINS LAWSUIT. 

The lawsuit wfoich The Great Lafayette 
had against the Lake Erie & Western Rail- 
road came to trial in Indianapolis re- 
cently. Lafayette was awarded $3,000 
for damages sustained to his special car 
and contents, owing to the railroad's negli- 
gence. 



Con flit* your letter a to 190 word* and writs on on* aldo of paper only. 
Anonymous communications will not bo printed. Name of writer must be signed and will be 
held In strict confidence. If desired. 



Wichita, Kans., May 20. 
Editor Variety : 

Sir — Enclosed please find some affidavits 
which I think are sufficient to convict some 
person or persons who used your valuable 
paper for an improper purpose. It 's the 
worst case of misrepresentation that we 
have had to deal with for some time, anJ 
if more evidence is needed to prove we 
are a reliable firm such evidence can be 
submitted. If through the columns of your 
paper you can secure any person or per- 
sons who have ever worked for Olson Bros. 
& Baldwin who have ever failed to receive 
their salaries at least once a week, and 
many of them in advance, we shall thank 
you for securing an affidavit to this ef- 
fect, and we will guarantee you a case of 
perjury on receipt of such affidavit. 

We think we could put a ring around 
the parties who are instrumental iu hav- 
ing the article written that appeared in 
your last week's issue. We are booking for 
several managers in this vicinity, and it is 
needless to say that each manager is re- 
sponsible for the salaries of the acts 
booked by us, and should any manager go 
wrong Olson Bros. & Baldwin cannot be 
held responsible for the salaries stipulated 
in the contracts, and had your correspond- 
ent inquired more fully into this matter the 
injustice done us would have been omitted. 
We have had to fight some pretty mean 
rascals out here, but the party responsible 
for the article mentioned is the meanest we 
have met yet. 

Trusting you will give this article the 
same attention and space you gave to Ihe 
roast, we remain. L. 8. Baldwin. 

[The affidavits mentioned in the above 
letter are merely signed statements by 
Marsh Davis, Addie Davis and L. S. Bald- 
win. Mr. and Mrs. Davis represent that 
their dealings with Olson Bros. & Bald- 
win have been satisfactory, Mr. Davk stat- 
ing further that he was not sick and needy 
in Arizona. Mr. Baldwin saj r s in his state- 
ment that he sublet the VinewooJ Park 
Theatre at Topeka, Kan., to G. Gardell, 
who became responsible for all liabilities 
incurred. Both statements are contradict- 
ed by a Topeka paper of May 18 last. — 
En.] 



Omaha, Neb., May 31. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir — Olson Brothers and Baldwin have 
deserted Wichita and opened another 
vaudeville agency in Kansas City. 
We were told by certain artists who called 
en C. E. Olson in Kansas City that Olson 
said a five-dollar advertisement would 
have suppressed the story you had in 
Variety about Vincwood Park, Topeka, In 
which they were mentioned, and Olson 
said he could get Variety to deny the 
original story any time by sending in an 
advertisement We know the principle 
and policy of the paper are different, so 
beware. 

Ring and Williams. 



New York, June 4. 
Editor Variety : 

Sir — In the last issue of your paper you 
stated that I was doing O'Brien and 
Havel's finish. I will say that the 



"drunken roles" do not belong to him any 
more than to me, but were originated by 
Harry Sefton. which, I suppose, you would 
have said if you had known it. You should 
give the credit where it belongs, or not at 
all if you don't know. 

Sylvan and O'Xcal. 



Baltimore, June 5. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir — Would you kindly note that an 
act playing Pastor's week of May 28 
used an airship. Kindly say that we 
were the first in vaudeville to use an air- 
ship, having done so for the past thirty- 
three weeks, and while booked over the 
Keith and Proctor circuits. We worked 
very hard to get the act and paid big 
money for it. "The Moonlight Maids" 
burlesque company has been using our 
three-sheets and managers have been ask- 
ing if we are with the show. We are at 
Electric Park this week and not at the 
Gotham Theatre, Harlem. 

Field* and Wooley. 



June 2. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir — Saw in a theatrical paper recently 
in ad. by Edwin Baker saying "Not yet 
but soon" and using the title "The Bill 
Poster." Now we have been doing an act 
by that title (copyrighted 1901) for the 
past five years and have played it in most 
of the leading vaudeville theatres from 
coast to coast. We thought he might not 
be aware of the fact (as he claims to 
have been in the legitimate), so we wrote 
him a friendly letter stating so. He an- 
swered by saying "it was impossible to 
copyright a title" and refused to change 
it. Now surely you ought to be able to 
appeal to a man's sense of honor (if he 
has any). If Mr. Baker has any original- 
ity, why does he not select another title? 
As we believe you like to see fair play, 
would deem it a favor if you will kindly 
give this letter space. 

Hansen and Drew. 



June 6. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir — I notice in your last issue an an- 
nouncement of the testimonial to be given 
Mr. George Fuller Golden June 17th. Will 
you please announce my name as one of 
the volunteer artists for a number en that 
occasion? Alice J. Xhaw, 

The Whistler. 



Buffalo, N. Y., June 2. 
Editor Variety : 

Sir— Chas. W. McMahon, the Buffalo 
agent, has l>een ill for some time and in 
consequence unable to answer the many 
letters sent in response to his re- 
cent ad. in your paper. He is now fully 
recovered and at his desk again. 

Mr. McMahon wishes it understood that 
in spite of recent reports he is still lessee 
and sole manager of the Temple Theatre at 
Buffalo, N. Y. Chas. W. McMahon. 



B. A. Myers cabled his New York office 
that he has booked Louis Simon for six 
weeks at the London Pavilion, opening 
there June 3, 1907. Other bookings are 
pending. 



ORRIN BROS.' CIRCUS CLOSED. 

After twenty-five years as circus man- 
agers in Mexico the Orrin Bros, closed their 
show last Saturday in Mexico City and 
will retire, worth, it is estimated, 
$1,000,000. 

Fred Ilogdon, the booking agent for the 
circus, will go to Maine for a long rest. 

There is a possibility that the favorite 
clown of the show, Bell, will carry it on, 
although the reasons causing the Orrins to 
retire may act as a damper upon the fu- 
ture prospects. 

The advent of the "Mexidrome," a sum- 
mer park ptoposition, into Mexico may 
have hastened the action of the brothers. 
The "Mexidrome" will be open the year 
around, excepting one month. The preva- 
lence of fever is also given as a reason, it 
having become difficult to induce good cir- 
cus acts to play so far south. 



IS K. & E. "MERGER" OFF? 

In the early part of the week it was re- 
ported that the "merger" between Klaw & 
Erlanger and Keith was a thing of the past 
owing to differences over the control of the 
finances. 

Later in the week, however, meetings 
were held at Erlancer's office and there is 
a chance that the matter will be patched 
up. 



MADISON SQUARE ROOF MAY NOT 

OPEN. 

Although the opening date for the Madi- 
son Square Garden Roof had been set for 
June 25 with a musical piece, it is more 
than likely that it will not open this sum- 
mer, at least under the management of 
Henry Pincus. 

Mr. Pincus had a few men associated 
with him in the venture, each of whom 
was to put up $1,000. The intending in- 
vestors requested that before the cash was 
deposited a dress rehearsal of the piece 
to be presented should be given, but this 
became impossible even if desirable through 
Ned Nye, the comedian of the. piece, de- 
clining to go ahead unless he saw some 
money. 

As every one seemed to be seeking a 
guarantee before the roof opened, Mr. Pin- 
cus reached the conclusion that there was 
a lack of confidence in his ability as a 
summer amusement purveyor and the 
scheme has been dropped. 



AFTER THE MAJESTIC IN BROOKLYN. 

The Majestic Theatre in Brooklyn, lo- 
cated on Fulton street, opposite Williams' 
Orphean), will become a Keith House if 
ii can be secured. 

The Keith-Proctor firm has been en- 
deavoring to lease the hou. e the past week 
in retaliation for Williams going into Bos- 
ton. 



STAIR WIRES DENIAL. 

The report iu Vakikty last week that 
F. W. Stair in Toronto entertained 
thoughts of leaving the Western Burlesque 
Wheel for the Eastern division called forth 
a telegraphic denial from Mr. Stair to 
his associates in New York. 



OPPOSITION IN NEWARK. 

A Newark brewer named Kruger is said 
to have declared that he had actually signed 
contracts for the Immediate erection of a 
new vauJrville house in his native town. 
The lessees, according to this report, are 
allied with the Morris agency. 



VARIETY 



' P 



* 



A BANK WITH POSSIBILITIES. 

Chicago, June 8. 
The Theatrical National Bank, which 
will begin operation! in this city in the 
fall, according to a statement given out 
by Charles E. Kohl, of Kohl ft Castle, will 
he the only institution of its kind in the 
country and will start with a capital of 
$1,000,000, to Ih« financed by Kohl & Cas- 
tle, tin; Keith-l'roctor-Poli merger and 
John Cort. The institution will be con- 
ducted for thi> purpose of promoting the 
interests of its organizers and the han- 
dling of the finances of theatre managers 
and artists allied with the various cir- 
cuits of theatres controlled or owned by 
the members of the venture. It is said 
that the theatres embraced in the combi- 
nation handle a gross business of $5,000,- 
000 monthly. That amount is expected to 
establish and sustain the bank. Besides 
lending money to members of the merger 
on theatre leases, they will be guaranteed 
protection on the volume of business for 
each week. The first venture to be financed 
by the organization will be the replacing 
of the Orpheum Theatre in San Francisco, 
while another of that name, devoted to 
vaudeville, is being arranged for Milwau- 
kee, to open next season. Another feature 
of the bsftik will be the advancing of money 
to artists who hold contracts with the man- 
agements interested, but in order to obtain 
such a loan the artists will be required to 
give protection through life insurance or 
otherwise. The bank also plans to handle 
all kinds of transportation for artists play- 
ing the various circuits throughout the 
country, and it is said that this department 
will be represented by a passenger agent of 
one of the Western roads in this city. The 
banking house will be located in the Majes- 
tic Theatre Building, where the Orpheum 
Circuit and Western Vaudeville Association 
have their offices. 



SWIFT FINISH FOR "DAINTY 
DUCHESS." 

l^ast week was the final one for Weber 
& Rush's "Dainty Ihielies*" burlesque com- 
pany. It closet its season at Baltimore 
to-night, after struggling through the 
week under difficulties, 

In Philadelphia the week before Clara 
Wieland and Hen Carroll (of the Four 
(arrolls), both members of tin* company, 
were married on t lie stage of the Casino 
Theatre where the show played. 

Fired by an ambit ion to do something 
also of note, the property man of the 
show, named Atchinson, succeeded through 
the removal of the organization to Balti- 
more. With $18 given him for baggage 
transportation as a starter, Mr. Atchinson 
removed some trunks, one containing the 
music, ami "scooted." 

Upon the opening of the show at Balti- 
more Monday, Edgar Bixley, who was 
Travelling with it, conducted the orchestra 

through "faking," and the members of 
the company attended to the stage set- 
tings While also playing their parts. 



ORPHEUM'S NEW BOOKING AR- 
RANGEMENTS. 

Under a lately Instituted Ixmking uf" 
rangetnent l»,\ the Orpheum Circuit, Martin 
Keck, the general manager, in relieved from 
that duty. The bookings hereafter will be 
exclusively attended to b.v Frank Vincent 
in th<' New York office and C. K. Bray ;il 
Chicago. 



THE COMEDY CLUB. 

The new organization of vaudeville ar- 
tiMs lately formed called "The Comedy 
Club" is now well on its way toward per- 
manency. 

Several meeting* have been held and 
committees ap|>ointed. 

The next meeting of the members will 
occur on Sunday in this city, when the 
committee on constitution will rei>ort. The 
constitution itself may be submitted at 
that time for approval. It has been drawn 
under the direction of able legal advice 
and is intended to prove broad enough in 
character to allow of any important action 
being taken in future by the club, without 
further modification. 

The club has already a large member- 
ship, and, seeking to attract only the com- 
edy vaudeville acts, the originators of the 
movement have been surprised at the fa- 
vorable reception unanimously accorded 
the idea. 

Will If, Crea sy is the permanent presi- 
dent. There is aJarge list to select from 
for officers. Kdmund M. Day and Milton 
Nobles are strongly spoken of for first 
and second vice-presidents, respectively. 

There will be an executive board of about 
twenty-five, composed of the leading lights 
of the order. 

Although not so far designed as a secret 
society, members are not revealing details 
of the meetings. The name was discussed 
at the last gathering and it may be changed 
to "The 'Vaudeville' Comedy Club," the 
original name selected having been in use 
by non-prof essionaLs. 

Meeting rooms will be secured shortly, 
and after the acceptance of the constitution 
plans will be formulated and progress rap- 
idly made. 



SHUBERTS MAY LEASE GARRICK. 

Chicago, June 8. 

It is barely possible that Shuberts' Gar- 
rick Theatre in Chicago will be obtained 
under lease for next season. The Shuberta 
have a twenty- week option on the Stude- 
baker Theatre and that may l>e extended 
to a full season. 

The Btudebaker is better adapted for 
the Shuberus as a legitimate playhouse, 
the many musical shows the Garrlck has 
housed destroying it.s usefulness for any- 
thing else excepting that class of plays or 
vaudeville. 

As it will be an expensive proposition to 
build a theatre here under the existing 
stringent regulations, extra • inducements 
are expected to be made to prevail upon 
lite Slmbcrts to lease. 



A NOVEL SCHEDULE. 

I he responsibility for the routing of the 
Western Wheel burlesque companies 
(about forty) devolves upon James 11. Cur- 
tin. manager of the I»ndon Theatre, who 
originated the style of "wheel," each radi- 
ating spoke denoting a company, showing 
the different dates to be played by each in 
the rotation of the spokes. Tor the com- 
ing season Mr. Curtin.has devised at simple 
but extraordinarily efficient method of tell- 
ing at a glance exactly where any show on 
either wheel Is to play for any week, and 
the opposition wheel's attraction for tho 
^.mie time. 

Mr. Curtain intends to have the device 
copyrighted. It will be invaluable to those 
interested. 



LOUISE ALLEN COLLIER WINS SUIT. 

A judgment has been recorded against 
B. A. Myers for $223 in favor of Louise 
Allen Collier, arising over a cancellation of 
contract while Miss Collier was playing 
the Empire Theatre in Newark for week 
of April -. 

After the first show she was closed with- 
out any reason given, and placing the 
matter in the hands of her attorney, I. N. 
JaeobsOBj BJ Park row, suit was insti- 
tuted in the Tenth Municipal District 
Court for the amount of the full week's 

salary, IBQfc 

Although the contract was made be- 
tween Miss Collier and J. Cluckman, the 
manager of the house, the suit was brought 
against B. A. Myers, who had signed the 
contract ostensibly as agent for the man- 
ager, but it was not so specified in writ- 
ing, and Judge Hoffman* before whom the 
case came, decided in favor of the plain- 
tiff. 

It raises a point interesting to vaude- 
ville agents. The court held that as the 
agent had signed the contract as an in- 
dividual, he was legally bound for the 
amount. Whether any liability would 
have attached had he executed the con- 
tract on behalf of the management, or 
whether such signature would have bound 
the management, was not passed upon. 



"THE GIRL IN BLUE" SUES. 

Chicago, June 8. 
A judge 01 the Circuit Court has been 
called upon to act as dancing connoisseur 
and decide the difference between the sinu- 
ous bending and turns used in a terp«i- 
chorean interpretation of an alleged "Per- 
sian poet's song" and the twists of the 
dance known as "can-can" in the $4,000 
suit of Millie De Leon, known as "The 
Girl in Blue," against Whalen & Martell, 
the burlesque managers. It is declared by 
the dancer that she was engaged for one 
season to do the Persian dance which she 
originated, and after several performances 
of the "poetic" evolution the managers dis- 
covered a resemblance to the "can-can" 
and requested her to change it. She re- 
fused. The contract was cancelled and 
the suit followed. It is said by her at- 
torney, Adolph Marks, that if the legal 
authorities are not up in Persian history 
sufficiently to decide the definition of the 
dance correctly, Miss l>e Leon will give 
the movements of the dance in the court 
room, attired in the gauzy gowns used on 
the stage. 



TWENTY YEARS AFTER. 

Toronto, Ont., June 8. 

After knocking about in pawnshops and 
from hand to hand for nearly twenty 
rears, a Kiel Rebellion war medal was re- 
stored to its owner, R. C. Newman, stage 
manager of Shea's Theatre, under singular 
circumstances. Mr. Newman saw service 
in the Northwest in 1885 with the 10th 
Battalion Royal Grenadiers, and took part 
in the engagement at Batoche. On the 
regiment's return home medals were pre- 
sented to every memiber of the regiment. 

In Septeml>er, 1887, the medal was 
stolen from Mr. Newman. 
Last week he received a note from his 
comrade in arms, John Woods, of the Ar- 
cade Printing Company, stating that the 
lost decoration had been located in the 
possession of one of his fellow employes, 
who had found it among the effects of an 
aunt, recently deceased. 

The singular part of the story is that 
the medal should l>e returned to its owner 
on the eve of the 21st anniversary of the 
battle of Batoche in which he took part. 
Batoche was fought May 12, IH85. 

WEBER WANTS VAUDEVILLE. 
The Weber Music Hall on Broadway 
was offered to Mark Luescher by Joe 

Weber as a vaudeville theatre, to be con- 
ducted as such excepting from January 1 
to the middle of May in each year. 

It is understood that Mr. Luescher de- 
clined to lease the house on those terms, 
although willing to accept it without re- 
serve. 



KEITH'S PAWTUCKET THEATRE 
AFIRE. 
l'awtucket, R. I., June 8. 

A lire broke out in the New l'awtucket 
Theatre here, owing to some defect in the 
moving )tMnrc machine. 

It was not serious and the theatre suf- 
fered no loss. Imt the tin* was a smoky 
one, and Stage Manager Nick Williams, 
who investigated the source of the llames, 
barely escaped being smothered. 



NEW ORLEANS HOUSE TO LET. 

New Orleans, June S. 

It appears to have escaped notice that 
New Orleans has a theatre now building 
adapted for vaudeville. 

It is owned by a company of which F. 
B. Sullivan, an attorney of this city, is 
the representative. Mr. Sullivan has of- 
fered the house to Eastern vaudeville man- 
agers. 

The Shuberts are unable to take the 
management owing to the difficulty en- 
countered in "jumps," the Klaw & Krlan- 
ger having the surrounding territory com- 
pletely covered. 

It could be used as a vaudeville theatre, 
though, in conjunction with the Jake Wells 
houses, giving an entrance into the city 
from the southernmost point of the new- 
proposed Wells vaudeville circuit in an 
overnight ride. 



TO PLAY "RIP VAN WINKLE." 

The veteran stage manager of Hyde Ac 
Behman's Adams Street Theatre in Brook- 
lyn, John P. 1 Li 11, will leave that position 
to travel over the vaudeville circuits if 
time for a scenic production of "Ivip Van 
Winkle" is secured. 

Mr. Hill will play the title role, having 
had a "try out" with the sketch. Pour 
people will be carried, end there will be 
^ight scenes using ten special drops. 



A TALKING MOVING PICTURE. 

There is on its way to this country 
through the agency of Tit rot & (lirard a 
talking moving picture, the "talking" be 
ing arrived at through a phonograph at- 
tachment. 

The pictures arc colored and the effect 
is said to be verv realistic. It will ar- 
rive shortly and will first be seen at 
"Dreamland," Conev Island. 



EDEN MUSEE TOO EXPENSIVE. 

One of the managers booking through 
the Mollis office has been looking over the 
Eden Musee property with a view to trans 
forming il into a vaudeville house. It will 
require entirely too much money to prop 
erly convert it into a theatre passing ill 
spection by the building department, he is 
afraid. 



VARIETY 



CIRCUS STRANDED. 

Ifc's Moines, la., Juno 8. 

The Great Cooke & Barrett Circus 
stranded at Allison, la., May 17. The 
show hod been playing to poor business 
for three or four weeks in Northern Iowa. 
Many of the performers and workingraen 
had not received wages and decided to 
leave. William 1*. Hall, the horseman, is 
a stockholder, and no doubt will assist the 
organization, which was shipped directly 
to Mr. Hall's home at Lancaster, Mo. The 
t'ooke & Barrett show was the remains 
of what was known as the Famous W. H. 
Harris Nickel Plate Show and consisted 
of sixteen cars. 

The Sells-Floto Shows are making some 
very long jumps this season. They opened 
at Wichita Falls, Tex., April 6, played 
Ft. Worth, Dallas, Houston, Galveston and 
many other Texas towns, then jumped 
into Kansas, and on May 7 showed at 
Kansas City, Mo. North through Des 
Moines, la., St. Paul, Minn., and are 
billed for Duluth May 28. This consti- 
tutes one of the longest trips ever made 
by a circus in such a short time from Mex- 
ico to Canada. 

One of the Texana Sisters, expert rifle 
shots with Yankee Robinson Shows, w r as 
accidentally shot and wounded at Cum- 
berland, Ta., last week. 



TOM HEARN TO RESIDE HERE. 

"The Lazy Juggler," Tom Hearn, sails 
to-day for Liverpool. Mr. Hearn will play 
his engagement* on the other side, return- 
ing in the fall to the United States to play 
the Keith circuit. 

Mr. Hearn says he has purchased some 
land and will locate as an American citi- 
zen after his return. 



GEO. HOMANS EXPLAINS. 

When asked about the rumor that he had 
cancelled time given over the Jake Wells 
circuit of Southern parks. Geo. Homans, 
who booked the artists, said: "There has 
been no time cancelled. All acts will play 
as agreed. In one case at Montgomery, 
Ala., I was obliged to shift the bill some- 
what. A team I refused time to are re- 
sponsible for the rumor." 



NEW VAUDEVILLE HOUSE IN 
ATLANTA. 

The new vaudeville house now building 
in Atlanta, (in., will be under the control 
of the Jake Wells circuit and booked by 
Geo. Homans. There will be four vaude- 
ville theatres altogether on that circuit, the 
three others to be selected from thetwenty- 
two theatres under the Wells management. 



SOME NEW HAMMERSTEIN SONGS. 

Since his return from Europe, or per- 
haps l>efore he left, Oscar Hammerstcin 
dashed off a couple of musical numbers 
of the "popular" order. Both will soon 
be placed upon sale and will bo published 
by the new firm of Cooler, Kendis & 
Paley. 



BOOKINGS POSTPONED AGAIN. 
The Keith Booking Agency has again 
postponed the general routing of arts, this 
time until June -.'». The artists, having 
been informed <»f the further delay, arc of 
the impression that the Keith olliee is at 
tempting to lot ate itself before giving fu- 
ture time. 



BRUGGEMANN GETS HIS. 

A. M. Bruggemann with vaudeville 
houses in Iloboken and Paterson, N. J., 
and expectations of one in Jersey City, 
has been disapopinted in the latter hope. 

Mr. Bruggemann selected a site in Jer- 
sey City. S. Z. Poli also decided on the 
same town, which is history. 

The Keith people illustrated to Mr. 
liniggemann the exact manner in which 
Poli who wag not then in the Keith 
Agency would become opposition to his 
Iloboken house and prevailed upon Brug- 
gemann on the plea of the Keith "mag- 
nificent protection" scheme to enter their 
otlice with his other two houses, taking in 
also at the same time Jo Paige Smith, 
who had attended to the Bruggemann 's 
bookings. 

After securing the German manager the 
Keith people acquired the Bijou Theatre in 
Jersey City, and afterward Poll. The ac- 
quisition of Poli cleared the Jersey City 
field excepting Bruggemann, who was then 
told it had been all a mistake; he couldn't 
huild in the same town with a Keith 
theatre, and Mr. Bruggemann won't, al- 
though by all the ethics of vaudeville the 
town rightfully belongs to him. 

Bruggemann isn't saying much. To a 
manager properly trained under the Keith 
regime it isn't safe to overspeak, espe- 
cially if you have two other vaudeville 
houses and no profitable vocation excepting 
their management. 



HALLEN AND HART SCHEME OFF. 

The reason for the abandonment of the 
deal bringing the old team of Hallen and 
Hart together in a new play by George M. 
Cohan is that Joe Hart wanted the big 
end of the scheme. Cohan and his man- 
ager, Sam Harris, were to put up the 
money and furnish the piece and Hallen 
and Hart were to receive a reasonable 
salary and a percentage. At the last mo- 
ment Hart thought that he should re- 
ceive a larger salary than Hallen and 
bickered and haggled until Cohan threw 
up the scheme in disgust. 



DISGUISED THEMSELVES. 

The Meredith Sisters, a pair of colored 
girls who were seen in these parts some 
time ago, but who have been for the paet 
two years in Europe and South Africa, 
will return to open at Hammerstein's 
Roof about the middle of August. They 
will show six changes of costume and 
carry, so it is promised, four sets of 
scenery. In South Africa race prejudice 
made it necessary for them to bill them- 
selves as American Indian squaws. They 
are mulatto** and got away with the pose. 



"PARSON" DAVIES SUES. 

New Orleans, June S. 
Charles K. ("Parson") Davies, one of 
the lessees of Athletic Park, has filed a 
petition in the Civil District Court 
through his attorneys to prevent the Pain 
people from giving their military and 
naval spectacle at City Park. He also 
seeks an injunction preventing the park 
commission from leasing the grounds for 
any purposes where admission will be 
charged. The niurl ban taken the matter 
under advisement. 

BECK MAY. 

William Courtloigh will probably be 
signed for the Orpheum road show unless 
Martin Beck elect s t«» change his mind. 



VAUDEVILLE ALL OVER MICHIGAN. 

Jackson, Mich., June S. 
The season for vaudeville in Michigan 
will be over in a week. From the present 
outlook there will not be a town of any 
size in the State that will not have a 
first-class vaudeville house in the fall. 

W. S. Butterfield will have a circuit of 
six theatres, including Jackson, Flint, 
Battle Creek and Kalamazoo, besides two 
others tor which leases will nor be exe- 
cuted until July 1. Mr. Butterfield's 
P.ijou Theatre in Kalamazoo wi'l have its 
seating capacity increased to 900 Septem- 
ber 1. He will also have a new theatre 
In Jackson seating a like number wkh 
stage accommodations for the largest 
vaudeville acts. 

With new houses building in Lansing 
and Bay City, Michigan will be able to 
offer a valuable circuit for booking pur- 
poses if the various managers here get to- 
gether. 



"BIM" ALL READY. 

It has for years been the boast of Nixon 
& Zimmerman, the Philadelphia end of the 
theatrical syndicate, that there was no op- 
portunity to secure a site in their town for 
the erec f ion of a theatre, other than at a 
prohibitive price. Now comes Myer Bim- 
berg, alias "Bim the Button Man," with a 
proposition to erect a house in the Quaker 
City in a central location for anybody who 
will produce. "Bim" will shortly an- 
nounce the site of the new house he con- 
templates erecting on West 116th street. 
He must acquire title to one more lot first, 
the owner of which is holding out for a 
larger price than the "Button Man" thinks 
it is worth. 



MORRISON'S OPENS. 

Morrison's Theatre opened at llock- 
away Beach last Sunday. Strenuous ef- 
forts were necessary to secure a license. 
The fire department refused to pass on the 
place. Morrison made the alterations ex- 
acted by the authorities, employing a num- 
ber of men working day and night up to the 
time for opening the doors. Sunday con- 
certs onb will be given until June 25, 
when the regular summer season of vaude- 
ville will commence. 



"SUNDAYS" AT UNION SQUARE. 

Commencing next season Sunday night 
concerts will be given at Keith's Union 
Square Theatre, that marking the begin- 
ning of the seventh day's entertainment at 
each of the Keith houses where such shows 
are allowed by the municipal authorities. 



ABANDONS VAUDEVILLE PLAN. 

Chicago, June 8. 
The vaudeville season planned for the 
Chicago Opera House has been abandoned. 
Stock opera will be given next season in- 
stead. All the vaudeville bookings have 
been transferred to other houses. 



PRETTY HIGH FOR VAUDEVILLE. 

The ground rent asked for a lease of the 
southeast corner of Forty-third street and 
Broadway, the site reported the Keith- 
Proctor firm is looking for, is $70,000 a 
year for_ twenty-one years, after which 
there would have to be an appraisal and a 
renewal based on the price set, which 
might be fabulous. Oscar Hammerstein 
endeavored to secure it four years ago, 
and the owner, a widow who resides in 
Europe, asked $45,000 a year. Hammer- 
stein accepted and the price was promptly 
tilted to $50,000. The process waa re- 
peated la jumps of $5,000 until $00,000 
was reached, when negotiations were de- 
clared off. 



OSCAR WROTH. 

Oscar Hammerstein himself is authority 
for the statement thai if the vaudeville war 
waxes too hot h<- may be induced to trans- 
form his new Manhattan Opera House into 
a variety theatre. 

"EDDIE" SHAYNE IS WELL AGAIN. 

After a spell of sickness si:<c his ic- 
tnrn from the West, "Eddie*' Shayne is 
about nowadays looking perfectly well. 



ALI LEAVES HURTIG & SEAM0N. 

"Joe" Ali, the leader of the Hurtig & 
Seamon orchestra at the 125th street 
house, will close his career with the firm 
to-morrow night after a servitude of sev- 
eral years in that capacity. 

A misunderstanding with Harry Seamon 
is understood to be the cause. 

The music hall winds up its season at 
the same time, the closing date having been 
fixed a week earlier than intended, owing 
to the weather. 



WEBER PARTICULAR SOMETIMES. 
The Joe Weber company — some of them 
at least — are angry because they only re- 
ceived one day's notice of the close of the 
season. Weber, by the by, insisted on a 
line on the printing for the George Fuller 
Golden benefit that Stella Mayhew would 
appear "by kind permission of Joe Weber." 
Miss Mayhew will not play the Golden 
benefit. 



FLETCHER HAS A "GIRL ACT." 

Before leaving for Europe Charles Leon- 
ard Fletcher will organize a "girl act" with 
a tragedy incident, using six young women 
and four men. 

Mr. Fletcher says the idea is entirely 
original and expects to find ready booking. 



"NOT YET— BUT SOON." 

Concluding that the former title de- 
cided upon— "My Wife Won't Let Me"— 
as not suitable for his sketch, Max Brooks 
has selected "Not Yet— But Soon" as the 

name. 



SHUBERTS TAKE ANOTHER IN 
BROOKLYN. 

The Shubert Brothers have added the 
Imperial Theatre, Brooklyn, Wm. T. 
drover's late "lemon," to their circuit and 
after some minor alterations will open it 
in the fall. 



GARRY OWEN, SINGLE. 

Little Garry Owen is going to forsake 
his mother on the stage and will appear 
alone shortly in a protean comedy spe- 
cialty involving six characters. 

"Tnfant prodigies." "child wonders" and 
other youthful freaks who have been bene- 
fit ed by press work pale into insignificance 
alongside of this mere baby with the 
brain of a man, retaining at the same 
time the youthful charms of a frolicsome, 
fun loving youngster. 



MEYERS GOES WITH WOODS. 

Sam Meyers, Wilmer & Vincent's gen- 
eral manage* for the past season, has en- 
pngod himself for the future w?'h Al H. 
\V< ods. 



10 



VARIETY 



Shows of the Week 



By Sime 



HAMMERSTEIN'S ROOF GARDEN. 

Ojscar Haramerstein each year announces 
the opening of the summer season by al- 
lowing the public to march up to his roof 
over the Victoria and Relasco theatres. 
I^ast Monday was the day selected for the 
present year, and the crowd answering to 
the call packed the aerial resort to its 
capacity. 

Excepting the addition of two Angora 
goats, a chicken incubator, some little 
"hens" and a few turkeys, the country 
scene remained the same. 

The bill is a heavy one, composed mostly 
of headline names, and full of comedy. 
Owing to the number of features on the 
program, injury was caused through po- 
sition. 

The three Constantine sisters arrived 
from "The Vanderbilt Cup" wearing the 
name openiug costumes used in that piece, 
but closing their acrobatic dancing with a 
neat suit. The finish is so strongly re- 
mindful of the old Wayburn style that 
some of the acrobatic work should be left 
for the finale. The girls are hard work- 
ers and were a 'strong number for the 
opening one. 

The Camillc Trio on the horizontal bars 
with nothing but comedy of the broad kind 
pleased, while Greene and Werner in 
"Babes in the Jungle" were obliged to dis- 
pense with their most effective piece of 
stage setting. Mr. Greene has cut some 
of the facial contortions he formerly gave 
when announcing the song used. They 
were the heaviest losers in applause through 
position, as the house was still coming in. 

'Something went wrong with Selma 
Hraatz, the girl juggler, at the beginning 
and she did not recover herself, closing 
with a fiasco, one of the torches falling. 
The failure to darken the house completely 
may have been the cause for that, however. 

The falls and pantomime of Rice and 
Prevost were laughed at in much the same 
way they have been for the past three 
years at this roof garden. Rice has im- 
proved his pantomime work as the clown. 

Captain Woodward's seals amused the 
audience and Lalla Selbini and Collins and 
Hart are reviewed under New Acts. 

Cliffe Berzac with his animals, includ- 
ing the "unridable" donkey and revolving 
table, has the size of the stage to contend 
with, although the act is always a laugh 
producer, and the four Bard brothers in 
their unexcelled acrobatic performance were 
unmistakably received with favor. 

The Kitabanza troupe of Japanese with 
a wonderfully made and expensive back 
drop closed the show, having been pre- 
ceded by Abie Mitchell and her "Tennes- 
see Students." It's the same without Er- 
nest Hogan as when shown before over 
here, having been to Europe meanwhile. 
The leader is the same, Miss Mitchell sings, 
sometimes on and more often off the key, 
while the dancing is liked. There is a 
mulatto girl with blonde hair among the 
crowd who excites some curiosity as to her 
race. She should be made to wear a black 
wig on the stage. She looks a freak with- 
out it. 



Owing to the illness of Crace Ualliday, 
of Mallory Brothers, Brooks and Halliday, 
the quartet was obliged to cancel its sum- 
mer bookings held over the Keith circuit 
and will remain at their home in Jackson- 
ville. 111., until Miss Halliday recovers. 



PASTOR'S. 

With the arrival of the warm weather 
there is the usual slackening off in the 
Pastor bill. Although the house remains 
open all summer as customary, provision 
is made against a too expensive show. 

The Mimic Four heads the program, 
having one of the original quartet, Art 
Brook. The new members are Christine 
Cook, Grace Jennings and Frank Braid. 
No important change has been made in 
the sketch called "The Day After." Miss 
Cook as the maid proved satisfactory, but 
Miss Jennings appears too stiff. Both girls 
are fairly good looking. Mr. Braid as the 
Senator needs to give the part more bur- 
lesqued dignity. The act scored a good- 
sized hit, being obliged to finish out its 
repertoire in "one." 

Crawford and Manning, reunited, gave 
the old act, finishing with the travesty 
trapeze exhibition, and Selbini and Gro- 
vini on bicycles did a variety of tricks. 
The male rider does not handle the jug- 
gling on the wheel with sureness, and as 
he persists in a trick until perfected it 
causes the turn to drag. 

Three distinct characters were assumed 
by M. E. Nibbe, of Nibbe and Bordouex. 
He opens as a German, changes to an Ital- 
ian, and sings a "coon" song in a capital 
Southern dialect. The Italian is good, 
while the German could stand much im- 
provement. Mr. Nibbe 's comedy methods 
are unique in some respects, considerably 
more quiet and effective than his voice. 
Miss Bordouex wears a handsome white 
lace gown or covering in the opening, con- 
cealing the Italian costume beneath. They 
were well received, and Nibbe should work 
out all his ideas of comedy. They will 
probably develop a value. 

The Holdsworths with songs and music 
captured the audience aided by dancing. 
One song, "If the man in the Moon were 
a Coon," is a pretty number and helped 
to clinch the success. Another selection, 
a parody written by Mrs. Iloldsworth, has 
a catchy melody and is an excellent idea 
for a topical song to be kept up to date. 

The banjo playing and exercise is an 
unimportant item, although the audience 
also liked that 

The Weston Sisters come here from a 
burlesque company, finishing a singing act 
with a boxing bout not to be desired, and 
Annie Chandler imitated Fay Templeton, 
Ethel Levy and Vesta Victoria. Miss 
Chandler's error is in not costuming the 
impersonations. She has a good resem- 
blance in voice excepting Miss Levy, and 
could do much more if a complete change 
act were attempted. The Victoria song 
called several encores. 

Flatow and Dunn in blackface worked 
hard to good result, although appearing 
too early for a proper gau^e, and Barnes 
and Stockwell, Elmer Jerome and the 
Almonds will be found under New Acts. 

For the first time this season the pian- 
ists at Pastor's have been held in to their 
seats throughout the performance with two 
exceptions. Mr. Brodie, who plays for the 
early show, received three minutes grace 
during one act, and Mike Bernard gains 
al»out four minutes during the closing 
number. 



NEW YORK ROOF. 

Still wearing its nom de plume of "The 
Wistaria Grove," the New York Roof 
opened for business last Monday evening 
under the management of William A. 
Brady and Joseph Hart. 

Not alone was Mr. Hart programmed as 
one of the managers, but he was also down 
as part responsible for the disguised vaude- 
ville entertainment offered as a closing 
number under the title of "Seeing New 
York." Clifton Crawford was another who 
had a hand in it, while A. Baldwin Sloane 
wrote the music. 

The piece started at 10 MO with biograph 
pictures of the different characters after- 
ward appearing on the stage, leading up to 
a country yokel coming to New York 
City to meet a "rich widow" through an 
appointment made from a newspaper "per- 
sonal." 

This slight thread is the basis for six 
scenes in this metropolis. 

There are a number of girls and boys in 
the company besides sixteen "principals," 
chief among whom are Clifton Crawford, 
Carrie DaMar, Al Leach and Cheridah 
Simpson. 

The skit rushes off well with a march 
song sung by Marion Mills and an effective 
finale in a vocal selection of Miss Simp- 
son's, but the bottom drops out after that. 

At eleven o'clock on a sultry 
evening, when every one was 
speculating how much longer the 
show would last, Mr. Crawford launched 
himself to tho footlights, giving his "spe- 
cialty." It occurs in the second scene, 
and while the audience is waiting for an 
acrobatic dance or something to liven up 
a dead situation it hears a recitation of 
Kipling verse. Miss DeMar follows in the 
next scene, standing in front of a pictorial 
sixteen-story "Flatiron" building, with her 
former variety "turn" to be replaced im- 
mediately afterward by Mr. Leach and his 
three Rosebuds. (Everything else amusing 
had long since closed on Broadway by this 
time, but there were still three scenes 
and six songs to be gone through. The 
audience balked, leaving the roof in small 
parties. 

There is no material in the skit for any- 
one to work on. The situations have been 
mainly removed from burlesque, and the 
music is hardly noticeable. The male 
chorus have good voices concealed amongst 
them, but "Seeing New York" will never 
carrv a crowd. 

Before intermission six vaudeville num- 
bers were given, including Yamamoto 
brothers, the six Proveanies who were the 
hit of the whole bill, Spissell brothers and 
Mack, Salerno and the Dandy Dixie Min- 
strels (under New Acts). 



DE FREECE WANTS ADE'S PLAY. 

Walter DeFreece, husband of Vesta Til- 
ley and manager for a circuit of theatres 
in England, is negotiating with Henry W. 
Savage for the English rights to the suc- 
cessful George Ade rural comedy drama, 
"The County Chairman." Mr. Savage 
fears that the piece is entirely too Ameri- 
can and cites, as another reason for hold- 
ing off, the fate of "The Prince of Pilsen" 
on the other side. 



The Spook Minstrels leave for Europe 
July 4. Only two of the original company 
will go. 



Salerno leaves for Europe directly after 
his engagement on the New York Theatre 
Roof Garden. 



LONDON GOSSIP. 

May 29. 

Leicester square and its vicinity, "the 
Forty-second street" of London, has an 
animated appearance at the present time. 
The Americans may be seen out in force 
any fine afternoon between 12 and 3:30. 

The principal topic among the artiste 
is the Keith-Prootor-Poli amalgama- 
tion. Rose Stahl, the "Bernhardt of the 
Vaudevilles," as the papers have named 
her here, has caused a sensation at the 
Palace, London. M. A. Shea arrived on 
Monday, 28th, after a tour through France 
and Germany on the lookout for talent. 
II. H. Feiber is expected to arrive here 
on the 29th. 

Jennie Jacobs has the following artists 
for a forty weeks tour of America: Ada 
Martine; B. H. Almon, hand balancer; 
Hall and Earle, eccentrics; Sisters Alberts, 
singers and dancers; Spray Sisters, 
dancers; the Five Obracs, acrobats; Dora 
Letine, dancer; Ray llanvar, burlesque 
artist, and many others. 

Ella Shields returns to America shortly. 
She has been a big success here. Conway 
and Leeland are going better than ever. 
Cliff Ryland is as good as ever. Daisy 
Mayer is on the Stoll tour. Billy Tucker, 
the ball puncher, is on the De Freece cir- 
cuit. Stime and Evans are on the Stoll 
tour. The Leslie Brothers are at the 
Hippodrome, London. 

Ferguson and Mack are on the Stoll 
tour and are introducing the Sisters Dim- 
ple to roars of laughter. Bell Belmont 
opens at the Holborn Empire, London, 
July 16. De Vere and Ken wick have just 
returned to town after a provincial tour. 
Kelly and Ashby, the original bounding 
billiardists, opened at the Alhambra, 
Leicester square, Monday last and made 
a success. Kelly and Reno are going on 
the Continent this week. 

The Casino Comedy Four have "caught 
on" here. 

I think Harry Tate will be a hit in 
America with his sketch "Fishing." 

There is another new music hall paper 
started here by an American, The Theat- 
rical and Sports Review. Bert A. Dor- 
man is at the helm and it looks as if it 
had come to stay. Nelson's Newsboys are 
starring this week at the Empire, Belfast. 
Morris and Morris left here May 26 to 
try their luck in America. Eugene Strat- 
ton has just returned from the Continent. 
Chergwin, the "White-eyed Kaffir," is 
popular over here with American artists. 
Josephine Arthur Burke, daughter of J. 
K. Burke, of Keith's Booking Agency, is 
to sing in Shakespearean roles at Windsor 
and a number of other places during the 
month of June. On June 2 the following 
artists sail on the Kildonan Castle from 
Southampton: Malcolm Scott, Julian Mac. 
Romo and Romani, May More Duprez and 
Libby Arnold Blondell. Among those that 
arrive on the same day are the Mac- 
Naughtons, Alice Lloyd, the Brothers 
Home and May Evans. La Guerrera has 
made a success at the Palace in "The 
Daughter of the Mountains." 

Things have never been so quiet here 
in the music hall world as at the present 
time. Mr. Stoll is booking from week to 
week. Fougere, the French artist, put on 
a dance at the Holborn Empire called 
"La Maxixe" that they wouldn't have 

stood at the old Paresis Hall. Ualiy. 



VARIETY 



11 



Shows of the Week 



By Rush 



HENDERSON'S. 

The bill runs much more smoothly than 
last week, but there are still annoying 
gaps between the acts. The waits are 
short and could easily be covered over by 
a little music. They are made to seem 
longer by the orchestra suspending opera- 
tions. 

TTie Metropolitan Grand Opera Trio 
(under New Acts) and Klein, Ott Brothers 
and Nicholson are the headliners. The 
musical quartet is heard to good 
effect here. They have always been dis- 
tinguished in the vaudeville theatres for 
their brass ensembles. At Henderson's, 
where volume of sound is as much to be 
desired as quality, the effect was excellent. 

The Three Brothers La Maze went very 
well. It is a fast acrobatic turn with well 
handled falls and fair knockabout comedy. 
In the straight acrobatic department the 
trio have some good feats. 

The Dixie Serenaders hold over for the 
second week. The act is unchanged, the 
best occurring in the early half where 
the concert singing of the men is featured. 
Since the act was shown in Williams' 
Brooklyn houses a considerable amount 
of talk has been eliminated to great ad- 
vantage. 

The Reid Sisters, formerly featured 
with Ned Nye and his "Rollicking Girls," 
are doing a regulation ''sister act." The 
girls have not strong enough voices to 
sing effectively in opposition to the noise 
that floats in from Coney Island's Bowery, 
but they do a fast and entertaining dance, 
dress well and get their share of approval. 

Bowers, Walters and Crooker have im- 
proved immensely in their Rube dances 
and burlesque trapeze work, 

Henry Evans, the boy soprano who was 
seen at Keith's last week, was placed 
early on the bill. The boy has a strong 
voice of good quality and won an enthusi- 
astic reception, due in a large degree to 
his youth. 

The Cravers, billed as "lariat experts," 
are guilty of many slips. The use of a 
decidedly pretty girl who is also a clever 
horsewoman as assistant aids the act 
materially, but both she and the man fall 
down on their tricks too frequently. 
There is a little incidental talk which 
should be extended. 

Rittcr and Foster have a neat act. 
Miss Foster brings her "airship" line of 
talk from "Smiling Island," played this 
season by the "Casino Girls" burlesque 
company, of which she was a member, 
while Max Ritter does good coon shouting 
and a lively dance or two. 

McCrea and Pool, sharpshooters, have 
an excellent act. Pool is little more than 
an assistant, serving for the greater part 
as a sort of "human target." The feature 
of the act is the simultaneous breaking 
of two pipes, one in the mouth of the as- 
sistant and the other in his hand. For 
this trick Mr. McCrea uses two rifles, one 
at each shoulder. They were well liked. 

Lillian Maynard does the familiar sou 
brette, including the inevitable song 
"plugged" h* » box. She has a pleasing 
stage personality and a good voice. A 
sprightly dance would liven up her act. 

Among the others were Kriesel's ani- 
mals, Renz and Pantzer and Hills and 
Wilson. 



COLONIAL. 

An audience that filled the Colonial 
Theatre to capacity on the warmest even- 
ing of the week to witness one of the 
most expensive bills of the season was the 
answer given to the oft -repeated query, 
"Does the Williams policy pay?" 

Vesta Tilley is in her last week in this 

country. The audience demanded four 

songs and the English comedienne occu- 
pied the stage for thirty-five minutes, al- 
though she did not come on until 10:15. 

Edna Luby has cut out her impersona- 
tion of George M. Cohan to the distinct 
betterment of her act, its place being taken 
by that of Vesta Victoria. Miss Luby 
went through the whole of her repertoire, 
even to the rather lengthy impersonation 
of Katie Barry, and took half a dozen 
bows. 

Dave Genaro and Ray Bailey appear in 
a straightaway dancing and singing 
sketch, having abandoned pretty much all 
the talking and comedy business they used 
before. The pair are always strong enough 
to carry themselves in the fastest com- 
pany. 

Ralph Johnson, the trick cyclist, is seen 
here for the first time outside of the Hip- 
podrome, where he has been a feature all 
season. His act is a sensational one, but 
not so good for vaudeville purposes as at 
the Thompson & Dundy establishment, for 
the reason that the setting up of his 
elaborate apparatus leaves a wide gap in 
the action. This defect was not so notice- 
able at the Hippodrome, where Mr. John- 
son had room for his riding while the ap- 
paratus for his somersault was being 
placed. A colored comedy assistant was of 
material aid to him. Johnson was well 
liked. 

The Three Roses, a trio of nice-looking 
girls, daintly dressed, opened the bill. 
Their music is no less attractive than their 
appearance, except perhaps for the violin 
solo, which ran very much to technical 
frills. 

Charles A. Mason and Lew Kelly have 
opened up a rather unique vein of comedy. 
There is an excellent opportunity for 
laughmaking in the combination of "dope 
fiend" and German dialect comedian. Some 
of the lines have more humor than the 
mere jumbling of senseless incongruities. 
Charles A. Mason does very well with his 
comedy roje and Sue Stillman makes a 
satisfactory "feeder." 

Ferry Convey, billed as "The Musical 
Clown," is stronger in the comedy depart- 
ment than in his music making. He had 
a screamingly funny bit of business in- 
volving an unseen bird and a cartload of 
dummy eats and won more laughs than 
usually falls to the lot of a clown working 
alone. 

Mabel Hite and Walter Jones scored 
their usual hit and the Manello-Marnitz 
troupe of musical equilibrists (under Now 
Acts) were seen for the first time outside 
the Hippodrome. 



TWENTY-THIRD STREET. 

The Five Lecussions, the Hippodrome 
circus act which was to have played an 
exclusive engagement this week at the 
Twenty-third Street, had to close after 
the Monday matinee. It was found at the 
eleventh hour that there was not enough 
stage room for it. The carriage was ac- 
cordingly cut out and the act lost much 
of its value. Monday night Mills and 
Harlan, hand-to-hand balancers, were 
brought over from the Union Square to 
fill the gap. The Todd-Judge family of 

four acrobats came into the bill for the 
remainder of the week. 

The two new acts of the bill, Ruth 
Allen in "The Girl," and the Lasky-Rolfe 
Quintet, are under the New Acts. Henry 
Lee is the headliner. Lee's "likenesses" 
are careful studies. He does not reach 
after his effects by the usual expedient of 
accentuating the peculiarities of the great 
men he impersonates, but makes his figures 
a.s true to the originals as possible. In 
this way he loses something of the popular 
appreciation he might gain by a touch of 
what might be called caricature. The act 
is skillfully laid out, the time between 
changes being entertainingly filled and the 
talk of Lee's celebrities in good taste and 
at the same time interesting. 

Paul Barnes, the tramp monologi.st, wins 
laughter with talk that is just a collection 
of stories without any pretence at con- 
tinuity. The monologue begins with a 
song that paves the way for an opening 
gag. From that point the monologist 
j umps about from story to story in rather 
jerky fashion. 

Smith and Campbell have their same 
sidewalk conversation with the usual abu.se 
of the smaller man and the stunt with the 
new song. Stinson and Merton are another 
well-known pair on the bill. 

Millie Bertina and Florence Broekway 
open. The larger girl does a fair acrobatic 
dance with a bit of contortion and her 
partner a good buck dance. Both dress 
well. 

The Todd-Judge family closing show 
make up a decidedly good acrobatic quar- 
tet. The youngster is apparently about 
fifteen years old. lie is very light but 
does some clever tumbling. The under- 
(dander has a good trick or two with this 
lad. All four do splendidly in their Kisley 
tricks. 

"Plantation I 'as times" is tie- title of a 
good sketch introducing the Whitman Sis- 
ters and Willie Robinson, all colored. In 
their singing they reproduce the real Negro 
quality and the comedy vein is well sus- 
tained by the little dancer. 



WHY KOHL LINGERED. 

Messrs. Kohl and Castle and Martin 
Beck are the real owners of "I lis Honor 
the Mayor." which is being presented at 
the New York Theatre. Now that its suc- 
cess is assured there is no longer any need 
for concealing the fact. 



MAY TAKE H. & B. NOW. 

Owing to the policy of Percy Williams 
as evidenced by the leasing of the Em- 
pire Theatre in Jioston, the Keith Booking 
Agency may reconsider Its determination 
not to accept Hyde Sc Behman of Brook- 
lyn as one of the Agency's members and 
the Brooklyn firm may soon jro in. 

Hyde & Behman together with Huilig 
& Searnon have been refused! admittance 
up to date in the hope that the opening 
left would be filled by Williams and his 
houses, against whom en» h have been op- 
position. 



HURTIG & SEAMON'S. 

The 125th street temple of mirth and 
melody is becoming a sort of headquarter! 
for breaking in performances and semi- 
dress rehearsals of new acts. This week 
there are four newcomers on the program, 
and another, Bobby CJaylor in "A Private 
Theatrical Agency," was to have been on 
the bill, but was forced to retire owing to 
a sudden illness. Al II. Weston and com- 
pany, in "Til* New Reporter"; Frank 
Mayne in a picturesque novelty called "The 
Sexton's Dream"; Friend and Downing, 
comedy team, and "Lo-Qua," a talking fig- 
ure, are under New Acts. 

The elimination of Bobby Gaylor gives 

Roland West undisputed position of the 

headline position. This is West's first op- 
portunity to play a week's engagement in 
Manhattan. Since his protean sketch "The 
Criminal"' was shown at the Yorkville 
Sunday concert he has smoothed it out con- 
siderably. Its defect is that the text does 
not stick to the plot, which has some strong 
dramatic values. Several characters are 
introduced for comedy effect. These catch 
solid laughs from the upper house and 
lighten the general character of the play- 
let, but delay the coming of the climax. 
Mr. West plays seven parts, the best of 
which are the old man, Prof. Scribs, and 
a newsboy. There has been newly added to 
the sketch a melodramatic struggle be- 
tween "Ready" Scribs, the murderer, and 
the police attendant, with green spotlight 
incidental, which is well worked. In an 
effective close West handles an opportunity 
for pathos excellently. 

Hill and Hill, a colored pair, opened the 
bill. They dress in excellent taste and 
the man does a good loose dance. The 
woman's chief responsibility seems to be 
the wearing of good clothes. 

Beatrice Kannier and Elsie CSaudier 
make up S showy sister team with a good 
deal of color in the costuming department. 
The girls do not sing too well, but their 
appearance is all that could be desired and 
they have an agreeable stage presence. 

Tom Moore is decidedly good as a coon 
shouter. Indeed, he is so good at this 
sort of singing that he should hold to it 
to the exclusion of his sc< ond song. Also 
he would perform a large public service by 
spreading about to hi-< fellow players the 
secret (»f wearing immaculate evening 
clothes as if iIk'.v belonged to him perma- 
nently. II is last number, involving an Im- 
personation of Ernest Hogan, won Moore 
several enthusiastic reca'Is. 

The Princess Chinquilla, if she is the real 
"Injun" princess the program would have 
us believe, is pretty much Anglicized. She 
has f*' w of the Indian race marks except 
the straight black hair, but with a pretty 
stage setting makes a picturesque figure. 
Her Indian war dance is a graceful per- 
formance. Ed Newell, billed as "The Cow- 
boy Juggler," did some fair work and 
helped out the picturesque effect. 



Horace Ooldin, the illusionist, is "lay- 
ing off" this week, the lirsl time in five 
years. 



Henry Frey will be featured by Al II. 
Woods in "Seerets of the police" next 
season. 






12 






VARIETY 



SUM M ER PARKS 



"FAIRYLAND," PATERSON, N.J. 

Melville & Sehultheiser, the amusement 
promoters, are drawing dividends on a 
novel policy at Fairyland, the summer park 
between Paterson and Passaic, N.J. They 
opened the resort last summer with the 
conviction that there was a field for a 
quiet amusement place, free from drink- 
ing and rowdyism, to which the better 
class of residents within trolley distance 
might bring their wives and children. 
There is no attempt made at Fairyland to 
outshine the big Coney Island resorts in 
lavish display of electrics, but the light- 
ing arrangement is adequate to its pur- 
pose. Economy has been used, but there 
is no indication of money having been 
stinted in the supplying of necessities. 

The plan of eliminating the bar conces- 
sion from the park appears to have justi- 
fied itself in box office returns, for at the 
opening of its second season observation 
would indicate that the profits for this 
year will be considerable. 

Fairyland has five acres in the 1 square 
inclosure, all the ground being occupied 
with concessions. Directly opposite the en- 
trance the middle space is given over to 
a circle swing. To the right stands the 
vaudeville theatre, holding eight or nine 
hundred, and giving a five-number bill 
twice a day. The admissions are ten and 
twenty cents, with the boxes fifty cents. 
Week of the 28th the cntertaiumu t in- 
cluded Gavin and Piatt, Mitchell and Mar- 
ron, Bell and Richards, Marie Leroy and 
ihe Pantzei Trio. Each performance runs 
one hour and fifteen minutes. Albert 
Brown Is the pianist. 

Behind the theatre a free open-air per- 
formance is given after each show. The 
entertainment has four numbers running 
fifteen to twenty minutes each. Last week 
Chester B. Johnstone, bicyclist ; Minting 
the Marvel, Paul Stevens and a trio of 
strong men appeared. Ample space is pro- 
vided about the stage for standing room 
and elevated seats are sold at small cost 
without obstructing the view of the crowd. 

A "figure eight" has the eastern end of 
the park, and the northeastern corner, now 
vacant by reason of the eviction of a gypsy 
camp, will be made into a pony track. 
The housed concessions, games, restaurant 
and booths are placed in a continuous 
line around the outside of the square, be- 
ginning with the Old Mill in the south- 
east corner to the shooting gallery on the 
north side. All the concessions appeared 
to be doing excellent business Sunday 
night, when an estimate might have placed 
the crowd roughly at from eight to ten 
thousand. 

Fairyland, the only "dry" park in the 
State, may be said to be unique and with- 
out opposition in it« chosen field. Its pa j 
tronage appears to be drawn largely from 
the better classes of Passaic and Paterson, 
with a sprinkling of Newark people. The 
rougher element from the mills seem to 
patronize the "wet" institutions exclu- 
sively. 

The general aspect of tho park loses 
something in daylight from the fact that 
only the main walk is paved, the central 
space being packed clay. The manage- 
ment explains this on the score of the 
clay flooring being much cooler and more 
comfortable for the standees watching the 
open-air show. *At night this defect in 
appearance is lost. 



All the rammer resorts along the Poto- 
mac River are now open. 



The park formerly known as Glen Echo 
at Washington will be renamed Dream- 
land, opening July 4 with full improve- 
ments. 



Luna Park at Washington is «aid to 
have become a society fad in the capita! 
and its success is assured. 



White City, Savin Kock, New Haven, 
Conn., had a very auspicious opening May 
30. New features have been added under 
the management of Speck & Darcy. 



Meriden, Conn., is to hold a centennial 
week, 11th. Elaborate features are 
planned, including a Midway. Thousands 
of visitors are expected and plans are be- 
ing made to entertain them. 



One man was killed and three_ others 
striously injured by the falling of a car 
from the "Loop-. he-Loop" at Athletic 
Park, New Orleans. Those men were ex- 
cursionists from the southwestern part of 
the State. 



Hippodrome Park, Branford, Conn. (L. 
W. Fisk, prop.), opened May 30 for 
one-day show, big crowds. Professor Bald- 
win's airship was on hand but failed to 
float above the earth. Kaces added inter- 
est to the events planned. 



Arrangements have been made for the 
formation of the Chester Park Opera 
Company, Cincinnati, which will give its 
initial performance Sunday, June 17. The 
opening attraction will be "The Rounders," 
to be followed by "The Belle of New 
York." 



Fairyland at Paterson, N. J., will have 
a balloon ascension day and night soon. 
An aeronaut named Ilillman will be in the 
basket. Hot air will be used and a fire- 
works display given in the evening. It is 
expected that this will be an attractive ad- 
vertisement. 



Rehearsal ■? began on Thursday for Bo- 
lossy Kiralfy's presentation of "Venice," 
which opens at South Beach on June 23. 
The spectacle will employ some three hun- 
dred people and the principals are practi- 
cally the same as when it was shown in St. 
Louis and Portland. 



According to Fred Thompson, of Thomp- 
son & Dundy, that firm will have its pro- 
jected summer park in Fort George ready 
for public opening by June 4 next year. 
The Hippodrome firm bought the ground 
not long ago for this purpose. The name 
of the amusement place will be Vanity 
<air. 



The place has an excellent atmosphere. 
The noise of the barkers has been re- 
duced to a minimum if not altogether 
eliminated, and the popular music played 
by Robinson's band of fifteen pieces, which 
will probably be made a permanent feature, 
reaches to every part of the inclosure. 
The effect of quiet, the orderliness and ex- 
cellent appearance of the crowd and just 
the right degree of gaiety gives to the place 
an almost ideal atmosphere. Rush. 



Arthur M. Hopkins, of the Ingersoll & 
Hopkins Co., will leave New York about 
July 16 for a tour of all the principal 
parks in the country, including, of course, 
those on the Ingersoll circuit. Note will 
be made of the general conditions and ap- 
pearances. The trip will take about a 
month. 



The State Fair will bo held at Shreve- 
port, La.. November 17 to 20, at the fair 
grounds about one mile from the city. The 
tf'He selected is ideal in every respect as 
to location, ease of access and other ad- 
vantages. It was formerly known as 
"Caddo Downs" and the property of the 
S'ireveport Country Club. It embraces 
about 100 acres. A commodious audi- 
torium will be built where concerts and 
other attractions will be held daily. 



Electric Park at Niagara Falls will be 
under the management of S. L. Robertson 
this summer. Mr. Robertson is acting for 
the S. L. Robertson Amusement Company. 
Many improvements will be made. Espe- 
cial attention will be given to illumina- 
tion. There is no limit to the possibilities, 
the power coming from the Falls cheapen- 
ing the expense considerably. Many curi- 
ous devices and emblems will be gotten 
up and the park electrically is expected to 
prove a standnid for brilliancy. 



Riverview Park, Chicago, larger and bet- 
ter than ever, is open. Bohumir Kryl 
and his music brigade, Rollins' wild 
animal arena, "The Jungle," with its 
Florida farm and reproduction of life in 
India, and the Igorrote Village are the 
most pretentious features, while other 
amusements will be furnished by Captain 
Soracho with his corps of sea divers, 
Hale's "Tours of the World," the German 
Hippodrome, with imported menage acts, 
and other lesser attractions of interest. 



Ravinia Park, Chicago, will have only 
high class musical attractions this sum- 
mer. Walter Damrosch opened the season 
June 3 with his symphony orchestra, and 
will furnish the afternoon and evening 
concerts. One of the features of this 
North Side resort is the attractive casino, 
which has been popular the last season 
as a rendezvous for automobile parties 
who spin along adequate roads and pic- 
turesque scenery of Sheridan Drive and 
Green Bay Road during the summer 
months. 



* 

All the Pittsburg parks are under full 
swing. "Dream City" opened Memorial 
Day to immense crowds and Ingersoll's 
Luna Park now has real opposition in the 
Smoky City. The new parks will attract 
amusement seekers in large numbers, al- 
though their locations will probably make 
for them an entirely new clientele. With 
three really large amusement parks and the 
lesser traction parks — Olympia, Kenny- 
wood, Oakwood, Southern and Calhoun — 
Pittsburgers should l>e able to pull through 
the summer. 

The new vaudeville theatre at Edgewood 
Park, Shamokin, Pa., opened Monday, 
May 28. When the structure is com- 
pleted it will be one of the prettiest 
and most up-to-date summer vaudeville 
houses in the State of Pennsylvania. It 
will have a seating capacity of between 
800 and 900. The park management has 
secured J. D. West, formerly with Frank 



Cobb's Comer 



JUNE 9. 11)00. 



No. 15. A Weekly Word With WILL th« Wordwright. 

CHICAGO.— "Rosebud" is another "Dolly 
Gray." 

LONDON.— I am lure "Rosebud" will be a 
greater hit than your "Good -Bye, Dolly Gray." 
—Hamilton Hill. 

And THEY certainly ought to KNOW. A 
march song is the song to sing in the parks, 
and "Rosebud" is one cracker- jack sailor 
march song. 

"ROSEBUD." 
Chorus. 
Good-bye, my Rosebud, my heart's bouquet, 
You will be sorry when my ship sails away; 
But if you miss me, little g.rl, don't cry, 
Call, and I'll come to you, Rosebud, good-bye. 

Free for a card or program, or if known to 

WILL D. COBB 

WORDWRIOHT 
48 W. 29TH STRE.KT 
NEW YORK CITY 

P. 8. — I have some swell numbers written 
for "business," for burlesque, and musical 
shows. — Will. 



Melville's booking agency, at Philadelphia, 
as manager of the new theatre. Some of 
the best vaudeville acts on the road will 
be booked bv Frank Melville, of New York 
city. 



Thomas .1. Cannon, formerly of St. 
l-ouis, has succeeded in organizing a com- 
pany for the building of a White City at 
New Orleans. The tract upon which the 
"White Citv"' will be built contains seven 

a* 

and a half acres on the Tebault tract ad- 
joining Metarie Cemetery. One of the at- 
tractions will Ik» an immense tower, wheie, 
seventy-five feet above the ground, will 
be a restaurant and higher still will be 
an observation garden. Among the con- 
cessions will be an aerial railway, skating 
rink, shoot-the-chutes and other attrac- 
tions. Mr. Cannon says the resort will 
be ready for business about April, 1907. 



The fire at the White City, Cleveland, 
on May 24 was a ruinous one. The flames 
broke out in the Old Mill, which was being 
repaired at the time, and held large quan- 
tities of tar. A lighted cigarette end is 
attributed as the cause of the flames, which 
by reason of the inflammable materials 
could not be cheeked. The loss is estimated 
at $150,000. There was $80,000 insurance 
on the building. The jtowcr house was de- 
stroyed at a loss of $30,000. The heaviest 
losera among the concessionaires were the 
Frank C. Bostock Animal Show, J. B. Mor- 
ris, Electrical Volcano Exhibition, Hall of 
Illusions, (Jates Amusement Co., Tsudi Oku 
Japanese Village, Chute the Chutes Co., 
Kntzenja miner Castle and Old Mill. Ar- 
rangements have l>cen made to rebuild and 
it is confidently expected the park will re- 
open on** July 4. 

The Spectacle Feast and Furies (H. M. 
Ziegler, nigr.) will give its first perform- 
ance in liexington, Ky. The season will 
consist of twenty weeks, already booked. 
The opening is a chorus and ballet of sixty 
danceTS from the Cirque d 'River, Paris. 
The dimensions of the stage are 350 x 250. 
In front a plaza with elevated stage will 
be erected and a circus ring constructed 
in the center. The background shows a 
modern scone with tall buildings, street 
cars, etc. The scene opens with a throng 
passing to and fro. Suddenly a commo- 
tion is seen in front of a saloon where an 
anarchistic meeting has lieen held. A fight 
ensues, the police are called and patrol 
wagons rush up. The fight develops into 
a riot and from a riot into the burning of 
the city. Several fire engines, patrol 



VARIETY 



13 



\\jig(,ns and gatling gun squads resist the 
attack of the mob. The final tableau will 
be entitled "Peace." More than five hun- 
dred people will take part. K. T. Ziegler, 
formerly with Robinson's circus, is "di- 
rector general" of the production. Harold 
Hushca, general manager. The chorus will 
be in charge of Alberti Hale, who directed 
the chorus for Kritzi Bcheff as ballet mas- 
ter. W. T. Sheehan, general stage di- 
m-tor. The following acts have been 
honked: lVkin Zouaves; Mile. Leris, 
equestrienne; Flying Ranvards; Tony 
liendo, acrobatic and knockabout clown; 
Mine. Helen (Jerard, equestrienne from 
London Hippodrome; OicioV Brooklyn 
Band; Edyth Riiymond, aerial artist; 
Missed Zara and Ootaw, toe dancers; 
Scheck Brothers' acrobats ; H. Van Cleve 
and his trick donkey; Sotto and St. Gar- 
dens, comedians ; Tnggart Family, acro- 
bats; Abdallal lien llamadie Troupe, 
Arabian acrobats; St. Anno and Croumer, 
equilibrist* and jugglers; Mack and Rel- 
gier, grotesques; Qmjnert, clown, and his 
elephant and girsffe; Imperial Troupe, ac- 
robats; Hounding Gordons, and Rose 
Went worth, equestrienne. 

A panic was averted at 'White City," 
Chicago, the opening day, when twelve 
j>ersons were injured on the new 
"roller coaster." While in a runway 
fifteen feet from the ground the bear- 
ings on one of the cars of the '"coaster" 
refused to work and the ear stopped on 
an upward incline and fell back. Other 
cars crashed into it and the panic- 
stricken occupants were badly bruised 
and tramped Upon in their frantic rush to 
safety. Otherwise the merry throng of 
50.0(H) which marked the auspicious open- 
ing of Chicago's greatest resort was the 
largest and broke all records in attend- 
ance, in spite of the cool weather which 
prevailed day and night. The new fea- 
tures introduced, together with the best 
of last year's attractions, are interesting. 
"Fighting the Flames" continues to be a 
novelty, and the "Chicago Fire" exhibition 
provel startling. Midget City entertains 
large attendance. Among last year's at- 
tractions are Jim Key, the equine wonder: 
while Killer's Blue Room entices a good 
portion of the amusement seekers. Hale's 
"Tours of the World." a new addition. 
The infant incubators is another of last 
season's interesting features, while the 
electric theatre, scenic railway, the chutes, 
figure eight, flying airships, Johnstown 
Flood, a Trip to Mars and many other side 
amusements please the great crowds. 
Innea and his band in the central plaza 
proved one of the strong features. 



At the London Coliseum the advent of 
three shows daily with one company is 
giving all hands hard work. The original 
idea here was alternating double companies 
doing four shows daily. This was cut to 
three shows with a second company doing 
the in between or "supper show." The 
next evolution was to cut out this second 
company doing the second show, and let 
the house-packing revue, "Puck's Port- 
folio," do three successive shows. The 
late financial crisis and shift of manage* 
inettt gave the desired opportunity, and 
now everything runs as merrily as Huher's 
Museum, only the work is harder. The 
revue here ran ISfi minutes on its first 
np|>earanee, and is still long enough. It 
is good that they have big restaurants in 
the building and can eat as they go along. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

ALBANY. N. T. 

PROtToK'S (Howard Graham, res. mgr). - 
Week of 4: Ed and Nettle Masse In a Juggling 
specialty, very clever; Lillian Header, a viollnlsic 
not btJTOOd the mediocre; May Yoke* and Uus Pix- 
ley In '•The Model Maid" were very good; Mel- 
ville Kills, pianist and singer, amused; Thomas 
O'Brien. Havel and Miss Etlie Lawrence In "Ticks 
ami Clicks," were excellent as mirth provokers; 
Willie Weston presented his imitations of noted 
acton in an excellent manner, and Ned Way- 
lturn's Ualn-Pears (under New Acts.) Motion 
pictures closed. MARTBL. 



ALTOONA, PA. 

LAKEMONT l'AHK THEATRE (L. T. Shannon, 
uigr. ).- Week 4 opened with local talent, Altoona 
Comic Concert Company (George B. Bender, mgr.). 
Hood business despite the rain. Stuart and La- 
vardo, tight wire performer on bicycle, scored. 
All the other attractions at park were in operation 

and report good crowds. '-THE PASTIME" 

MINIATLUE THEATHti (Silverman Bros., nigra.) 
Opened r«th with moving pictures and Illustrated 
songs. This house bids fair to prove a big sue- 
cess. C. G. C. 



ATLANTA, GA. 

CASINO (II. L. De Give, mgr.).— A satisfactory 
till was the verdict of a crowded house on the 
opening night. Week 4th: Lewis and Green, 
comedy i fair; The De Muth3, whirlwind dancers, 
hard workers and deserved their applause; Herald 
Square Quartet Shared honors with the headlluers; 
Marx and Herbert made Individual hits with tiieir 
comedy; billed as an added feature, Azra, Juggler, 
more than made food; The Military Odet had the 
large type and presented u spectacular act that 
went big; moving pictures completed the bill, but 

the lights were bad. STAR (J. B. Thompson, 

mgr.). An audience of good proportions saw the 
following bill presented week 4th: Lee Edmonds, 
1 lackface monologue, clever performer and a hit 
with audience; Acme Trio, comedy, fair, need new 
material: Grace Francis, songstress, fair; Martyne 
Sisteis, favorites here, clever; Jennie Delmar. illus- 
trated songs, good selection and fine voice; Frank- 
ford. I.aurl and Fraukford, sketch, received much 
applause; concluding with new pictures and a one- 
act comedy, "Hie Irish Daddies," by W. Z. Rog- 
ers and stock company. — NOTE. — In last week's 
review of the Casino bill mention was made that 
Idoletta (according to program) gave one of the 
best acrobatic turns seen here, when the credit 
was due to Blanche Sloan. l'.KIX. 



ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 

YolNGS TIER TIIEATUE (H. Myers, mgr.). 
— Bill week 4 included Rose De Haven and her 
sextet, line act and well received; Leo Carrlllo. 
mimic, fair; Gartelle Brothers, skating, fair; 
Decry and Francis, sketch, poor; Alvin Brothers, 
gymnasts, good; Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Barry, 
sketch, big laugh; Elite Musical Four, return en- 
gagement third time this season, strong hit, and 
Edison Klnetogtaph. Coming: The Great Brlnda- 
inonr and big bill. — —STEEPLECHASE PIER 
(Giles Clement, mgr.).- This house opens for the 
season week 4 entirely renovated. lames and 
Davis, talking act, good; Rose Malorine and Nora 
Thomas, dancers, clever act: Charles Howard, 

Hebrew Impersonator, big hit; Mr. and Mrs. Brown* 

Ing, sketch, very g<x*l ; Ed Mora, illustrated songs, 
fair; Koppe and Koppe. Jugglers, fair; Nelson and 
Arnold, sinking and dancing, goad-i American Vita- 
graph. — GUVERNATOR'S (Sid Fern, mgr.).— 
This theatre also opened for the season 4 with a 
big bill, including Monte Myro Troupe, pautomim- 
Ists. strong hit; Four Shannons, quartet, good; 
Robert check and Banm, Hebrew impersonators, 
very poor; Uice Family, musical act, good ; Starr 
Sisters, Ringers and dancers, fair; Buch Brothers, 
acrobatics, good; Kennedy and Wyble, singing and 
talking, fair: Three Jackson*, physical culture, 
fair; Hen Franklin and 'Poodles, singing, big lilt; 
Great Lynch, wire walker, good; Mrs. C. Iieslle 
Evans and company, sketch, good; Musical Mon- 
nrcka, good; The Everetts, comedy sketch, good; 
Mlrto and company, magicians. fair; Gard- 
ner and Golden, sketch, good. NOTES. — 

Doyle's Theatre has been rented as a first -class 
burlesque theatre to open shortly for the sum- 
mer. At Steel Pier Casino Murphy and Gibson's 
Minstrels continue to draw big crowds. 

S. WVCHTER. 



BALTIMORE, MD. 

GAYLTY (\V. L. Ballauf. mgr.).- Week 4: 
Good houses, Clark's "Runaway Girls" company. 
The performance open 1 * with a two-net "musical 
satire." named "The Sultan's Dilemma." which 
is more lengthy than the average one-act comedy. 
It was well received and has a charming chorus, 
pretty costumes and catchy music. One act Is 
given before and one act after the olio, which has 
only three numbers. Susie G Kxtwfn, vocalist, aver 
age; Bert vVlggin, comedian, cartoonist and jug- 
gler. \crv clever; The Bowery Hoys' Quartet 

scored li/nvily. ELECTRIC PARK (Schanbcr- 

ger & Irvln. mgrs. ) .--Week 4: Big business. 
Vaudeville at the big casino includes; Emma Cams 
in characterisation! has some now songs and made 
a decided hit; the three Weston Sisters in their 
musical act are pleasing and refined; Fields ami 
Wolb-y nrc seen In a Hebrew specialty which Is 
very poorly done; Brazil and Brazil, acrobats, have 
some novel features. The usual band concerts and 
dandng on the deck. O. J. WOLFF. 



BUFFALO. N. Y. 
SHEA'S (M. Shea. mgr. V- One of the liCSl 
I ills of the season to good business week of 4. 
John and Bertha Gleeson and Fred Houlihan, ex- 
cellent: .lines A. Kleman add company, very 
good; I! ay L. Boyen. very good. Should secure 
a new act; Hie present one having been seen here 
too often. Quaker City Quartet, excellent; Rob- 
ert Milliard and «• pauy, exceptionally good; 

Winona Winter, a magnetic and (lever little girl, 
scored heavily; Tony Wilson and the Three Am 



oroa Sisters, very good. Bill for week of 11: 
Claude G ill ing water and company, Ward and 
Curran, Eight Allisons, Rosa ire and Doreto, Find 
Isy and Burke. Bea Welsch, Charlotte Ravens 

croft and the Klnetogtaph LAFAYETTE (Chas. 

M. Bagg, mgr.). — The Lafayette Stock Company 
opened the summer season week of 4 to excel- 
lent business. The chorus Is very good, being 
composed of eighteen comely girls. The comedy 
parts are left in the bands of Bill Williams, Billy- 
Cook and John C. Hart. So far no opportunity has 
been offered them to show their ability. .leanette 
La Mont does well in the soubrette roles. Bea- 
trice llarlowe, an old stock favorite here, is the 
best of the women. To Teddy Aleene must be 
given the credit ot putting what little life there 
is In the burlesques. The olio: Beatrice llarlowe, 
good; Strickland and Dukesbury, Bee New Acts; 
the Marvelous Heumans, good. Week of 11: Sec- 
ond week of the stock company and the Musical 
Comedy Four, Williams and Aleene and Williams 

and ProctOf LINN'S MUSEUM (Dr. Hugh J. 

Linn. mgr.). — The Beauty Show drew crowds 
week of 4 and has been held over for another 
week. The bill In the theatre, with the excep- 
tion of La nnk' Watson, was very weak. Barker 
and Barker, fair; Al Norton, poor; Fannie Wat- 
son, the best woman artist ever seen at this house; 
lister Howard, poor. Bill for week of 11: The 
Sadlers, Bay Vaughn, I.ew F. Fullerton and the 

Vernon Sisters. ATHLETIC PARK (Robert 

MacBroom. gen. mgr.). — Business has fallen off 
considerably since the opening week, an indirect 
cause being there Is only one free attraction. Duss 
and his band drew crowds the first week, but now 
a local band with no drawing power Is the at- 
traction. The free acts for week of 11: The St. 
Behnoa and the Le Roys. Theatre (E. C. Par- 
ker, mgr.). — Good business week of 4. Three Rio 
Brothers, excellent; Short and Shorty, good; Tom 
Glllen, fairly good; Chas. I). Lawler and Daugh- 
ters, good singing, poor appearance; Tops and 
Topsy, good. Bill for week of 11: Gallagher 
and Hild, Wolff Brothers, Young and Brooks and 

the Lovttts. NOTES.— -Chas. W. McMahon, who 

resigned the position of manager of the Garden 
Theatre, so as to devote more of his time to his 
vaudeville agency and then later on accepted the 
management of the Temple Theatre, has finally 
decided to give his undivided time to the agency 
and has reopened his old office at 13ft E. Swan 
fctrect. CHIME. 



The Chas. K. Harris Courier 

Dnvted to th* xnttrtitt of Sings mnd Smgtrt. 

Address all communications to 

CHAS. K. HARRIS, 81 W. Slat St., N. T. 

(Meyer Cohan, Mgr.) 



Vol. 2. 



New York, June 0, 1000. 



No. 4. 



CAMDEN, N. J. 

WOOD LYNN i: PARK THEATRE (II. Bart Mc- 
llugh, mgr.).- This house opened May 20 to big 
business. Bill week of 4 Includes Loro and Payne, 
comedy acrobats, hit; Jack and Bertha Rich, danc- 
ing comedians, hit; Tanna. "the Odd Oriental," 
good; The Noles, German comedy duo, clever; 
Blanche Lawrence, petite comedienne, good; Reese 
I a? Itoy, musical novelties, well received. 

B. S. L. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 

MAJESTIC (C. E. Drai»er, mgr. for Kohl & 
Castle).— The hill Is headed by William Court- 
high and company In a protean sketch entitled 
"Under the Third Degree," having Its tlrst pres- 
entation here. The sketch Is dramatic In con- 
struction and the eight distinct and contrasted 
characters Mr. Courtlelgh playB are artistically 
finished and remarkably accurate. It proved the 
best offering of the season. Clayton. White and 
Mark* Stuart revived their familiar sketch, 
"Dickey," which Is crude In spots and saved from 
Itccnming tedious at times by the clever work. 
Welch, Mealey and Montrose, comedy acrobats, 
are reviewed under New Acts. George Austin 
Moore sang a number of popular songs and made 
a good impression. Marcarte Sisters gave their 
trapeze performance, seen here not long ago, and 
pleased. The Exposition Four, billed, did not 
appear. They were replaced by Madam Romano, 
an operatic soprano possessed of good voice. Her 
tlrst selections are too long and she spoils some 
of the best effects by standing in the glare of the 
calcium light. Conkey, as a club swinger, Is 
mediocre. His German dialect talk Is neither 
new nor entertaining. He should stick to his 
club Juggling and not attempt comedy. Jennings 
and Renfrew, blackface comedians, could have a 
good act with a fresh supply of Jokes, as they are 
fair comedians and capable of doing better. The 
parodies are made up of Jokes heard in vaudeville 
for several years. One of the team In a red vest 
is rather careless In Ills work. He ought to l»e 
more attentive to his partner, whose methods are 
good. Melville and Conway have a mixture of 
comedy, singing ind a poodle dog. The woman 
has an excellent voice. The male member In a 
clown makeup does a few Juggling tricks, but the 
comedy all through the act Is unfunny and needs 
rejuvenating to the core. Arthur Don and Minnie 
May Thompson In a sketch entitled "Enlisting 
Recrulta for Father" have a fairly good line of 
comedy, slnfflnir and dancing, but the bit of 
"melodrama" la so old and conventional that Its 
further use is valueless. The Black Veughnera 
are colored sinners and dancers. Their specialty 
not quite up to the average. Master Slater Is 
talented and with more training and experience 
will develop Into a tlrst rate comedian. His Jokes 
are delivered In a tame manner, while the sing- 
ing Is good. Dave and Fercle Martin and the 
Klnodrnme complete the bill. 

OLYMPIC tAU' Jacobs, mgr. for Kohl & 
Castle). — The bill for the week consists of the 
Kaufman Troupe, cyclists; Nora Bayes In songs 
■••ml Impersonations; Lizzie Evans and Harry Mills 
In "'Hie Old i/ove"; Stanley and Wilson In a 
German musical sketch; Musical Klelst, musical 
novelty; Madeline Wlnthrop nnd company In n 
sketch; Cilliuan and Perry, comedians; Brothers 
De Van. acrobats; Peter Baker. German comedian; 
Manning Trio, comedy sketch; Coyne Brothers, 
comedian; Mr. and Mrs. Jack and Sisfers Cole 
man. 

TROCADKRO fl. M. Welngarden. mgr .). The 
first week of stock burlesque st this house. ojM'ii- 
imr the regular summer season, drew large audi- 
• nets. The show opens with an olio In which 
I lie l»est number Is credited to Nello, a Juggler, 
Whose act Is novel and skillful and one of the 
tK'st of Its kind In vaudeville. J. W. Sherry. 
billed as a inonologlst, occupied the stage for 



Miss Mabel Hudson, the 
well-k u o w n soprano 
vocalist, will intro- 
duce the new song, 
"Somewhere," with 
tremendous success. 
She says it is the best 
ballad she has sung 
in years and gives her 
a great opportunity to 
display her voice to 
great advantage. She 
also makes a feature 
of "Dreaming, Love, 
of You." and "Just 
One Word of Consola- 
tion." 

Miss Jeannette Dupree 
writes from Boston 
that she has set the 
town singing "Mother, 
Pin a Rose on Me," 
ami wants credit for 
making this song 
popular there. She no 
doubt deserves this 
credit in conjunction 
with Billy Clifford, 
who also sang It In 
Boston with great suc- 
cess. 

Miss Dorothy Dean, late 
of "The Yankee Con- 
sul Company," is fea- 
t u r 1 n g "Sister," 
"Mother's Got the 
Habit Now" and 
"Somewhere." 

Professionals who are 



now playing In or near 
New York can hear 
"Somewhere" played 
at all the prominent 
cafes and restaurants 
in town. One has 
only to hear some of 
these orchestrss play 
this song with the 
beautiful 'cello obll- 
gato to realise what 
this means to them 
when tbey wsnt to 
use It as a song. It 
can be heard at Shan- 
ley's, Rector's, 
O h u r c h 1 1 l's, The 
Metro pole, Marlbor- 

ough, Murray's, The 
Breslln, The Grand, 
The Imperial and the 
New Belmont, etc. 
Any of these orches- 
tras will gladly play 
It on request. 
Mill Nella Bergen, who 
Is about to re-enter 
vaudeville, has 
"Somewhere" In prep- 
aration and will also 
make a feature of the 
song which she Intro- 
duced, entitled 
"Dreaming, Love, of 
You." As It la just 
suited to her voice, 
she cannot find any- 
thing better suited to 
the vaudeville audi- 
ences. 



five minutes, during which he made a few 
stereotyped comments on the "ladles" in the au- 
dience and sang one parody that failed to receive 
an encore. Rowland Travers Introduced a magical 
exhibition containing nothing that has been over- 
looked by other magicians, the box trick being the 
best. The burlesque Is called "Peasants' Msrket 
Street," a concoction of Weber and Fields' former 
pieces, with elalioiately costumed chorus of pretty 
girls and excellent musical ensembles, to which 
end Manager Welngarden has been most loyal. 
'Hie company Is headed by Nat Fields, who 
through his connection with summer stock com- 
panies here for the past three seasons hss es- 
tablished himself In favor. Nat Jerome Is a 
Hebrew comedian. His dialect is of the ex- 
aggerated burlesque type, bordering on the un- 
couth Btyle of expression and boisterous In man- 
ner. He should tone down his methods. Ed 
Morris as an Irishman Is a good comedian snd it 
Is not necessary for him to disguise his fsce 
with a lot of grease paint in order to be funny. 
Leo Kendal, German comedian, Is fairly good in 
a small part. May Curtis Is prepossessing, but 
her singing is too quiet for burlesque. Edith 
Shaw and Nellie Fcutoii lead a few ensemble num- 
bers and play their parts In the best way they 
know how. Connie Ward, a chorus girl, made a 
hit In a Japanese number. The burlesque us a 
Whole, notwithstanding the fact that very little 
time was given over to rehearsals, pleased im- 
mensely. 

MD J. EPSON'S (Bid. J. Euson. mgr.).— The 
summer Season Is In evidence at this theatre and 
the company Installed for the sultry weeks has 
been augmented by the addition of Ruth Everett 
and several others. The curtain raiser, "Good 
Old Summer Time," Is staged In the usual style, 
with a number of musical offerings. In the olio 
are Whitehead and Guerson, Drown and Harhead, 
Orville and Frank and Toby and Lloyd. 

FOLLY (Empire Theatre Company manage 
meat).- The 'innocent Belles," with a company 
Including Imhof. Suzanne Corinuc and John A. 
West, Is the offering, closing the regular season 
of bnrlesipie at this house. 

WHITE CITY (Paul D. House, mgr.).— The st- 
tendance at this resort has so far been the largest 
in the history of summer amusements In Chicago. 
The numerous attractions In inclosed buildings 
are reaping their harvest after months of prepa- 
ration, and If the weather continues to favor 
thev will break all previous records In receipts. 
Jewell's Manikins and the "lire Show" entertain 
large throngs, while Midget City, Kellar's Blue 
Boom. Chicago Fire, the coasters and other 
features receive their share of liberal patronage. 
'Hie vaudeville theatre, under the direction of 
the Western Vaudeville Association ami managed 
by Kerry C. Meagher. Is usually crowded at every 
performance. The bill for this week consists of 
Tyler and James. Kalncratus, the Fays, the ereat 

Howard and the Klnodrome. The Bands Rossa 
furnishes the musical program and Is one of the 
leading outdoor attractions. 

sws ROUC1 park (Leonard Wolf, mgr.).— 

Willi favorable weather conditions this popular 
amusement park enjoys good attendance and offers 
the public real summer novelties In Its enclosure 
of natural lawns, trees and beautiful surround- 
ings. Resides the new scenic railway, which has 
been Installed during the week, there Is a giant 
balloon which ascends to the top of a steel dome 
and which circles around the structure, giving 
the participants a view of the Illuminated park, 
Which Is brilliant and gay In manifold colors 
of thousands of Incandescent lkhts. Ye Old Inn, 
Midget City, Katzenjamnier Castle and all the 
other attractions are largely attended.' The 
vaudeville theatre, owned by Kohl * Castle and 
under the management of Kerry C. Meagher, offers 
the sain.- class or acts as the downtown theatre 
and draws capacity audiences at every perform- 
ance The bill this week Includes Clark and 
Dutwan. Anna Moore. Bazar and Lazar, the 



14 



• 



VARIETY 









Songs That Win on Their Merits 



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Professional 
Department 



HARRY JONES 
THOS. KELLY 
JOE McNATTI 



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FRANCIS, DAY ft HUNTER 

15 WEST 30th STREET, NEW YORK 



!<i 



Rosa Ires, and Chas. Harris, band concert! are 
glTen by the Banda Roma. 

RIVERVIKW PARK (Wui. M. Johnson, mgr.).— 
Since the opening of this entirely rebuilt and 
rejuvenated park s. -veral uew featurea bare been 
added, among tbein a large circle awing and elec- 
tric Infant incubators, wbere a number of babies 
lire nouriHbed and |.r.->« rvt-.l by artificial de* 
vicea and scientific methods. The Igorrote Vil- 
lage, wlili ita natives, and tbe abow known as 
"Tbe Jungle," wbere Rollins' trained animals 
give exhibition*, arc among tbe best attraction*. 
Kryl and hia band are popular and luimen^ 
crowds congregate about tbe pavilion to listen to 
tbe excellent musical numbers. 

CHUTES — Tbe Randa ItaJlana Abruzzl is the 
chief attraction, althongh tbe varloua features 
scattered about tbe park are enjoyable and well 
patronised. In the theatre a vaudeville pro- 
gram is offered and the following artiata appear: 
Jessie Bellgard, Ix>n lieland, Tony Regan, Joe 
Nelmeyer. 

COLISEUM.— Well and his baud and Maude 
Rockwell In vocal selections furnish a pleasant 
and enjoyable evening. Tbe music is of tbe 
|h, pular kind and appeals to the large crowds 
that fill the Coliseum comfortably. 

BISMARCK GARDEN.— This North Side ren- 
dezvous for lovers of good music opens Saturduy, 
the principal feature being Innes and his band, 
who moved over from White City. Among tbe 
aoloists are Herman Bellstedt, a (Jerman cornetlst. 
and Vacloy Jlskra. The (warden has been en- 
larged and Improved since last year. 

NOTI38. — "Beemer, Campbell and two Juggling 
girls" Is the name of a new club Juggling act 
which is appearing at the vaudeville theatres in 
the West. Max Milllan, who was quite 111 re- 
cently, has fully recovered and will shortly re- 
turn to vaudeville. The Eldorado Trio, who made 
their first aperiarance In vaudeville In a singing 
and instrumental musical act at Frankfort, Ind., 
this week, were Itooked for the summer and next 
season over a circuit of Western and Eastern 
theatres. J. J. M unlock nnd Frank Buck, of the 
Western Vaudeville Association, are itooklng for 
the first time this summer attractions for car- 
nivals and fulrs in the middle West. A ma- 
jority of the smaller theatres booked by the asso- 
ciation will be open throughout the summer, and 
according to advices received here this week 
vaudeville is proving the t»est kind of entertain- 
ment In the West. A new vaudeville theatre, to 
be known as tbe Crystal, is now l»elng built at 
Madison. Wis., and will Ik* liooked by the Western 
Vaudeville Association when It opens for tbe sea- 
son In August. A committee of city officials made 
a rigid tour of Inspection of all the amusement 
devices at White City, Sans SoucI and other 
parks, to ascertain tbe safety of the buildings In 
case of fire or panic. Since the accident on the 
scenic railway on the opening day at White City 
the management has taken precautionary measures 
to prevent a repetition of accidents, particularly 
In structures where there are no outlets besides 
the regular entrances. The Interstate Circuit bus 
acquired the ttooklng for Oak Summit Park In 
Eviinsvllle, Ind., for the summer. 

FRANK WIESBERG. 



CINCINNATI. 0. 

ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS (Walter M. Draper, 
secy. ).— The attraction this week Is Conway's 
Ithaca Band, which holds over another week. 
Special programs have feted arranged. The popu- 
lar airs were enthusiastically received by the 
general crowd, while the artistic, music-loving 
audiences applauded the heavier numbers. This 
week's soloists are A. IV Stengler, clarionet; 
Cnrdelle Simons, tromlsme; Ross Mlilhouse, cor- 
net; William Pfaiinkuchcn, bassoon; J. E. Box- 
hclmer. flute, nnd ft K. Tlchenor. snxaphnne. 
Conway will continue to June 15, when he will 

he followed by Innes' Band. CHESTER 

PARK (I. M. Martin, mgr.).— An evenly balanced 
performance is given In tbe vaudeville theatre 
this week. Original Bootblack Quartet, consist- 
ing of EH Broulllette, first tenor; Arthur Clayton, 
second tenor; Charles Wel»er, baritone, and Max 
Hayes, bass, was the headllner and made good. 
The singing was excellent but tbe comedy poor. 
Herr Hon a made his first Cincinnati appearance 
and gave a finished performance. His living 
portrait of the late President McKlnley was 
very clever. Mr. and M'rs. Milo Vagge, bag 
punchers nnd boop rollers, presented a turn far 



above the average. Hatch Brothers, eccentric 
musical artists, "freaked" a singing act, while 
their execution on the musical Instruments was 
excellent— Edward GlUen failed to appear. Next 
week: Savan and McBrlen, Cook and Stevens, 
Pero and Wilson, with Mile. Luba de Sarema's 
animal act as a epeclal added attraction.-—— 
LAGOON (E. E. Clark, mgr.).— The bill presented 
this week Is fully up to the standard of regular 
winter performances. Innes and Ryan, who are 
the headllner, made a big hit; Seeker, Wilkes 
and company, Zulu comedians, do a singing and 
dauclng turn that Is very good; Marie Clark In 
illustrated songs is good; Three Highlands, mu- 
sical artists, scored heavily, Master Highland's 
I .a ton swinging bringing applause; Pepper Twins 

do some clever dancing. CONEY ISLAND 

(Brooks & Anderson, mgrs.). — The snow this 
week contalna Edwin J. Camp, Hebrew comedian, 
who scored the biggest hit of the season at thla 
resort; Cartmell and Reed, comedians, pleased; 
Stelnert and Thomas, musical act, passable; 
Mami Vesta Telia, singer, made a hit; LaFayette 
I-amont Troupe, of acrobats did some clever 
stunts. As a special attraction George Brum 
hnugh made several successful flights. 

H. HESS. 



syndicates have been viewing the beach here and 
it Is rumored that a "Coney Island" will be built, 
taking up a three-mile strip of tbe beach. 

B. S. L 



DES MOINES, IA. 
EMPIRE (M. J. Karger, mgr.).— Week 4: Mr. 
and Mrs. Cal. Stewart, good; Verdon, Perry and 
Weber, singers and dancers, good; Frances Swartx 
and company, presenting "The End." clever team; 
Win. Gross was well received; Hlbbert and War- 
ren. Eva Thacher and moving pictures. 1NGER- 

SOLL PARK (Fred Buchanan, mgr.).— Week 4: 
Paplnta. excellent: Adair and Brown, novelty act; 
Iioulse Brehany, singer; The Powells, illusionists. 
Cole Brothers, comedy acrobats, and Haveraan's 
Animals held over from last week. Fine perform- 
ance to excellent business. IOWANA PARK 

(W. R. Oonrley. mgr.).— Week 4: Royal Opera 
Company in "Two Vagabonds." Good performance 

and business. UNDER CANVAS. — Wallace 

Shows', 4: great favorite in Des Moines. One of 
tbe finest street parades ever seen here and Wal- 
la** can honestly advertise "highest class circus 
on earth." Excellent business. Gentry Bros.' 
Dog nnd Pony Show comes 8-8. 

H. V. REAVER. 



EABTON, PA. 
ISLAND PARK (D. B. SeGuine, mgr.).— Bill 
week 4: The Sylvesters In a comedy aketcli. "Mike 
Murpbv's Mistake." well received; The Great 
Richards, "male soubrette." the man with the 
diamond dress, hearty applause; "Friends but 
Rivals," by Douglas and Shady, well received: 
The Three Dilks, comedy musical specialists, made 
good; Ed Morton, coon shouter. compelled to re- 
spond several times; Mile. Dana, serpentine dancer 
with electrical effects, good. Pictures closed. 

MAC. 



ELKHART, IND. 
CRYSTAL (Jack Bentham. res. mgr.).— Week 4: 
Moore and Russell, fair; Charles Hasty, the 
Hoosier Boy. waa a former resident of Elkhart 
nnd went strong; Blanche Freeman, illustrated 
song, bit: Rice and Walters, moderately success- 
ful. Coining 11: The Lynns. Burk and Urllne. Ed 

Poulter and Blanche Freeman. BUCKLEN 

(Fred S. Tlmmlns, mgr.).— Week 4: Fisher and 
Johnson, fair; Maude Le Page ,**moderately suc- 
cessful; The McCarvers. bit; J. C Post and dog. 

mod; Marie Harris, illustrated song. UNDER 

CANVAS.— John Robinson's Circus drew large 
crowds. Coming week 18: The J. Frank Hatch 

Shows. NOTE.— HI Henry, the proprietor of 

Hi Henry's Minstrels, Is spending his summer 
months at Elkhart, the guest of C. G. Come. He 
states he will start bis troupe from here August 1. 



ERIE, PA. 
WALDAMEER PARK THEATRE.— Vaudeville 
began at this house week 4. Bill Included Edward 
and Rolla White In a clever athletic act; Sadie 
Hart, songs and stories; Youngs and Brooks, fair 
musical team; Frank Burk, equilibrist, and the 

Frnzer Trio in a dancing act. NOTES.— Four 

Mile Creek is open for the summer. The Kilties 
Band gave concerts at Waldameer Park afternoon 
and evening 6-8. J. Frank Hatch Carnival Com- 
pany appeared here 4-9. Ringllng Brothers' Circus 
is heavily billed for 9. L. T. BERLINER. 



EVANSVILLE, IND. 
OAK SUMMIT (Edwin F. Galllgan, mgr.).— 
This park opened 3d to big business. Ben Turpln, 
comedy acrobat, took well. Swor Brothers made a 
hit with their blackface comedy. Wlllard Newell 
and Miss Belle Harrington were fairly successful in 
their comedy sketch, "Last Night." Lena Daven- 
port, popular songs. Pero and Wilson, pantomim- 
es, good. COOK'S PARK (Harry Laurance. 

mgr.).~Martynee in impersonations and mirror 
dances was the feature for week 3. Well re- 
ceived. Edith Williams pleased with her songs. 
Fernando and May, musical act. fairly good. 
(Moss Brothers have a good act in their poses. 
Charles Hawison, whistler, fair. The open-air at- 
traction is Dare-Devil Doherty in his looping the 

gap with bicycle. NOTES.— Harry Wright 

opened bis Exposition Shows here 4. Some of the 
attractions are Plantation show, Coliseum, elec- 
tric theatre. San Francisco Earthquake and others. 
The Elks have secured "Feasts and Furies" for 
week 18. A big time Is promised. 

ROBERT L. ODELL. 



GLOUCESTER CITY, N. J. 
EMPIRE (Jas. E. O'Brien, mgr.).— Week of 4: 
Bill includes Carey and Cotter, the "Race Track' 
Sports," big hit; Lillian Steele, singer and dancer, 
bit; Tom Grimes, eccentric comedian, good; Flor- 
ence Sunnls. petite comedienne, good; Billy Bow- 
ers and company In "Hasklns' Dog," hit; Benja- 
min Iielgb, monologue, good, and the Empire Stock 

In "The Reception." NOTES.— The Brighton. 

Lyceum and Inlet theatres have closed for the sea- 
son. The Empire remains open all summer. 
Washington Park on tbe Delaware continues to do 
a record-breaking business. Several New York 



GLOVERSVILLE, V. Y. 

FAMILY (Fred De Bondy, res. mgr.).— Week 3: 
Mark Sullivan and Willie Dcaves In "Hotel Ask- 
ller." melange of nonsense, kept the audience In- 
terested; Minerva Coverdale, singing comedienne, 
dainty and pretty; Jean Beaugere, Impersonator 
and lightning changes, good; Ira Ressner, Illus- 
trated songs, underscored his big hit of last sum- 
mer; Four American Trumpeters, best musical 
act that has been seen here. 

AISLE-SEAT FIEND. 



HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 

NEW SUNNY SOUTH FLOATING PALACE (W. 
R. Markle, mgr.). — June 4 and 5: BUI opens with 
one-act farce 'A Sure Cure for Jealousy" with 
five characters. The acting of Randolph, Valdare, 
Hague and Misses Herbert and Hoffman brought 
forth cm Minimis laughter. Specialties were: Ethel 
Davenport, fair; four Faust Sisters, good; Master 
Jlmmle Dell, big hit; two Dell Sisters, fair; tbe 
Two Randolphs, fair; Hague and Herbert, big hit. 

LYONS. 



JAMESTOWN, N. Y. 

CBLORON THEATRE (J. J. Waters, mgr.).— 
Week 4. excellent bill. Estelle Wordette and 
company In "A Honeymoon in the Cat ski lis," good 
sketch; Hill and Sllvalny, unicycllsts, clever; tbe 
Faust Family, acrobats, much applause; Charlotte 
Ravencroft, good; Tanner and Gilbert, eccentric 
comedy tarn, and Herbert, a European conjurer, 
mystified. Business fair. NOTES.— Ethel Des- 
mond Stock Company holds the theatre at Irvine 
dal Park, Warren, Pa. The Kilties played there 
9th. L. T. BERLINER. 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 

FOREST PARK (Lloyd Brown, mgr.).— Week 3 
witnessed no diminution in tbe crowds visiting 
this popular resort. Royal Hungarian Band, open- 
ing its second week, is especially strong in brass 
and makes hit when playing marches. Peter 
Schwartz is liked in bis cornet solos. The Johns- 
town Flood is the best patronized concession. At 
Hopkins Theatre tbe vaudeville bill was especially 
pleasing. It includes the Rossow Midgets; Tessle 
Marshall, a Kansas City girl, who sings; Ethel 
Whltesldes and her "picks"; Martyne and Wilson, 
young women singers; Bander I-avelle Trio, trick 

bicyclists, and Anna Franklin, cornet solo. 

ELECTRIC PARK.— Ellery's Band still continues 
to please the crowds. Reckless Russell made his 
100- foot bicycle dive. Tills is the free attraction. 
In the German Village the audience gave a warm 
welcome to Maude Rockwell, soprano, who ap- 
peared there last year. The MeCall Trio gave 
songs and eccentric dances. Miss Margaret Mc- 
Bride appeared In a singing specialty; the Hawes 



Sisters in singing and dancing. 



FAIRPLAY. 



XEWANEE, ILL. 

BIJOU (M. Newman, mgr.).— Week 4: McKln- 
non and Reed, comedians, hit; Irene Temple, sing- 
er and dancer, fair; Hamilton and Wiley, fair. 

NOTE.— On 10 the new amusement resort to be 
known as Windmont Park, under tbe management 
of Mr. Newman, will begin its summer season. 

C. A. COLEMAN. 

LEAVENWORTH, KAN. 

PEOPLE'S (Chas. Cunningham, mgr.).— Week 
of 3. good bill. Frank A. Voerg. Dutch comedy 
musician, does a clever turn and pleases audi- 
ence. Toble Stark. Juvenile artist, dances pret- 
tily and captures the audience; big drawing card. 
Hanvey and Doane, sketch, make an unsuccessful 
attempt to bring out the applause. 'Ilie Wernts 
are excellent trapeze performers and make a big 
bit; a strong feature. C. E. Haslet, illustrated 
song, takes much applause. The Peoplescope. 

LEE J. LOGAN. 

L0GAN8P0RT, IND. 

CRYSTAL (Tom Hardle, res. mgr.).— Ashton 
and Earle, sketch artists; Colburn and Francis, 
sketch artists, fair; Phil Conner, songs, good; 
I/ewis and Harr, negro Impersonators, artistic; 

Klnodrome. Good business. DOWL1NO (J. E. 

iKiwilng, mgr.). — Harry Howard, nomologist: 
Lester and Moure, comedy acrobatic act, well 
liked; Le Dent, Juggler, clever: moving pictures. 

Fair business. NOTES.— Whiteside Vaudevill? 

Company under canvas opened to capacity 4th. 
Wabash Valley Traction Company will build a 
new summer pavilion at Spencer Park. John H. 
Amnions announces that he Is going to form a 
circuit of popular-priced dramatic houses In con 
Junction with his Crystal Theatres. 

RBVILO. 



LOUISVILLE, XY. 

FONTAINE FERRY PARK (William Reichman. 
mgr.). — Week of 27: The headlinera are William 
Rock, Alma Youllan and the Eight Lotus Girls. 
This is a new act. The Eight Lotns Girls is an 
abstract from a comic- opera. Mr. Rock has been 
seen here In "The Tenderfoot" and "The Mayor 
of Tokio." He Is a Louisville boy. He does some 
eccentric dancing which is better than his singing. 
Miss Youllan, who has been seen here before In 
"Coming Thro* the Rye," sings several numbers 
assisted by the chorus. There Is not much to the 
act. Fredo and Dare have a new comedy act In 
which they Introduce some first-class musical spe- 
cialties and have some good comedy. They should 
l»e classed among the headllners. Henderson hnd 
Roos appear here for first time. They have a 
one-person act. The male member did some good 
comedy work on the tight rope. The woman in 
the act Is made up as a soubrette. She docs 
nothing but a little talking. Wynne Wlnslow has 
been heard here several times. She sang some 
fair songs. The Wilson Brothers famish German 



JUST FULL « IDEAS 

A small room In the big house 

Remick's, 45 W. 28th St. 

ED. ROSE writes 

ACTS 

FOR. RELIABLE PEOPLE 



LOOK HT" Parodies— 4 Absolute 
Knockouts on the Very Latest 
Hits. 



comedy. Both have good voices. This German act 
is above the ordinary. They responded to several 
encores. The Polyscope closed the performance 

with some good views. NOTES. — Erllnger's 

Band is the musical attraction for the free con- 
cert. Miss Beatrice Fisher, a Chicago girl, la the 
soloist for the band. 

CHARLES SYLVESTER. 



LYNN, MASS. 

AUDITORIUM (Harry Katr.es, mgr.).— The clos- 
ing bill of the season not aa strong a one as usual. 
The Empire City Quartet as the headllner scored 
heavily ; Gardner and Stoddard, a close second, a 
hit; Bush and Gordon, acrobats, fair; McConnell 
Sisters, fairly well liked; Laura Bennet and com- 
pany, poor; Pierce and Opp. fair. Marie Walsh 
was replaced by Josephine Davis, who waa well 

liked. NOTE.— The Auditorium closes a very 

successful season this week. It has been S. R. 0. 
nearly all year. It opens again August 27. 

DAVE CHASE. 



MONTREAL, CAN. 

DOMINION PARK.— This park opened for Its 
first day June 2 with a great crowd. Its star 
a tract Ion la I Miss and bis band for two weeks. 
The Nohrens and the Wizard Brothers and other 

good attractions are also there. RIVERSIDE 

PARK (Al E. Read, mgr.) opened to big business 
the 3d. The feature Is Burton and his dogs. 
'Hie vaudeville department has four other good 

acts. SOHMER PARK (Lavlgne & Lajole. 

mgrs.). — The week opened up a good bill, tbe 
Colonial Septet leading. It Is one of the best 
heavy musical acts. Lavigne's band concerts con- 
tinue a feature also. Morellos Brothers, acrobats, 
took well. The Milraan Trio on the wire proved 
popular. Chic, cyclist, made a big hit, as did 
Madame Gertrude, soprano. Attendance, 5.000. 

THE ROYAL (H. C. Egerton. mgr.).— Cliff 

Grant's "Bowery Girls" closes this theatre for 

season to-night. NOTES.— Burlington, Vt., is 

holding a Merchants' Carnival with many attrac- 
tions. AL. M. PRENTISS. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

POLI'S (J. II. Docking, mgr.).— Closing week 4: 
Dan Burke and Schoolgirls, dancing a big feature; 
Eva Westcott and company in "An Episode of 
Modern Life," pronounced hit; Mareena, Nevaro 
and M.ircinii, ordinary acrobatic act; Whistling 
Tom Brown, fair; Klein and Clifton, eccentric 
dancers (under New Acts); Lillian Shaw, vocal 
dialect comedienne, was pleasing. Poll's closes 
June after a successful season. W. J. F. 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

ATHLETIC PARK (Archie Cox, mgr.).— Week 
4: Clayton, Jenkins ami Jaspar with their "Dark- 
town Circus" gained favor with the children. 
The Maglnleya offer a clever aerial act. With 
a special "set." proper accessories and a bit of 
pruning Casey and LeClalr could be topping bills 
in the better bouses. Miss Beeson, of Ferguson 
and Beeson, should stop "kidding" in billing her- 
self as the world's champion soft-shoe dancer. 
Pictures closed. Business Is fair. The loop-the- 

loop at this park has been condemned. WEST 

END PARK (Thoa, S. Winston, mgr.).— An ex- 
cellent bill prevails for week 3. Lopez and Lopez 
are fair musicians, with a wealth of electrical 
effects. Count DeButz and Brother scored with 
their well-known bicycle act. Mr. and Mrs. Wa- 
terous with a new batch of songs and Llndstrom 
and Anderson in acrobatics are held over. Pic- 
tures closed. Business Is excellent. Bill 10th in- 
cludes Fredericks Family, Lavlne and Leonard, 
IiOpez and I-opez, and Count DeButz and 

Brother. NOTES. — Vaudeville will give way to 

comic opera at Athletic Park 24th, the occasion 
being the debut of the Maud Daniels Opera Com- 
pany. A wrestling bout between Koto I lunula and 
Charles Olson took place at the Greenwall 
Theatre 4th. The Aquarama at Audubon Park 
has ceased to be a moneymaker and will lie torn 
down. O. M. SAMUELS. 



NOTES FROM BUFFALO BILL'S SHOW. 

Trieste, Austria, May 15. 

After nine weeks in Italy the Buffalo Bill's Wild 
West entered Austria at Trieste, where three days' 
record-breaking business was dene. 

The nine weeks In Italy were simply "Immense" 
and a truthful report of the success flnsnclally and 
otherwise would hardly be believed, yet It is safe 
to say that it will be hard for any show In 1906 
to duplicate In nine successive weeks the business 
done by Colonel Cody's Rough Riders. 

The Italian season was finished with a matinee 
at Udlne, and it looked as If the entire population 
of tbe northeastern corner of Italy had come to 



VARIETY 



15 



VAUDEVILLE AGENTS 



WILLIAM MORRIS 

1440 BROADWAY, Corner 40th St., NEW YORK 

Telephone 053* ©54, OSS Bryant. Cable A* dreaa. Willnsorrla. 

CHICAGO OFFICES 167 Dearborn Street 



SPECIAL ATTENTION WIL L BE GIVEN TO SUM MER PARKS AND FAIRS 

Booking for the Representative Vaudeville Theatres of America 

Booking Exclusively the Following leading Vaudeville Houses i 



P. O. Williams' Colonial. 
P. G. Williams' Orpheum. 
P. G. Williams' Alhambra. 
P. O. Williams' Orpheum, Boston. 
P. O. Williams' Novelty. B'klyn. 
P. G. Williams' Gotham, B'klyn. 
P. G. William** Bergen Beach. 
Henry Myers' Doric, Yonkers. 
Henry Myers' Atlantic City. 
Henry Myers' Doric, Camden. 
Keeney's, Brooklyn. 
Bijou, Beloit, Wis. 
Godfrey's, Grand Rapids. Mich. 
Green's Op. Hue., Cedar Rap's, Mich. 
West Side, Janesville, Wis. 
Morrison's, Rockaway. 
Del m ling's, Rockaway. 
International, Chicago. 
Hippodrome, Cleveland. 
Mannlun'a Park, St. Louis. 
Cedar Point, Sandusky. 



Hammersteln's Victoria. 
Hammerstein's Roof Garden. 
Hammersteln's, Philadelphia. 
Sheedy's, FaU River. 
Sheedy's, Newport. 
Hatha way's, New Bedford. 
Hathaway's, Lowell. 
Hathaway's, Brockton. 
Bijou Theatre, Omaha, Neb. 
Bijou, Lincoln, Neb. 
Gennett's, Richmond, Ind. 
Grand Op. Use., Decatur, 111. 
New Savoy, Hamilton, Ont. 
Electric Park, Toledo. 
Electric Park, Detroit. 
Electric Park, Cleveland. 
Electric Park, Baltimore. 
Athletic Park, New Orleans. 
Olympia Park, Newark, O. 



Wllmer and Vincent, Utlca. 
Wilmer and Vincent, Reading. 
Wllmer and Vincent, Allentown. 
Weber and Rush, Bingham ton. 
Weber and Rush, Schenectady. 
H. H. Lamkln's, Toledo. 
H. H. Lamkln's, Dayton. 
Katxea' Auditorium, Linn. 
I. C. Mishler, Altoona, Pa. 
I. C. Mishler, Johnstown, Pa. 
Manhattan Beach, Denver. 
Cook's Park, Evansvllle. 
Forest Park, Little Rock. Ark. 
Brltannia-on the-Bay , Ottawa, Ont. 
Chester Park, Cincinnati. 
Woolworth's Rf.Gdn.Lancaster.Pa. 



PASTOR'S 

UTH ST., 3D AVE. CONTINUOUS. 20 ft 30 CTS. 

NEXT WEEK, MONDAY, JUNE 11. 

AL. H. WESTON ft 00. 

Mr. and Mrs. Browning, Garlette Bros., 

Bucb Bros., £ tltO n Du0 '„ m. ,* 

.,„„_.,,„ - rvaim/— MSS Barrett ft Co., 

Arlington ft Delmore, v^^^ & Bmlth , 

Murray, Clay ton 4 Drew, The B entons, 

Grace Ohllders, O'Rourke ft Gillian, 

Harry Holman, The Vitagraph. 

PROCTOR'S 

BEST SHOWS IN TOWN 



West Side Park, Muncle, Ind. 

N. D. It le Important that artists send their open time to 
both the New York and Ghlcag-o Offices 



Tel. 14*7 Bryant. Cable, "Control," Haw York. 

The Agents' Agency 

CLIFFORD C. FISCHER 

1440 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 
HOLLAND BUILDING. 



B. BUTLER BOYLE. 



MATH IAS R. TUFTS. 



THE BOYLE AGENCY 

INTERNATIONAL 
VAUDEVILLE AND DRAMATIC 

81 Weat 81st Street, HEW YORK. 

Cable Address, "Butleboyl," New York. 
Tel. 4075. Md. Sq. 

IDA CARLE 

Vaudeville Agent, St. Jamea Building. 

Tel. 0064 Madison. 

ln$ersoll& Hopkins Co. 

lltt BROADWAY, V. Y. CITY. 

Amusement Park Agents 

Nsw York Representative 
Howard Athenaeum, Boston, Mass. 

AL. MAYER 

Vaudeville Agent 

Room MS, St. James Building 
B'way and 88th Street, Bow York. 
Tel. 8847 Madison. 



Tel., 4067 Madiaon 
B. A 



Cable, Myersba 
E. 8. 



MYERS -KELLER 

General Vaudeville Agents 

31 West 31st Street, New York 

•Phone, 2032 Madiaon 

REICH, 

PLUNKETT 
* WESLEY 

ST. JAMES BUILDING 



BORNHAUPT i M c 7„\ M * T,0 "* L 

St Jamea Bldg. Tel. 4664 Mad. Sq., New York. 

CHAS. ESCHERT 

with Al Sutherland. 8t. Jamea Building. 
Booking only good acta. 

If AD II All Theatrical Syndicate, Theatrical 
IVHr nHfl * Vaudeville Manager* 

1286 and 1881 Broadway, New York. 

Anything There's a Dollar In 

JAGK L*EVY 

140 West 42d 8t. Mew York 

H. B. MARINELL1 



NEW YORK PARIS 

Cable, Cable. 

"Helferslch" "Uptodate Paris" 



LONDON 

Cable. 
"Bravissimo— London" 



HOLLAND BUILDING. 1440 BROADWAY. 
TELEPHONE: 8084 BRYANT. 



FRANK MELVILLE 

KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING 

SUMMER AMUSEMENTS S5 

CONSTRUCTION AND THEATRICAL 
ATTRACTIONS 



Pitrot&Girard 

InternstionaJ Vsudevillo Agsnti. 
1263 Broadway, New York 



Tel.. 4*18 Mad 



W.J.PIimmer 

Exclusive booking agent for all attractions play- 
ing the Empire Circuit. Address Knickerbocker 
Theatre Building Annex, Rooms 720 to 787. 



see us. We had up every seat and every foot of 
canvas and could accommodate 13.00O yet were 
'unable to find room for the crowds. 

At dinner Colonel Cody called the "boys" at 
table to attention and addressed them as follows: 

"I know you will agree with me when I say 
that It will be hard for us to part from Italy. 
Her snow-capped Alps, beautiful valleys, blue 



skies and almost perpetual sunshine remind mo 
forcefully of our beloved Big Horn Basin in 
Wyoming under the shadows of our snow-capped 
Rockies, and the Basin should be called the Italy 
of America. We still have others to hear from, 
as we go to six more countries before we return 
to our beloved home, but they will have to get a 
lively move on to beat Italy." 



23 d 



ST. 

Mate. Dally, 
18, 88. 

Phone 1028 
Chelsea. 



All-Btar Vaudeville. 
HENRY LEE, B-LE CU8I0N8-5. 
| Smith A Campbell, Leaky, Rolfe 
| Quintet, etc. Nights, 15, 25, 
I 33. 50, 73. 



VHAMMEHSTXIN S TIEATIE 
ICTORIA vaaSs™, 

Next Week ^SStiSL. JUNE 1 1 

Prices, 25c. 60c. 76c * 81 00. Mat. Every Day. aft A 80c 

Inauguration of Ninth Annual Season. 

Every Evening at 8. 

HAMMERBTEIN'S PARADISE ROOF GARDEN 

And Victoria Theatre of Varieties. 

New Featurea Weakly. 

Return for a Limited Engagement of 

THE. MARVELOUS 



1255? 

Mate. Dally, 
All Seats. 
IB. SB. 

Phone 1840 
Harlem. 



"THE FIRST VIOLIN." 

Misses Morgan, Deshon, Scott. 
Mr. McAllister, Cnmmlngs. 
Star Vaudeville. Nights, IB, 
25, 85, 50, 75. 



GlGLER 

Tailor 



6 West 29th Street 
NEW YORK 



ALVIENE'S 




Vaudeville School of Acting 

AMD 

Institute of Stage Dancing 



^Grand Opera House Building 
23rd St. and Eighth Ave. 
New York City 

Largest and moat suooeaaful 
school of the kind is New York. 

New acta rehearsed and whipped into shape. 
Vaudeville acts, dances, sketches, etc., taught 
1,000 successful pupils now on the stage. Bend 
for illustrated booklet. 



Subscribe now 

and bo sure of 

VARIETY 



Every man In the Wild West enjoyed to the 
fullest extent the tour of Italy and honestly re- 
gretted the necessity for quitting the country. 
Our season began early and will close late, as we 
do not expect to finish Europe before November 
next. 

Colonel Cody Is In the best of health and spirits 
and his shooting from horseback is as good this 
seaHon as ever in his life. 

Every member is In fine fettle and the best of 
humor prevails. All will be glad to get home 
next fall, but you couldn't get a man to quit now 
and miss this season's travels, experiences, sights, 
etc. 

The Colonel has been made the object of much 
personal attention from distinguished people In 
Italy. The King prevented him with a handsome 
gold cigarette case bearing the royal monogram 
and crest in over 300 diamonds. The Duke of 
Genoa (uncle of the King) gave him n chronome- 
ter watch with the ducal crest and monogram in 
diamonds and rubies. Many other handsome and 
valuable souvenirs hsve been presented and the 
Colonel will hnve a beautiful display when he re- 
turns to the States. FRANK A. SMALL. 



PAWTTJCKET, R. I. 

NEW PAWTUCKKT (J. W. Capron, mgr.).— 
Week 4 big houses the rule. Orsce Fitzgerald, 
ballads, took well; Kennedy and James, singing 
snd dancing act, pleased; The Meehans, singing 



FAYS 



JOHN T. and EVA 
(ADEPTS MYSTIC). 

ABIE MITCHEL L 
And Her 85 Tennessee Students. 

RICE AND PREVOST 
"Bumpty Bumps." 

CLIFF BERZAO'S COMEDY CIRCUS. 

THE FOUR BARD BROTHERS, 
Marvelous Acrobats. 

COLLINS AND HART. 
Parody Acrobats. 

GREEN AND WERNER, 
Singers and Dancers. 

CAMILLE TRIO, 
Comedy Bar Act. 

LALA SELBINI, 
The Bathing Ulrl. 

LU TONO FU, 
The Only Chinese Baritone in the World. 




6REATER N. Y. CIRCUIT 




Alex. Steiner 

us* 

VAUDEVILLE A9ENT 

BeekiBC PereigB nasi H stive Act*. 



ST. JA1 



and danelng. good; Killeen and Murphy, Irish 
comedians, well liked, as they are local favorites; 
I.a Belle's picture songs took well this week; 
Webster's motion pictures were very good; the 
afterpiece by Killeen, Murphy and company was 

very funny. KEITH'S (C. E. Lovenberg. 

mgr.). — Good crowds are visiting every day at 
Keith's to see the motion pictures and hear Matt 
Bennic sing the songs. NICK. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

KEITH'S (II. T. Jordan, mgr.).— Summer 
weather patrons bad no reason to complain of 
the bill offered thla week, although nearly all 
the big number acts were repeaters. Rose 
Cnghlan again presented her admirable playlet 
"The Ace of Trumps," in which she was given 
excellent support by Edward T. Emery. This 
little play, like Miss Coghlan, wears well snd 
wa» accorded a deserved recognition. Wlllsrd 
Slmms made his first appearance In thla house in 
a musical offering called "Things I Have Seen 
on the Stage." Slmms appeared in this city be- 
fore In a similar act several years ago, but he 
has added one or two new featurea to It which 
bring It up to date arid he scored a lilt. Edith 
Conrad assisted Slmms Hnd her vocal efforts were 
almost as t»ad as some of the burlesque she at- 
tempted. W. C. ("Whlte.v") Fields, the Juggler 
who recently closed a season with Melntyre and 
Heath's "Ham Tree," was warmly welcomed In 



Amusement Booking Association "«> 



JOHN F. McORAIL, President and General Manager. 

CHAS. E. ELLI8, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Vaudeville, Dramatic, ^V^vr, 

724.728 Chicsfo Opera House Block, CHICAGO, U.S. A. 



16 



VARIETY 





Write, wire or telephone 3812 GRAMERCY. 



Late Feature Films and Song Slides 
Also Machines With or Without 
Operators Lowest Rates 

HARSTN A PP.. 138 Emat 14th Street. Mew York 



HARRY PILCER 



WITH 



Max S. Witt's " Six Sophomores and a Freshman " 

PROCTOR'S 23d STREET, WEEK JUNE I I 

LONDON "MUSIC HALL" 

Uht Great English Vaudeville Taper <W**KJy) 

401 STRAND. W. C. 

American Represent* tire — Miss Ida M. Carle, Room 706, St. Tames Building, where a 
file of papers can be seen and advertisement* will he recti Ted 



AMERICANS COMING TO LONDON SHOULD ADVERTISE IN THE 

Theatrical s Sports Review 

The office will always welcome Americans. 

OATLEY A CRAWLEY, Proprietors. BERT A. DORMAN, Editor. 

Offices, 51 Green Street, Leicester Square, London, Eng. 




WE CARRY THE 
LARGEST AMD MOST 
VARIED STOCK OF 
DICE IV THE WORLD. 

Try our new TRANS- 
PARENT, INVISIBLE 
SHAPES, use as many 
as you wish, let Player 
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PRICE PER PAIR, 
91.60. 

BICYCLE PAPER, $9 per do*., best on earth; 
Block Out Ink also, for lino work, per hot., 
$1.60; CHICAGO SET SPINDLE, $20; Roulette 
Wheels complete, 1,000 Harris checks, 9186; 
Check Cop, the Poker Players' best friend, 93; 
Harris Inlaid Checks, any design, per M, 922. 
Send for our new cut-price catalogue. Free. 
JUST OCT. 

H. C. EVANS & CO. 

1X6 Clark St., Chicago. 



Princess Chinquilla 
and Newell 

PER ADD. JAMAICA, L. I. 

Week June 4th, Hurtig A Beamon's. 

First time in Hew York since Australian tour. 



IA/ALTER 



McPherson 



You Need Me in 

Management JACK LEVY, MO W. 42d Si* 




The Child 

Theatrical Trunk Works 

212 EAST 9TH STREET, NEW YORK. 
Send for Catalogue F. 

REHEARSALS 

/* Beat Place In New York /* 

(iOSSWEILER'S 

CAFE AND ASSEMBLY ROOM 

350 FIRST AVENUE. NEW YORK 

Bet. 20th k 21st sin. Telephone, MB7 Qramercy 

RENT, LEASE OR SALE 

BON TON 
Family Theatre 

Also store adjoining, 80 feet by 100 deep. 

Write J. O. JEMOH, LYCEUM THEATRE, 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

D ancing H owards 

ARTISTIC SINGING and DANCING EXPERTS 

July 8th— J. K. Burke's Circuit of Parks. 
Have some time open in June. 

William Gould 



AND 



Valeska Suratt 



Address Eccentric Club, London, W. C, until Sep- 
tember 1st. 
Cable address, "Reichplunk." 



bis natlre town. Fields has assumed a stvle 
which places him st the head of bis class and he 
bandies the most difficult tricks with such ease 
ss to make them seem simple. Charlie Case, 
another big favorite, repeated former successes. 
He still talks about "Father" and "Brother 
Hank" in a way which pleases Immensely. Al 
Carlton got a good start by working in comments 
about his skeleton-like form, but be kept It up 
until it became tiresome and be did not seem 
to hare enough material to work a change. A 
foreign musical act given by Ferrero, who as- 
sumes a clown makeup and Inflicts all sorts of 
unharmonlous sounds from several showy Instru- 
ments which are very unmusical. Not until he 
introduces a dog which plays on bells and chimes 
does be reach anything that Is deserving of even 
minute praise. The audience applanded the dog. 
The World's Comedy Four have one good song 
and more that are not so good. None of the 
comedy for whleh they are given credit on the 
program was discernible. Arthur, Mildred and 
Stella Boylan gave their sketch "Jack and 0111," 
which met with favor, the children doing some 
acceptable work. John snd Mae Burk, In a mu- 
sical offering; McNamee, a clay modeller; Lanrle 
Ordway, an English character singer; Viola and 
Engel In "Bumps and Bangs" and the Ten Jl 
Troupe of Japanese magicians made up the bal- 
ance of the bill, with the pictures as usual. 

BIJOU (O. Dawson, mgr.).— The Bijou Stock 
Burlesque Company organ Its summer season with 
good business and a pleasing show. Margaret 
Baxter. Edna Davenport, Glenroy Brothers, Eddie 
Armstrong and the Zarrow Trio appeared In the 
olio and filled the principal roles in "A Scotch 
nighhall" and "A Busy Night." 

TROCADERO (Fred Wlllson. mgr.).— The fctock 
company presented "Cafe Delinonlco" and "Fun 
In a Doctor's Shop" In which Billy Hart was en- 
trusted with the principal roles. Anna Frances, 
Billy Hart and Emma Weston, Hughes and na*l»- 
ton. nnd the Brothers Rlva appeared In the olio. 

LYCEUM (J. O. Jerraon. mgr.).— Burlesque 
stork furnished the week's entertainment here, 
with John Conley, the Cain Sisters and others In 
the bill. 



NOTES.— While on a visit this week looking 
over sites for the erection of a theatre for grand 
opera productions Oscar Hammeretcin stated 
that be might also select a site for a theatre and 
roof garden wherein vaudeville would be intro- 
duced. The vaudeville idea, however, seemed to 
be engulfed In bis enthusiasm over the prospects 
which seemed to favor grand opera in the Quaker 
City. The Ca«ino bad a second week of "Darkest 
South" announced, but the bouse was closed for 
the season. KINKS. 



PITTSBURG, PA, 

THE GRAND (Harry Davis, mgr.).— Grace 
Caiutron is as attractive and clever as ever. 
The soprano waits song exploiting her high 
register and a Juvenile song are fairly good, but 
she Is best of all In the "Dolly Dimples" number. 
Gub Edwards' "School Boys and -Girls" are the 
real things. There are two real and heartily ap- 
preciated travesty teams on the bill — Fred Ray 
and company in a Shakespearean burletta and 
Geo. n. Carr and Marjorle Jordan, who close 
their singing and comedy act, "A Dip Into Vaude- 
ville," with a burlesque. Dan Sherman and 
Mabel De Forest create roars of laughter with 
"The Fall of Poor Arthur." Patty Brothers 
offer a head-to-head balancing act that makes 
the audience sit up. Irving Jones sings a new 
song and several old ones. Willie and Edith 
Hart, do good work in a refined dancing and 
singing act. Allen and Dalton, comedy musicians, 
sprung a few new features. Mile. Latlna, the 
physical culture girl, performs a number of diffi- 
cult feats. Palfrey and Hoeffcr do some good 
ncrobatlc cycling work. Lawrence and Harring- 
ton in their comedy skit "Installments" pleased, 
as did William La Belle in his specialty.. Man- 
nger Davis Is now offering his own moving pic- 
tures of local Incidents, and making a bit there- 
by. The week's offering shows views of the 
Decoration Day ball game and the Knights 
Templar parade. NOTES. — Harry Davis an- 
nounces the names of some of the leading mem- 
bers of the organization which Is to take Its 
place as part of the continuous vaudeville at the 
Grand on June 2." for the balance of the summer. 
Charles Abbe will play comedy roles and Marlon 
Ballon Ingenue parts. Minna Fhilllps and George 
Probert will also return. Oscar Eagle has been 
loaned by Llebler & Co. for stage director snd 
will also play parts. The plays to be given have 
not yet been chosen, but they will be short and 



for the most part comedy, so that they will fit 
In. 

The main attraction at Dream City Park this 
week is a monster two-ring hippodrome circus. In 
addition to the arenic sets Ferdinand Gattl with 
his Philadelphia band and Slgnor De Luca, the 
boy cornet 1st. have been re-engaged. It Is also 
proposed to give monster firework exhibitions every 
Wednesday evening. Manager Cunningham admits 
this is "going some" in the way of park programs 
and if he continues justified in giving such mass- 
ive attractions they will be continued all season. 
"Dream City," designed by W. F. Hamilton and 
brought to a successful opening nnder the manage- 
ment of W. C. Cunningham, has received much 
favorable comment. It comes mighty near being a 
suburban park with Its trees, grass and running 
brooks. The vaudeville season at Kenny wood, 
Oakwood and Southern parks opened Monday. The 
advocates of a Greater Pittsburg are holding meet- 
ings every night at Luna Park. Ten-minute 
speeehes are made from the band stands. Weber's 
Band with Miss Blanche Muheffy as soloist and 
the Semols Teceuhe Troupe of flying Arabs are 
among the attractions Luna offers this week. 
Rocereto and his band are at West View Park 
this week. MADAME PITT. 



PORTSMOUTH, 0. 

ORPHEUM (Jas. Bahln, mgr.).— The bill for 
present week la only fair; business good. The 
feature is the Lafayette Lyric Singing Comedy 
Four, singers of merit; Carrlngton in his novelty 
act Is very tame; Mitchell and Browning, sketch 
team, don't please; Guy Stone, singer of Illus- 
trated songs, sings no better; moving pictures 

pood. CASINO, Mlllbrook Park (Fred F. Hlg- 

ley, mgr.). — The first week of the Casino was 
very successful. A farce, "A Bachelor's Honey- 
moon." was very pleasing. Homer Barton as 
the bachelor and Miss Alma Chester as the actress 
are excellent players. "Charley's Aunt" Is th<» 

bill for the present week. NICKELODEON 

(Chas. Welch, mgr.). — Brltt and Nelson fight 
pictures, the attraction, drew large crowds. Wal- 
ter Paterson sings the Illustrated songs well. 

NOTES. — Decoration Day was a great opening 
day at Mlllbrook Park. Blaine Dnrnold. of the 
Lyceum Comedy Company, has been visiting 
friends and left for the East for a summer vaca- 
tion. Ben Evans, the whirlwind dancer, has 
closed with John W. Vogel's minstrels and Is 
home for the summer. 

ROY McELHANEY. 



Wanted 

For Miss Lillian Ingersoll's 
Production, "The Hand," 

Two Good Legitimate 
Actors 

with good appearance. 

Write lowest terms. If possible send 
photo in eveoiog dress. 

JEAN BEDINI 

Manager for Miss Ingersoll 

Jans Uth. Ksith's Theatre, Cleveland 
une 18th. Shea's ParK Theatre. Buffalo. N.Y. 

VAUDEVILLE HEAOLINERS 

-GOOD STANDARD ACIS 

If you have, aa odd epea week yon want to 111 at 
short notio* write to W. L. D0CK8TADER, 

Oarriok Theatre, Wilmington, Dot 
Can close Saturday night and make any city east 

of Chicago to open Monday night. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

OP HIOH CLASS VAUDEV1LLB THEATRES 

M MEYERTELD, JR.. Pros. 

MARTIN BECK, General Manager. 
FRANK VINCENT. N. Y. R*pr***ntativ*. 
All Application* for Time Moot bo Addressoi to 
a ■• EBAY, Bootleg Manager. 
Majmtle Tfceer** Bid* . fjkdoaee. Ill 



ARTISTS DESIRING TIME 

Pleas* Write) to 
GEORGE MANAGER 

HOMANS SOUTHERN 

St. James PARKS 

Building Amus*n 

N. Ta Co. 



>aat 



SAGINAW, MICH. 

JEFFERS' (Sam S. Marks, mgr.).— May 27 to 
June 2: Estella Ferry and company In repertoire. 
(ictt Phillips and J. A. Tray nor, Hebrew come- 
dians, made a hit with their act. "Two Wise 
Jews." Coming, June I and 4: Frank Maples and 
W. J. Patron Stock Company. CASINO, River- 
side Park Theatre (W. L. Richardson, mgr.).— 
Week 3: "Broomstick Witches," the Frankly n 
Whitman. Cora Landls and B. C. Whitney pony 
ballet; Eekert and Berg, presenting "The Master 
and the Pupil"; Barr and Evans, comedy noveltv; 

Harry Kdson and dog. VAPDETTE (F. E. 

Button, mgr.). — Continuous vaudeville. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

The Greater Novelty and National theatres, 
under canvas, opened Monday evening to packed 
houses. At the first show at the Natlonol there 
were 2,400 people and nearly as many at the other 
place. 'Hie tents are only two blocks apart and 

the crowds go from one place to the other. 

NATIONAL (Sid Grauman, mgr.).— Howell and 
Edwards, Carless, Musical Spraguello*. Weston 
and Hathaway, Ward Sisters, Anderson Children, 
Reouble Sims and pictures. GREATER NOV- 
ELTY (Tony Lutelskl, mgr.).— Gllroy, Haynes 
and Montgomery, Burke Bros., Mabel Howard, Al 

Hasaard, Musical Bentley and pictures. NOTES. 

— There will 'be several more tent shows opening 
up within the next few weeks. Sam Davis, a 
supervisor, Is to be the manager of one on Van 
Ness and McAllister streets.— ORPHEUM (John 
Morrlsey, mgr.). — Elisabeth Murray. Bailey, Aus- 
tin and company, Clifford and Burke, Evn Mndge, 
Valerie Bergere and company. Mother, Houghton 
and MosbST, Catherine Dahl, Carson and Wlllard 
and pictures. B. D. C. 



ST. PAUL, MINN. 

STAR (J. C. Van Roo, mgr.). — House closed for 

the season. NOTES. — Wonderland playing to an 

enormous crowd. Dlavolo In loop the loop was 
star attraction for week of May 27. All of the 
attractions doing splendid business. WILD- 
WOOD (H. M. Barnet. mgr.).— This resort Is to 
open Its doors to the public on June 9. "Fighting 
the Flames" and miniature railroad chief attrac- 
tions. B. T. ROBERTSON. 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE (C. H. Tlummer. 
mgr.). — A weak bill was offered this week. St. 
John and Le Fevre, dancing, was fair. Harry 
Atkinson, imitator, failed to please. Frank and 
Jen Latona, well liked. Ward and Currtn In "The 



VARIETY 



17 



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WILLIAMS' IDEALS and IMPERIALS 

FIFTY CHORUS GIRLS; GOOD SINGERS AND DANCERS 

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P. S. Mr. J < 



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contain 15 catchy and beautiful colored de- 
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wyyywyyyyyyyyyyyyyywyyyyyk <wyyyyyyyyywyyyyyy^^^yyyyyyyywwy» 



' 



VARIETY 

KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 

CARDS OF ARTISTS 

UNDER THE HEADING OP 

"REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS" 



1-2 Inoh slnoU oolumn, 

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Terrible Judge," fanny and well received. The 
Chamberlains, rope throwers, fair. Brown and 
Nevarro made an impression. Zazell-Vernon 

Troupe, pleased. NOTES. — "White City" 

opened on May 30. Attendance, 40,000. Very 
gratifying to the management, as the park is not 
yet complete. SAM FREEMAN. 



TRENTON, N. J. 

LAKESIDE THEATRE, Spring Lake Park.— 
The second bill week of June 4 is a good one. 
even better than the opening week; playing to 
good business. Marie Le Roy, singing comedienne, 
does well; Jones and Sutten, colored singers and 
dancers, proved entertaining; Nat Gill, ventrilo- 
qulat, was good; Corbley and Burke, comedy 
sketch team, and Ben Morse, acrobatic cyclist, 
all good. Garvin, Piatt and Peaches In a one-act 
farce, "The Stolen Kid," best of bill and took 

well. Electric Theatre has as chief attraction 

"The Great Train Robbery" and is doing good 



business. The second week of the parks shows an 
improvement. H. B. W. 



TROY, N. Y. 
AL-TRO PARK.— Large crowds of pleasure seek- 
ers enjoyed themselves thoroughly on the figure 
eight, coaster, the helter-skelter and the other 

amusements. NOTES.— The Barnum A Bailey 

show visited this city June 6, which was the occa- 
sion for the turning out of one of the largest 
crowds seen here. Pawnee Bill's Wild West 
Shows exhibit here to-day. J. J. M. 



WICHITA, KAN. 

WONDERLAND PARK THEATRE (Jno. C. 
Nut tie. mgr.). — Wight man. the clay moulder and 
cartoonist, opened show and was well received; 
Jerry, the frog man, gave a clever performance; 
Wells and Sells, comedy acrobats, made good, and 
Dlerlcks Brothers, European jugglers, were the 
hit of the show. Klnetoscope closed show. 



BIJOU AIR DOME (E. G. Olson, mgr.).— Funny 
Dutch Walton opened the show and wus a hit; 
Devon Sisters, singers and dancers, well received; 
Tnrral Spencer sang Illustrated song; Aliern and 
Baxter, comedy acrobats, good; Bijougraph closed 
show. A. C. RACE. 



WORCESTER, MA8S. 

LINCOLN PARK THEATRE (Sanford Wallln. 
mgr.). — The bill week of 4 includes: The White 
City Quartet, good; Larex, the aerialist, good; 
Cooper and Robinson, a colored team, made a hit; 
Joe Flyn told some funny stories; good pictures. 
Darling's dogs and ponies are the free attraction 

this week. WHITE CITY (H. II. Blgelow, 

mgr.).— Will Hill, high wire artNt, excellent; 
Lester Brothers, acrobats, good; Mile. De Lorn. 
contortionist, very good. "Darkness and Dawn" 

opened last week to good business. 1'INE- 

HURST PARK (J. F. Donovan, mgr.).— Charles 
and Jack Ahearn, bicyclists, good; Lambert and 



Pierre, blackface act, entertaining: Andy MeLeod 
l<as a good monologue; Marlon and Dean in a 
Singing and dancing act were well received, as 

were Moran and Marky, comedians. UNDER 

CANVAS.— Cummins' Wild West won here the Oth 
and did good business. Frank L. Robinson's Cir- 
cus will Ik* with us the Oth. NOTE.— George 
Pearee, the character actor, has taken the merry- 
go round at Plnehurst nnd reports good "bis." 

BARLOW L. STICKLE. 



YORK, PA. 

HIGHLAND PARR.— The New-borough Opera 
Company In "Tbe Mikado" la playing to poor 
houses week 4. I lie entire company Is composed 
of home talent. UNDER CANVAS.— T-owery 
Bros.' Vaudeville Circus, 4 and r». drew crowded 
houses and pleased.'— --NOTE. — Manager Won. B. 
I'yle or The Parlor has returned and la busy get- 
ting things In shape for his opening. 

JACK DIAMOND. 









18 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



■ 






SIM 



\AJ 






COLLINS 



AND 



HART 



CARRYING THE ONLY CAY MUSICIAN IN THE WORLD 

THIRD SEASON ON HAMMERSTEIN'S ROOF GARDEN 










GBNUINB HIT 1M VAUDEVILLE 



The Sexton 



9 




Dream 



SCORE* AT HURT IB & SE ANION'S WEEK OF JUNE 4TH 

MANAGEMENT. LOUIS WESLEY. REICH, PLUNKETT A WESLEY, 8T. JAMES BUILDING. 






Henry Clive <& 

William Gould 

Present 

Management LOUIS WESLEY 




V>he Mysterious 
Chinese Automaton 

THE ACME Or ILLUSORY 
CREATION, TREMENDOUS 



REICH, PLUNKETT & WESLEY, ST. JAMES BUILDING. 



Andy Lewis Laura Ordway 



PAST SEASON LEADING FEATURE BAM DEYERE'S OWN COMPANY. 
P. 8.— YES, MAUDE ELLIOTT RETURNS TO THE FOLD. 



ENGLI8H CHARACTER COMEDIENNE. 
Week of Jane 11th— Keith's Union Square. 



THREE MITCHELLS 

Vaudeville Favorites 

FAREWELL AMERICAN APPEARANCE. 
EUROPE, 1007. 



MISS 

CHARLOTTE PARRY 

PRESENTS HER COMPLIMENTS 

and respectfully requests all who might possibly be 

interested to read the following: 

•IP 

PORTLAND EVENING EXPRESS, TUESDAY, JUNE 6, 1000. 



THE PORTLAND THEATRE. 

If there wasn't another number on the bill this 
«H'k at the Portland bnt the superlatively clever 
art by Miss Charlotte Parry and company, there 
would . t not, nor there could not, be a possible 
• hance for a "kick" by the patrons of the popu- 
lar vaudeville bouse. Not but what the rest of 
ttie bill is food, for It is, exceedingly so, and 
from start to finish an all-star course is offered 
by the management. Speaking of Miss Parry's 
work, it la simply phenomenal, and her changes 
are all of the lightning character, from grave to 
K«y, from mirth to pathoa, and always true to 
life. Her support is worthy of the "star" and It 



<. 



is not too much to aay that "The Comstock Mys- 
tery" la about the cleverest one-act sketch ever 
presented at the Portland. Miss Parry assumes 
seven distinct characters, each of them perfection 
In Itself, and all without time for "make-up." 
Mr. Frank A. Trenor, an actor of considerable 
ability, assists her and he does so admirably. Aa 
the detective In the case be acta the part with a 
quiet dignity that is moat pleasing. It la a very 
cleverly arranged playlet, affording ample oppor- 
tunities for the display of ability by both caat 
and star and that the audience appreciated their 
efforts waa aplendidly attested in the warmth of 
the reception at Its close. 



Camille Trio 



Playing Return Dates Everywhere 



Hammeritein'i Roof Now , — 
Orpheum and Williams' Circuits to follow 



3 CONSTANTINE SISTERS 

HAMMERSTEIN'S PARADISE ROOF GARDEN 
Kind —rmtomlon of UEMLER A OO. 



VARIETY 



19 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



THE EXPOSITION FOUR 



THE GREATEST 
EXPONENTS OF 
ARTISTIC NOVELTIES 



MUSICIANS EX 
ITS 



XENCt 
RI! 



3 ALEXANDERS AND BRADY 
PROTEAN ARTISTS WITH AN ELABORATE DISPLAY 



May 27— Ramon* Park, Grand Rap- 
id*, Mich. 
June S — Majestic Theatre, Chicago. 



VOCALISTS Or POWER 
DANCERS OF EXCEL 

7 SENSATIONAL SURPRISES 

$1,000 WORTH OF THE CELEBRATED J. W. YORK & SONS 9 (GRAND RAPIDS) INSTRUMENTS 



The Irish American Trio 

PRESENTING THEIR ONE ACT COMEDY 

"MY SON TOMMY" 

Away from all other*. Open for Vaudeville, Faroe Comedy or Burlesque. 
Addreea JOE J. MACKIE, HUNT'S HOTEL, CHICAGO. 



CHERIDAH SIMPSON 

XV VAUDEVILLE. 
SOS W. STtb St.. New York. 



BELL and HENRY 

"THE 8LEEPY MAM," 
Will shortly arrive In America. 



HAUE YOUR CARD IN VARIETY 



BEAU IDEALS OF VAUDEVILLE 



JOHN 



EMILY 



DELMORE & DARRELL 



BOOKED SOLID FOR THE 8UMMER. 



NOW BOOKING FOR NEXT SEASON. 



Melville Ellis 



ORIGINAL PIANOLOOUE. 



Chas. 





& CO. 



Season off 9 06 and '07 Complete 



Address Princess Theatre 
New York City 



HARRY 



IDA 



SALMON <& CHESTER 



The Australian Entertainers In their London Coeter art. 



Week June 11—0. 0. H., Pittsburg. 






JUNE. 4. HAMMERSTEIN'S ROOF 



WM. MORRIS, Agent 



Time all filled 



SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT! 

Rice and Cady 

Bobby North 

Edward F. Gallagher 



(OF GALLAGHER * BARRETT) 

Playing » 20 weeKs' engagement in Weber a 
tions at Mason Opera House, Los 



nd Fields' produc 
les. Cal. 



"THE ATHLETIC GIRL" 



BELLE GOR 



lit 




WEEK JUNE 11— METROPOLITAN THEATRE, SANS SOUCI PARK, CHICAGO. 



CHARLES 



LAURA 



HAIGHT S DEAN 



Presenting "A MISFIT MEETING" 

A FEW MORE BRICKS BOLD LAST WEEK. 



u 



N 



ELTINGE 



An International Triumph 
A ROYAL, HIT AT THE 



N. S. BENTHAM O. H. HARR AS. 

Personal Manager 
ED MA1KUM. Press Representative. 




Harry Holman 

The polite comedian with the red suit who reads the rhymee out of the 
red book la at Pastor's next week. Come have a look. What timet Don't 
know. Perhaps you'd better bring your trunk. 

GEO. P. MURPHY, Jr. 

German Comedian 

Reengaged next season. 
FEATURED MANAGEMENT CAMPBELL A DREW. 



E 



11 1 



IE LEONARD 



IN D I X I E LAND 

ASSISTED BT MoOLOIN A SMITH. 
Featured for the summer with a big minstrel show for Jake Wells. 
There will be no more trouble under the direction of William Morris. 



THE WORLD'S 



IVIardo Trio 

OOMINQ EAST. Open from Smmtombor !Oth. For tints and term. ..dross REIOH, PLUNKETT & WESLEY, St. Jmntms Bldg., Rmam WM4 

When tfttwerisf •dvtrtiirmentt ki nd ly mention Variety. 



20 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



THE REAL 

PARODY 

ACT 



WE WRITE AND SING OUR OWN MATERIAL, THUS ENABLING US TO RESPOND TO THOSE HEARTY LAUGHS AND ENCORES WITH A CLEAR CON- 
SCIENCE. VOW PIRATES, PLEASE BE GOOD. 

CHAS. and FANNY VAN 



OUR BOSOM FRIENDS 



MYERS A KELLER 



SNITZ MOORE 

The Well-known German Dialect Comedian 
Has closed with EUROPEAN SENSATION CO , and is now preparing 

A NEW ACT FOR VAUDEVILLE 

SOMETHING ENTIRELY OUT OF THE ORDINARY 

WATCH THIS SPACE FOR EXTRAORDINARY ANNOUNCEMENTS. Somethin* new that will sur- 
prise yon. 

That's all Just now. 

"There Is no more genuinely funny player of German roles on the stage to-day than Snlta Moore, the 
chief funmaker In the Gayety'a Mil thla week. Moore's methods are Ms own In treat degree and ha la 
Imitated more often than he Imitates." — Pittsburg Gssette. 

Address 3110 COTTAGE GROVE AVENUE, OHIO AGO 

THE GREAT R OS A IRE 

DIRECTION BOYLE AGENCY 

31 WEST 31st STREET • - NEW YORK CITY 



Mr. Fred Karno's S c. 

11 A Night in an English Music Hall" 

Manager, AXF. REEVES. Agents, Win. MORRIS and H.B. M ARINBLLI 



Notice to Proprietors, Managers and Others Interested 

The sketch is the property of and was produced by Mr. Fred 
Karno in London, and all rights are legally protected. Infringe- 
ments of same will be immediately dealt with. 



VOW PLATING GREAT ORPHEUM CIRCUIT. 



•NOTICE- 



THE BIRD ACT 

LAMONT'S 
TRAINED AUSTRALIA COCKATOOS 



NOW BOOKING PARK TIME. 



Address UNION HOTEL, 117 Randolph St., CHICAGO, ILL. 



FRED 



"THE MUSICAL LAUGH MAKERS" 

ECKHOFF » GORDON 



ANNA 



TWENTY-rOUR MINUTES 

REAL MUSIC REAL OOMEDY 



SOLID LAUGHS AND APPLAUSE 



AWAY FROM AI«I* OTHERS 
Address REICH, PLUNKETT ft WESLEY, 1133 Broadway, N. Y. City 



PRESS WORK, DOES IT PAY? 



ASK THE STARS—SOME FOR 
WHOM I'VE WORKED. 




Tea itudai- 

f ord. Veil* Berfea, 

Cnomu Q. Beabrooks. Anal* Disk, 

Jeannette Lowrie, Mabelle Oilman, Irene Beatley, 

Blue Fay, Mr*. Yeamang, E* telle Wentworth, Ckeridah lipa. 

Amy Rloard, Edna Goodrich, Jeanette Dupree, EHiage, Eddie Leesaxd, 

Carleton Maoy, Maude Hall, Louise Allen Collier, etc. 

31 West 31st Street, New York 




Magician, Mimic, Hand Shadowist 
and Entertainer Par Excellence 



JEANETTE DM 

HOTEL NAVARRE. NEW YORK. 



IRENE LA TOUR 



AND HER 
CLEVER DOG 



ZAZA 



ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO 

991 GARDEN ST., HOBOKEN, N. J. 



BELL and HENRY 

"THE SLEEPY MAN," 

Will shortly arrive in America. 



Dick McAllister 

"THAT BAD BOY" 

in a "Nifht la an Enjliah Muilo Hall." 

(jEo. j. Mmm 

BARITONE, 

With VIOLA GILLETTE 

IV VAUDEVILLE. 



SHEPPARD CAMP 

•'THE. MAM FROM OEORmiA" 



FOR SALE 

WIGGINS FARM 



May Ward 

New York's 
Fmvorlte Comedienne 

F. X. HENNESSY 

Irish Union 
PIPER 

snd Violinist 

(musician). 

Permanent address, 
* MILITARY HALL, 
^198 Bowery, 

rXHr.NNr.SSY j „ ££%? «■ 

L eona Jhurber 

AND HER 

4 BLACKBIRDS 

Booked solid Season 1906-7. 
Direction Iff. S. Bentham. 
Fiekaninnles jjjsjjag German. 





Regards 

to 
Vaudeville 





De 

Unbleached 

American 



STARRING IN "RUFUS RASTUS" 



MANAGEMENT HURTIG (EX 5EAMON 
When ttM\oerin§ • dv m' t U+Mmt* kindly mmtion Vaaiett. 



VARIETY 



21 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




"THE GERMAN MILLIONAIRES" 

ADAMS^EDWARDS 



In a pot-pourri of GERMAN COMEDY and GRAND OPERA (not burlesque, but real singing) 

also Featuring Mr. Adam's BONE SOLOS and FIVE STYLES OF WOODEN SHOE DANCING 



ONE OF THE BEST DRESSED COMEDY ACTS IN VAUDEVILLE 



Booked by Western Vaudeville Association, Majestic Theatre, Chicago. Ask Jake Sternad 

PERMANENT ADDRESS, DARE VARIETY DHIOADO OFFICE, 79 S. OLARK STREET 



BESSIE VALDARES 

TROUPE OF CYCLISTS AND UNICYCLISTS 

SMARTEST DRESSED AND MOST REFINED BICYCLE ACT BEFORE THE PUBLIC. 

IDA CARLE. REPRESENTATIVE. 

HarryW.SpingoldeiCo.(4) 

OFFER A ONE-ACT MUSICAL FARCE COMEDY ENTITLED 

"A HANDSOME STRANGER** 

The laughing hit of every bill. Now booking for Summer and next season. Address all flrst-olass 
agents or Harry W. Spingold, care Variety, Chicago office, 79 8. Clark street. 



AL. SHEAN— WARREN, GHAS. 



IN THEIR ORIGINAL TRAVESTIES 



QUO VADIS-CAPT. KIDD 

PER ADD., SI CHESTER STREET, MOUNT VERNON, N V 

Season 1907-8 Starring under direotion of Percy Williams. 

MIKE BERNARD 

Pianist at Pastor's Theatre 

Can accept other engagements. Club work especially. Address care of Pastor's Theatre. 




HARRY JOLSON 



"THE GHE1TO SPORT 11 



The Clever 

Singing 

Comedian 



Always in demand. No other act like it in vaudeville or other branch. I stand alone. Will consider offers for musical comedy or burlesque. 

Permanent Address, care VARIETY, Chicago Office, 79 S. Clark Street 



THE THREE RUBES CLIFF E BERZAC 



BOWERS, WALTERS & CROOKER 



The Laughter Maker 



EG CENT RIO COMBO Y ACT 



AH Agents 



AOKMT. H B. MAKIMELLI 



CALL) 

Reward will bo paid to all managers and agenU for the oapturo of the laugh-making 



HEBREW COMEDIAN 



HARRY HARVEY 

At Bid J. Euson'a Theatre, Chicago, for the summer; at Liberty for next season. Musical oomedy or 
burlesque. Address care WESTERN OFFICE OF VARIBTY. 79 8. Clark street, Chicago. 

NOW BOOKING rOR NEXT SEASON 

THE 
GREAT 

4 'The Magician Who Draws the People" 

IN AN ENTIRELY NEW PROGRAM OF MAGIO NOW IN PREPARATION. 




EDDIE SIMMONS 

■""""SBmri I lailn 5JSS '■— 



• M««r 



,"Te)n»" 



?,?»* DUPREE 

Bmrman Ommmdy by Frmnk Kmitnmdy 



ALLAN 




Premier Manipulator off the World 

Returned from Australian Triumphs. Unique, Refined, Artistic Novelty. 
Address, 1193 Broadway, Room 9, New York City. 



Week June 10— Fountain Ferry Park. 

Week June 17— East End Park, Memphis, Tenn. 



Week June 25— Majestic Theatre, Chicago, 111. 
Week July 9— Olympic Theatre, Chicago. 111. 



The 4 




SISTERS AND BROTHERS THE DANCING STARS 

Have closed a very successful season with the great Orpheum Road Show. Are booked solid for 1906-7 under the management of Mr. Kohl, of Kohl and Castle. 

When antwerinff advertUementt kindly mention VARIETY. 



V 



22 



VARIETY 






REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



M O WATTS 

SEASON 1900 KINOLINO BROS.-aiMON I9QT BVROPB 





THE SINGING SENSATION ! 

MaudeRockwell 



PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO. NEW 



YORK SHORTLY 
CLARK ST., CHICAGO. 



MANAGEMENT CHRIS 0. BROWN, f? S. 



TIM McMAHON'S GIRLS 




BURLESQUE STOCK 

SUMMER 1906 



COLUMBIA STOCK, BOSTON. 
LYCEUM STOCK, WASHINGTON. 

T. W. DIN KINS. 1402 Broadway, NEW YORK 



LAFAYETTE STOCK, BUFFALO. 
BLTOU STOCK, PHILADELPHIA. 



Willie Weston 

THE POCKET EDITION OF THE PEOPLE HE IMITATES. 

exclusive Agent. AL MAYER. St. Jamti Bids. BOOKED SOLID. 




NYE 



Assisted 
by his 



ROLLICKING GIRLS 






Have Your Card in Variety 

ANYBODY CAIN DO IT 

HOW TO BEAT TIE RAILROAD CO. 

For full information address 

JOSEPH K. WATSON 

Care Variety or 2117 N. 31st Street, Philadelphia 

NOTICE TO WISE ONES. WALK IS NOT THE ANSWER 

LILY SEVILLE 



Europe for summer. 



ENGLISH COMEDIENNE. 
Open Keith Circuit September. 



IDA CARLE, Representative. 



"THE SOCIABLE GUY" 





Hebrew Comedian who can Talk, Slag, 
Dance and Play principal Hebrew parts 
In Burlesque or Farce Comedy. 

AT I IRFRTV for N * xt Sca » on - 

III LIDI.nl I Address, VARIETY, 
Chicago Office, 79 S. Clark Street. 



Walter Stanton & Co. 

"THE ENCHANTED WOOD" 

Booking' for next season i 

THE FAMOUS CHANT ROOSTER AOT 

Open for immediate time 
Address cere Variety, Chicago office. 79 S. Clark Street 

WORLD'S GREATEST BAG PUNCHER 

SEEBACK 



OPEN CHALLENGE TO THE WORLD. 



WEEK JUNE 11— ELECTRIC PARK, ALBANY, N. T. 



Royal Musical 5 



KEITH and ORPHEUM CIRCUITS 
commencing September 



REICH, PLUNKETT « WESLEY 
ST. JANES BLDG. 



TON 

10TTA 

AND 

(UfFORD 




e 



3 HYLANDS 



PRESENTING A COMEDY SINGING, DANCING AND MUSICAL ACT. 



Introducing Master Hyland, the only child Baton manipulator in the world. Managers wishing a good 
feature act for next season. Per. address, 28 Osborne St., Danbury, Conn. 

P. W. 8BELBY 

Curtin & Blossom 



In Mixtures 



INTRODUCING SINGING AND DANCING. COMEDY ACROBATIC. 

A GIRL WHO CAN SING COON SONGS WITH A DIALECT. 
ADDRESS 74 SOUTH 2D ST., BROOKLYN, OR ALL AGENTS. 





Cogswell 



DRAMATIC SOPRANO. 
Replacing Miaa Wilson, of Stanley and Wilson. 
PERMANENT ADDRESS. 64 W. 68TK ST., NEW YORK CITY. 



^ 



When answering advertisement* kimdty stfftffem VasHTT. 



VARIETY 



23 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



LUCY 



AND 



LUCIER 



in their Comedy Sketeh "THE FOOL'S ERRAND" 

Just closed a successful Mason on the Orphenm, Hopkins' and Kohl * Castle circuits. BOOKED SOLID FOR NBIT SEASON by J. J. 
Mutdock. J. Sternad and Bd. Hay man of the Western Taude villa Association. Majestic Theatre Build in*. Chicago. 



Address care VAHIBTY, Chicago Office. 79 S. Clark St. 



OUR ROUTE FOR NEXT SEASON. 
Sept. 8— Keith's, Cleveland, 0. 

" 10— G. O. H., Pittsburg, Pa. 

" 17— Chase's, Washington, D. C. 

" 24 — Maryland. Baltimore, Md. 
Oct. 1— Keith's, Philadelphia, Pa. 

" «— Keith's, Providence, R. I. 

" 15 — Keith's, Boston, Mass. 

" 22— Moore's, Portland, Me. 

" 29 -Keith's, New York City. 
Nov. 6— O. O. H., Syracuse. N. Y. 

" 12— Temple, Detroit. Mich. 

•• ltt— Moore's, Rochester, N. Y. 

" 20— Shea'a, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Dec :i -Shea's, Toronto, Can. 

" 10— Travel. 

" 17— Majestic. Chicago. 

" 24 — Hajrmarket, Chicago. 

" 31— Columbia, St. Louis. 
Jan. 7 — Olympic, Chicago. 

" 14 — O. O. II., Indianapolis. 

" 21— Columbia, Cincinnati. 

" 28— Hopkins'. Louisville. 
Feb. 8 — Hopkins', Memphis, Tenn. 

" 10— Majeatic. Little Rock. Ark. 
Other dates to follow. 



The Celebrated Comie Opera Star 

MISS VIRGINIA EARL 



AND HER 



JOHNNIES 



WHEELER EARL 

The Butler 
FRANK GARFIELD 
JOS. W. HERBERT, Jr. 



ALBERT L. PELLATON 
ED. T. MORA 
HARRY L. TIGHE 
Accompanist 



Staged by ED. ROGERS. 



«.... INNESS & RYAN «•«'•>■ 



BOOKED SOLID. 



PLATING THE WESTERN PARKS. 



AGENT, JO PAIGE SMITE. 





MAC ART 



AND CO. 



"The Man From Macy's" 



BY WILL H CBESBY AND IBA DODGE. 



Opening Week of Jane 18th, PROCTOR'S THEATRE. ALBANY 

Mmnmgement of LOUIS WESLEY 
REIOH, PLUHKETT A WESLEY, - - St. Jamms BuUtHng 

Send 50 Cents and have VARIETY 
forwarded to you for three months 
during the summer. 

WILFRED CLARKE 

Assisted by MISS THEO CAHEW <& CO. 

Prt tenting His Sketches 

NO MORE TROUBLE *nd WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT 

ADDRESS, LAMMS' OLUB 









AT LIBERTY NEXT SEASON. 



PHlLBROOKSiREYNOLDS 

PRESENTING 

40 MISS STENO, STENOGRAPHER" 

A GERMAN COMEDY SKETCH. 

In preparation a oomedy act In on*. Address WM. M0RRD3. 



Hal Godfrey & Co. 



PRESENTING NEXT SEASON 
Hi 




Wton 



AND 
THE 




"THE LIAR" By Edmund Day AND "A VERY BAD BOY" By rthur Lamb 

Two of the few standard sketches in Vaudeville. 

Address all communications to REICH, PLUNKETT A WESLEY, exclusire scents. 

Irving Trio 



NOW BOOKING NEXT SEASON. 



AT HOME NEXT WEEK, JUNE 10TH. 



FARM THEATRE, TOLEDO, OHIO. 



WILLIAM 




(Late With RICHARD CARLE) 

Creator of The Eph-oph-soph-alos of "The Storks"; A. Qrouch in " The Explorers"; The Hindoo In "The 
Forbidden Land "; Chinaman in " The Tenderfoot "; and The Song Book Boy in " The Mayor of Toklo." 

Begs to announce that he has severed his long and friendly connection with Mr. Carle to enter VAUDEVILLE. 

Particulars later. Address, Care VARIETY, Chicago Office, 79 S. Clark Street. 

H'Aen otuwarme odvmrUtemtntt kindly m§ntion VARIETY. 



24 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




BEATRICE McKENZIE 

—■ « Supported bv WALTER SHANNON and CO. 

Ia Lew H. Newoomb's delightful musical playlet, "A MONTANA BEAUT," in vaudeville. Have a 
few «Mki open. Address oar* Variety, Chicago office, 79 B. Olark It. 

McGloin -Smith 

Artistic Delineators of Refined Sinking and Wooden Shoe Dancing 
THE DANCING WONDERS 

JACK LILLIAN 

BROWN I WRIGHT 

GREATE8T NOVELTY SINGING AND DANCING ACT IN VAUDEVILLE. 



THE ORIGINAL. 



Three Madcaps 

NINA AMY PANSY 



BOOKED SOLID 



Address AL. riA\ER. St. James Building 

HIGH CLASS VAUDEVILLE ARTISTS. 

HANSON and DREW 

In their ORIGINAL act entitled 

"THE BILL, POSTER" 

First produced and copyrighted in 1901. "Pirates, keep off!" 
Time all filled 1906 and 1907. Thanks to managers and agents for offers. 

Si Brooks Did M Jeanette 

'•ON THE MAIN STREET" 

14 Minutes In One Permanent Address, 20 E. 113th Street 



*m 



COLLINS 




BROWN 



•I 



In an 
AFFAIR OF HONOR" 



Asa Entire New Offering 
in the Dutch Field. 





LALECT COMEDIAN. 



CLARK 

CLOSED SEASON WITH MINER'S AMERICANS. 



AT LIBERTY for BURLESQUE or FARCE COMEDY 

Oregon Daily Journal: "E. A. Clark, the German, wears the hemp locks, shoulder length, and the 
open and shut face, and the audience saw at once from the make-up that he was going to be funny and 
laughed at his every word." ADDRE8S 245 W. 86TH ST., NEW TORX CITY. 

THE MUSICAL BELLBOY AND MILITARY MAID. 

fred GRAY and GRAHAM nellie 

FEATURING LARGEST AND SMALLEST SAXOPHONE IN THE WORLD. 

MITCHELL and MARRON 

ORIGINAL TWO-MAN MINSTRELS. 



An agent met an actor once 

While walking down Broadway. 

"Where goest thou?" the agent said, 
"A word with thee, I pray." 



"I must away," the actor said, 

"To do another stunt; 
I have an act the managers want, 

I am going to the front." 



MA DELL & CORBLEY 

AT HOME NEXT WEEK, JUNE 10TH. FARM THEATRE, TOLEDO, OHIO. 

CAMPBELL & JOHNSON 

COMEDY ACROBATIC CYCLISTS 

Just olosed successful season with Orpheum Road Show. Prootor'a and Keith's Circuits to follow. 

Correspondents Wanted 

Wherever there ie s Summer Park, Vaudeville or Burlesque Theatre 




SENSATIONAL ^ COMEDY 



TO LET by our only agents MYERS & KELLER, 



31 WEST 3 1 ST STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 



*■>■ 



REGARDS TO KATE KLAXTON 

L4f JLsfliA AM«#tt>4f~tflD 



VARIETY 



25 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



F»MIL/*DELF»M1« UNANIMOUSLY 



NDO 



WILLIAM COURTLEIGH 



A GO. In 



ct 



UNDER THE 

By R. 



THIRD DEGREE" 












C yVVacCULLOCH 



: 



Philadelphia Press: The leading feature at 
Keith's Chestnut Is the first appearance In this 
city of the favorite actor, William Courtlelgh, in 
his new protean play, "Under the Third Degree," 
written for him by Campbell MacCnlloch. Mr. 
Oonrtleigh appears in eight different character 
parts, the scene being a private office in a New 
York police headquarters at night. These charac- 
ters represent a variety of types, mostly charac- 
ters of the street. Mr. Courtleigh's finished art 
was shown depicting these, making each distinct. 
They proved that besides being an actor he has 
made a most careful study of human character. 
He was capably assisted by John Dillon, William 
R. Randall and John Roacbe. 

Philadelphia Inquirer: Precedence must be given 
to William Courtlelgh and bis supporting company 
in "Under the Third Degree" in the review of the 
program offered at Keith's yesterday. Mr. Court- 
lelgh essayed no less than eight distinct and well- 
drawn character portrayals, and, with a possible 
exception, he was convincing in all. His work 
was clean-cut and artistic. The playlet, which is 
well constructed, savors somewhat of one that 
was introduced in New York recently by a foreign 
actor who Interpreted as many characters, but it 
Is doubtful if he achieved a greater element of 
success. The story is woven around a mysterious 
case of arson and the action takes place In a 
police station, the witnesses of various nationali- 
ties being brought before the lieutenant to give 
their evidence, which practically — circumstantially, 
at least — convicts one Jim Warner, a mechanic, of 
having set fire to the house. When told that his 
child had perished he breaks down and confesses. 
A wide range of character work was done by Mr. 
Courtlelgh, and he was ably assisted by William 
R. Randall, as the inspector; John Dillon and 
John Roacbe. 

Philadelphia North American: How good in the 
amusement way vaudeville can be is shown in the 
current bill at Keith's Chestnut Street Theatre. 



One of the best features was a new playlet, 
"Under the Third Degree." performed by William 
Courtlelgh and several able assistants. It tells of 
a case of incendiarism in which a police inspector 
examines eight witnesses, a politician, a German 
groceryman, an Italian, a Chinaman, Jew, Irish 
otiicer and others, who testify concerning the 
crime. Mr. Courtlelgh performs these latter nu- 
merous characters and his rapid changes of cos- 
tume, make-up and natural personation of the 
parts are as remarkable as they are artistic. 

Philadelphia Public Ledger: The bill in Keith's 
Theatre presented a varied and one of the most 
entertaining programs that has been given this 
season. Heading the list Is William Courtlelgh 
in the protean play, "Under the Third Degree." 
by Campbell MacCullocb. Courtlelgh imperso- 
nates eight different characters while undergoing 
what is known in present day police circles as 
"the sweating process." In the role of Jim War- 
ner he is charged with arson, and the police In- 
spector Is quizzing various witnesses to fasten the 
case upon him. The changes are made with fair 
rapidity and are well done as to make-up and 
dialect. Several of them are difficult and give 
Courtlelgh an excellent opportunity to display his 
versatility. He Is a clever actor and deserved the 
warm applause he received for bis efforts. Will- 
iam R. Randall filled the role of Inspector satis- 
factorily, and the play can be credited with mak- 
ing a hit on its first presentation here. 



Philadelphia Evening Telegraph: Though last 
night's weather was of a description which might 
be supposed to prompt persons having homes to 
remain there, a sufficient number of summer-clad 
pneumonia invlters ventured forth as to com- 
pletely fill Keith's Theatre from lower floor to top 
gallery. And the entertainment provided amply 
repaid them for any risk they may have sustained 
from the elements. That capital actor, William 
Courtlelgh, had a prominent pi. ce on the bill. He 

7VI. 



appeared in a sketch entitled "Under the Third 
Degree," which gave him a chance to essay eight 
distinct characters. 

The action of the playlet takes place in a New 
York police station and concerns a case of arson 
for which Jim Warner has been arrested. Wit- 
nesses of different nationalities are brought be- 
fore the inspector to tell "their little bit" about 
the "case," Courtlelgh impersonating them. War- 
ner Is "sweated" with all the "fireworks" and 
questionable methods usually employed in such 
contingencies, and Is about to triumph in the 
severe ordeal when the inquisitors tell him that 
his invalid child perished in the fire. Then he 
breaks down, admits the arson charge and asks 
that they do with him as they will. With one 
exception Mr. Courtleigh's impersonation of the 
eight characters was perfect. The exception was 
n Hebrew clothier, Isaac Silverstein, usually re- 
garded, as easy of stage portraiture, but Mr. 
Courtlelgh emphatically missed in this part. He 
should cut Silverstein out; It would not injure the 
sketch any. As It Is, however, it is one of the 
most interesting pieces of its kind ever given in 
vaudeville. 



Philadelphia Record: In a bill of such general 
excellence as was that offered at Keith's Theatre 
yesterday it Is difficult to single out any act and 
to declare it to be the best. There was not a 
number on the long and diversified program that 
was not good, and some of the offerings were 
genuine novelties. Fspeclal interest, of course, 
was in the play offered by William Courtlelgh and 
called "Under the Third Degree." The scene is 
set in the "sweat-box" of police headquarters in 
New York, and an inspector puts the "third de- 
gree" to eight witnesses, each of whom he ex- 
amines separately to determine the Identity of a 
man suspected of arson. Courtlelgh Impersonates 
each of the eight witnesses in turn, and so clev- 
erly does be change his voice, manner of speaking 
and his general appearance that it is almost im- 

BEINTHAM, Agent. 



possible to believe that It Is always the same 
actor. William R. Randall gave an excellent In- 
terpretation of a police Inspector and John Dillon, 
in the minor role of a detective sergeant, helped 
to round out the production. The play held the 
Interest of the audience and was very well re- 
ceived. 

Philadelphia Evening Bulletin: William Court- 
lelgh heads the bill at Keith's Theatre this week 
In a protean play by Campbell MacCnlloch, en- 
titled "Under the Third Degree," in which be as- 
sumes eight distinctly different characters. The 
principal part la that of a young mechanic who Is 
accused of arson, and the others are witnesses who 
appear in the case— Chinaman, Dutchman, Italian, 
tough, etc. The play has interest and dramatic 
strength and affords Mr. Courtlelgh opportunity to 
display I. Is versatility and talent. 

Philadelphia Item: In spite of the severe rain 
storm, the usual Immense audience assembled at 
Keith's million-dollar theatre yesterday afternoon 
to enjoy a bill of the highest Interest and ex- 
cellence. 

There were seven emphatic hits on the long 
program. 

Special attention centered on William Court 
lelgh's work In "Under the Third Degree," In 
which he Impersonated a man accused of arson, a 
Chinaman, a policeman, a weak-minded brother, 
the owner of the building, a German grocer, an 
Italian peddler of statues and a Hebrew; all these 
were called as witnesses In the case. Each Imper- 
sonation was so clever that the applause increased 
as the play continued, while the curtain was re- 
peatedly raised at the conclusion. The Idea of the 
sketch Is based on Henri de Vties' "A Case of 
Arson," which was adapted from the French, and 
proved such a success in London that he brought 
it to New York City. The locale is cbsngsd to 
New York. 




OPERA TRIO 



Mme. Anna Plum. Signori Tortorico and Busbi. 

In condensed versions of "II Trovatore" and "Faust" trios. 
Scenery and costume ohanges. IDA CARLE, Representative, St. James Building, 

OFFERS INVITED 

Brooks and Vedder 

A 15-MINUTE COMEDY ENTITLED 

"NOT YET ??? BUT SOON " 

104 W. 40TH ST., HEW YORK GITT. FINISH IN ONE. 

WEES JUNE 11, FAMILY THEATRE, GLOVER8VILLE, N. Y. 

THE BLACK ACT 

JACK WILSON & CO. 



Eugene and Willie Howard 

(HOWARD dt HOWARD) 

The Original Hebrew Messenger Boys 



ALL OTHBKS 4KB IMITATORS 



Frank 



McCREA and POOL 



Roy 






SENSATIONAL SHOOTING ACT 

OPEN CHALLENGE TO THE WORLD SHOOTING AT A HUMAN TARGET. NO ONE BARRED. 
Address AL MAYER, Room 810, St. James Building. Booked solid until June, 1907. 



THE SOCIABLE GUY 



» » 



ALBERT GREEN 



-WITH- 

-nr- 



"AN UPHEAVAL IN 

II MINUTES IN ONE. 



DARKTOWN" 

ASZ MYEBS * KELLER. 



BARNEY FIRST 

THE HEBREW WITH EDUCATED FEET. 

Introducing good singing, talking and Hebrew buck dancing. Have some weeka open for Parks. 

Address "Variety," Chicago office, 79 8. Clark St. 

Have Your Card in VARIETY 






THE 

GIRL 

IN 

TROUSERS 



THE AGT BEAUTirUU 





AND HER 

CANDY KIDS 



NOW BOOKING FOR NEXT SEASON 

Whan on*\cmring adverti$emmt$ kindly mention Variety. 



. 



26 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 

























































MARVELOUS 





MOST WONDERFUL GYMNASTS 
HAMMBRSTEIIS'S PARADISE GARDENS INOIA/ 

BOOKED «OI>IP SEASON 19Q6-07 Qy /WYERS &C 



THE WORLD 

IN 



EXCLUSIVE AGENT** 



Roland West 

PROTEAN ARTIST 

BIG HIT AT HURTIO * SEAMON'S 

Management of LOUIS WESLEY, 

Reich, Plunkett & Wesley, St. James Building 



▲ HUMOROUS, ENTERTAINING NOVELTY. 
(▲ BBAL CHINAMAN— NOT A FAKE.) 



LEE-TUNG-FOO 

WORLD'S ONLY CHINESE BARITONE. 

Singing American, German and Chinese Bongi. June 11 — Hammerstein'« Roof Garden. 



NAT 



SOL 



Fields 



A 



N 



D 



Fields 



With T. W. Dinklns next season. Puffing on both shows. 

Thanks fo managers for offers. 

Address FIELDS AND FIELDS, Care T. W. Dinklns, Knickerbocker Theatre 

Building, New York. 






SAILED TODAY AT LAST 



THE GERMAN POLITICIAN 

CLIFF GORDON 



ORPHEUM, LOS ANGELES. JUNE 10-17. 



THE MAIN 
WITH THE 
BO U IN G - 
IING HATS 



CHUTES, SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE MJULY 1. 






THE BANDIT 



His owij melodramatic success. Now booking season 1906-07. 
Week June 18, Majestic Theatre, Chicago. Adrtreas all communica- 
tions ease ••Variety," Chicago Offlce. 79 8. Clark St., or my solo 
agent, Mr. Edward Hayman, Western Vaudeville Assn., Chicago. 



WB PRCDIGTED t\ WINNER AND MERE IT IS 

FRANCES SWARTZ & CO. 

Presenting Her Sensational Dramatic Succosa in Vaudeville entitled 

"THE END" 

For time address: Frances Swarta ft Co., care of Lee B. Orabbe, 118 West Sd St., Davenport, Iowa. 

JEANNE BROOKS 

"The Girl with the Smile." 

Booked Solid Summer Season by William Morris' 
Chicago Office, 167 Dearborn Street. 

Arthur Rigby 

"PURVEYOR OF FUN" 

EH ROUTE SULLIVAN-CONSIDINE CIRCUIT 



James F.Dolan Ida Lenharr 

Presenting Mr. Dolan's Original Farces, 

"THE WIRE TAPPER," "TAKING CHANCES." 

"THE HIGH TONED BURGLAR," "A BIT OF TRAVESTY." 

PERMANENT ADDRESS, 267 W. 111TH ST., NEW YORK. 

HAVE YOUR CARD IN VARIETY 





Management JACK LEVY, 1 40 W. 42d 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Vardttt. 



• • 



VARIETY. 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




/v*SiO/?&/<S 



EM Blondell 

Address Willlan iorris 

EMMA FRANCIS 



f . Daly Burgess 

COMEDIAN 
And til* Dot, - FINNEGAN 

In Vaudeville 



and 

her 



Arabian Whirlwinds 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

direction or u. s. sentham 

RICE&PREVOST 

IN 

BUMPTY BUMPS 

Arthur J. Miss Grace 

McWATERS ... TYSON 

In a Spectacular Musical Comedy 
"VAUDEVILLE" 

WEEK JUNE 11— G. 0. H., PITTSBURG. 
WEEK JUNE 18— TEMPLE, DETROIT. 

D UNEDIN T ROUPE 

WORLD-FAMED MARVELLOUS 

ARTISTIC and ACROBATIC CYCLISTS 

Introducing Cycling on the Telephone Wire. 
Challenge the world to find their equal. JA8. E. 
DONEOAN, Managing Director. Permanent ad- 
dress: Forepaugh A Belle Bros.' Show. 

STM BROTHERS 

Variety's Greatest Comedy Cycle Act 

Oonoluding with a eerie* of poaea, aooompanied by 

a monologue by FRED ST. ONOE. 

Agent, WILLIAM MORRIS. 




WEEK NAY 21, PASTOR'S 

81gned with Bob Manchester for next season. 

JOE EDMONDS 

""" tegg^H Vaudeville 
LOUISE DRESSER 

Characteristic Songs 



<•• 




I 




F 



THE REAL GERMAN COMEDIANS 

ields-Wolley 

"A TRIP IN AN AIRSHIP." 

Week June 4, Electric Park, Baltimore. 

ED. F.REYNARD 

Ventriloquist 



Seaaon 1901-8— Great Lafayette Show. 
Season 



1908-8— 



Primrose and Dockatader'e 



Season 
Season 
Season 
Season 



( Minstrels and Empire Show. 
1903-4 — Orpheum Show. 
1904-6 — Touring England. 
1906-6 — Touring- America. 
1906-7— Orpheum Show. 

Exclusive Agent. WILLIAM MORRIS. 



Ii Browning 

IN THEIR NEWEST COMEDY SKETCH IN ONE. 
ENTITLED 

"GOING INTO VAUDEVILLE." 
WEEK JUNE 11TH— TONY PASTOR'S. A FEW 
WEEKS OPEN. 

BILLIE RITCHIE 



Welcome Heme 

SAM RICE 

121 W. 95TH ST., NEW YORK CITY. 

V. P. WOODWARD 

Uambotirine Juggler 

OPEN TIME ADDRESS MORRIS 



CHA8. B. 



LILLY B. 



Colby -May 

The Ventriloquist and 

The Dancin* Dell 

In Europe for Ont Year. 

Playing Return Dates Everywhere* 

Per. Add. 20 Wellington St.. Strand W. 0, 
London, England. 



'fchaa (TWO) 



Alice 



44 



The Drunk" 



A Night in an English Music Hall 

10 MINUTES IN ONE. 

HELSTON & 0LLA-H00D 

SINGING, DANCING, COMEDY 



INVITE OFFERS 
NEXT SEASON 



IN STOCK 
RIVERSIDE PARK. 
BOISE CITY, IDAHO. 



1906 



1907 



CHARLEY HARRIS 

THE HEBREW GLAZIER. 
THE INSPECTOR. 
THE GIBSON GIRL. 
80 MINUTES LAUGH— 1, I, 1. 
Late of Harris A Walters. 



JAGK NORWORTM 

Present* THE COLLEGE BOY 



Shrodes 



RENTED 



JOE 



and 



HAYMAN 

MILDRED 

FRANKLIN 



In "A SUIT FOR DIVORCE" 

Now playing In England. 

WILLIAMS 

AND DIXEY 

Presenting "A MAKE8HIFT BENEFACTOR," 
A refined singing, talking and dancing act. 
Per. Addresa, 217 W. 16th St., New York City. 

A. H. WOODS 

Can nee sinter nets and sketch teams for 
nsmt season. 

0E0.W.I11JSSEY&C0. 

VEHTBILOQUIAL COMEDY. 

BURROWS -TRAVIS (0. 

WE£K JUNE 4— BAYONNE, N. J. 

weskjune 11— r 



-VERPLANK, N. Y. 



THE FAMOUS 

Colby Family 

IN VAUDEVILLE. 
Booked solid for next aeeaon by Was. Morris. 

Gartelle Bros. 

SKATORIALISM 



AGENTS TAKE NOTICE. 



555 



e 



ZARELLS 



EUROPEAN EQUILIBRISTS— SOMETHING NEW 



Ross«"-Vack 

QERMAN COMEDIANS 
Permanent address, 11 Weat 114th St., New York, 



The Demi-Tasse 




Comedian, 



Cjcfifi-f ♦ s «m 



•THE NARROW FELLER." 



h 



HILL AND 

SYLVIANY 

Address REICH, PLUNKETT A WESLEY, 

St. James Building. 

WEEK MAY SI AND 88, LUNA PARK, PITTS- 
BURG. PA. 

MUSIC1L SIMPSONS 

■ 

XL, and that means something. 

Have Your Card in VARIETY 



I ••. 



28 



VARIETY 






Jerome H. Remick & Co. 



NEVA/ vork: 



Here Are the Coming Song Successes Now Ready 
for Productions, Vaudeville Acts, Burlesques* Etc. 



ff 



"CHEYENNE" 

Cowboy love song 

"WHY DON'T YOU TRY? 

Novelty rolling chair song 

"ALICE, WHEREI ART THOU 

GOING?" 

Sensation Summer march long 



GOOD ADVICE" 

The newest coon song success 



"ANXIOUS" 

A novel song, good for any production 

"THE POOR OLD MAN" 

The greatest of all comic songs 

"JESSAMINE" 

A rattling good coon song 

"IS IT WARM ENOUGH FOR 

YOU?" 



The greatest of all Summer waltz songs 

"WHEN THE MOCKING BIRDS ARE SINGING IN THE WILDWOOD 



ft 



The greatest of all Ballad successes 



A|a . M fi j Beautiful colored slides are now ready for •• 'When the Mocking Birds Are Singing in 

OlIuBS HOW nGfldV th « Wildwood," '• Why Don't You Try?" •• In Dear Old Dixieland/' " We Parted By the 
=gga I River, Grace and I." NOW READY, slides for the famous cowboy song, "Cheyenne. 09 



MOSE CUMBLE, 



Mgr. Prof. Dept. 









WtA 



Wines, Liquors 
and Cigars 



AT VERY POPULAR PRICES 

Well known brands of highest grade* priced at leant one-third les* than the 
lowest of elswhere. 

Imported Strawberry Brandy 

The new after-dinner liqueur made from Very Old Cognac, delicionslj flavored 
with fresh, red, ripe strawberries. 

We are leaders in the distribution of the "New and Novel" In table luxuries 
as well as being the largest distributors in New York for high clasn and well 
known wines, whiskies and everything that should be found in the store of a first- 
class wine merchant. 

Imported Havana Cigars 

The following choice sizes of La Mas Fermosa Cigars are offered at lesa than 

cost of Imports tlon: 

Regular Price Sale Price Sale Price 

per 100. per 100. Box of SB. 

iBTcnoibles $26.00 $18.00 $4.50 

Predilectos 28.00 20.00 8.00 

Albas 28.00 20.00 $.00 

Imperial©. 80.00 22.00 8.80 

Eminentes 60.00 40.00 10.00 

These Cigars are in prime condition and the color assortment is complete. 

Msln Floor, East, Eighteenth Street 



MO CONNECTION *WTJl AMY OTHER STORE 



WJ 



J B GREENHUT.POES 



MfWYDRK 






An Ideal Route List 






\ 7ARIETY- intends shortly to carry a route list, com- 
plete in every particular. Artists may have their 
names listed with route two weeks in advance. 



The Feature of It 



will be that WHEN NOT PLAYING HAVE 
YOUR MAIL ADDRESS INSERTED 
INSTEAD. 

Through this means you will ALWAYS HAVE 
YOUR NAME ON THE LIST and may be 

reached at any time. 

It will be the only accurate variety 

directory. 



TWENTY-FOUR PAGES. 









« 



FIVE CENTS, 




VOL. in., NO. t. 



JUNE 16, 1906. 






PRICE FIVE CENTS. 







*Sjl'/>f/f,//*r 



J 



Entered at tccond clatt matter December 22, 1905, at the pott office at Hew Yorh y tf. 7-, unier the Sot of Oongrett a f March \ 1N7U. 









VARIETY 






■ . 



THE SITUATION. 

'1 he imjHirtant development of the week 
in the vaudeville situation has been the 
addition of the Albaugh Theatre in Bal- 
timore to the William Morris list. This 
places three houses outside New York City 
under the Morris booking direction which 
are in direct opposition to theatres in the 
same towns receiving their supply of acts 
from the Keith Agency. 

A report apparently having some foun- 
dation said that the Western Vaudeville 
Association members had signed with the 
Keith people under a ten years agree- 
ment, with a forfeiture clause appended 
to sustain which each deposited $60,000 
with a trust company. The time of sign- 
ing was said to have been on June C, the 
day before Messrs. Meyerfeld and lieck 
left for Chicago. 

Martin Beck, the general manager of the 
Orpheum circuit, returned to the city late 
this week for the purpose, it is said, of 
attaching his signature on behalf of the 
interests which he represents to an agree- 
ment with Keith for one year's duration 
only. Another purpose of Mr. Beck's 
quick return to jftw York is understood 
to be of authorizing H. H. Feiber to book 
foreign acts over the Western time in 
connection with the Keith circuit while 
Mr. Feiber is on the other side. 

Another and what seems probably the 
real reason for Beck's present visit is that 
he comes back prepared to show the man- 
agers of the Sullivan-Considine-Internat- 
tional Theatre circuits how a proper dis- 
position may be made of the John Cort 
circuit in the Northwest, which is now 
under contract to book through the West- 
ern Vaudeville Association, so that there 
will be no clash between the two in the 
far Western towns if the cheaper circuits 
will go into the Keith office. 

John W. Considine, who is yet in the 
city, is awaiting this information before 
arriving at a decision as to where book- 
ings may be placed most advantageously. 

The upshot may be that the Sullivan - 
(Vmsidine and its ally will continue to 
act as their own booking agents. 

Nothing further has made itself ap- 
parent in the proposed merger between 
Keith and Klaw & Erlanger. E. F. Albee 
lias tailed thus far to keep the promises 
made to Mr. Krlanger of what would re- 
sult alter the combination between IPtoc- 
tor and Poli was effected, and Mr. Er- 
langer is skeptical, continuing chary of 
any open agreement with the Keith peo- 
ple until he is shown sufficient reason why 
it will be to his benefit to join hands. 

The signing of the Western people with 
Keith would not lifted the present con- 
dition, and the managers connected with 
the Morris office do not seem concerned 
over that, nor the possibility of the Sul- 
liv.ni-CoMsidino circuit's going over to the 
other side. 

A BALTIMORE THEATRE WITH 
MORRIS. 

The Albatigh Theatre in Baltimore will 
change its policy to vaudeville next sea- 
son, booking under the direction of Mark 
A. Luescher through tin- office of William 
Morris in connection with the Percy Will- 
i.iuis circuit. 

The management of the house will not 
Ik* changed. Hubert Iv Irwin will continue 
in charge. The seating capacity is about 
1 ,350. 



HYDE & BEHMAN'S NEW BURLESQUE 

HOUSE. 

Chicago, June 15. 
Hyde & Behman, the Brooklyn, N. Y., 
managers who are members of the East- 
ern Burlesque Wheel, have purchased a 
piece of property two blocks east of the 
Haymarkct Theatre on Halstead street 
and will erect a theatre to be conducted 
in conjunction with the other houses on 
the Eastern Wheel circuit. 



A CENSOR COMMITTEE. 

Something entirely new in burlesque 
will be presented by the Empire Circuit 
(Western Burlesque Wheel) next season 
when its "censor committee" commences 
to work. 

A trio of capable managers connected 
with the Wheel has been appointed to 
overlook, supervise, suggest, add to and 
prune the shows playing over the circuit. 
Harry Martel, Maurie Jacobs and Will 
Drew will be the censors with power to 
take vigorous action whenever their de- 
mands are not complied with. 

The intention of the Wheel is to re- 
quire all the travelling combinations to 
maintain a standard of . excellence 
throughout the season. A member of the 
committee may drop in on a show un- 
awares any time. 



MAY HOWARD WONT RETIRE. 

Through a report circulated to the ef- 
fect that the "May Howard" company 
would no longer be an organization the im- 
pression became prevalent that the ''queen 
of burlesque" intended to quit the stage. 

Miss Howard grows indignant at the re- 
port and says that, while she could have 
re-engaged with J. E. Fennessy, her for- 
mer partner and manager, she ..'oncluded 
not to, and will either have a company 
of her own hereafter or play wherever her 
wishes dictate. 

She also states i mphatically that May 
Howard is a necessary fixture and for the 
welfare of burlesque, if nothing else, she 
has never for a moment thought of leav- 
ing it. j 



GEORGE VAN DUZER KILLED. 

Through an accident on the Central 
Kailroad of New Jersey on Monday last 
George van Duzer, of the Elite Musical 
Four, lost his life and Otto Mezlo. of the 
same act, was so seriously hurt that he 
may die at any time. The other mem- 
bers of the quartet also on the same train 
were Edgar Devaux and John J. Kimmel. 
Dcvaux was badly cut, but Kimmel 
escaped with slight injuries. 

After finishing last week at Young's 
Pier, Atlantic City, the four men took the 
fast express for New York, leaving At- 
lantic City at 8:30 a. m. At a speed of 
fifty miles an hour the train ran into an 
open switch. Van Duzer was the only 
pasaenger killed outright. 

All members of the quartet are well 
known professionally. Van Duzer was for 
a long time with Sousa's band. The Elite 
Musical Four was formed last October, 
when he became a memlier. 

"CANUCK" CIRCUIT SIGNS WITH 

KEITH. 

It is positively announced that the 
new Canadian circuit of vaudeville houses 
in London, Montreal, Ottawa and St. 
Thomas have contracted for its booking 
through the Keith Rooking Agency, pa- 
pers to that effects having been signed. 



CHANGES IN HARLEM. 

A change in the vaudeville map of Har- 
lem is scheduled for the fall. As an- 
nounced in Variety, Hurtig & Seamon's 
125th street music hall will be a bur- 
lesque house, playing Sunday vaudeville 
concerts, and report now has it that the 
Keith-Proctor firm will take over the Har- 
lem Opera House for a vaudeville theatre, 
turning over the Columbus, or 125th 
Street Theatre, to Walter J. Kelley, for 
his stock company. M. R. Bimberg handed 
Kelley a "hot" one when he presented a 
bill to the stock star for $600 for ten 
weeks' use of the stage of the Yorkville 
Theatre for rehearsals. When Kelley 
made his deal for the Yorkville he depos- 
ited $500 as a guarantee that he would 
fulfill his contract. Bimberg froze on to 
this, and credited the actor with the 
amount of the bill for rehearsals. 



KOHL & CASTLE HAVE OPPOSITION. 

Chicago, June 15. 

Kohl & Castle's Haymarket Theatre in 
this city will shortly have opposition 
through its former manager, W. W. Free- 
man. Mr. Freeman has leased a store six 
doors west of the Haymarket and will 
conduct it for a museum and vaudeville. 

The place will have a capacity of about 
800, and while it is not considered that 
the opposition will be aggressive, it will 
hurt some. 

Mr. Freeman is now in New York. It 
is understood here that a proposition in- 
volving some detail of the New York Hip- 
podrome management has been submitted 
to him. 



EASTERN WHEEL HAS MURRAY 

HILL. 

The Eastern Burlesque Wheel has se- 
cured the lease of the Murray Hill The- 
atre through either the Columbian Amuse- 
ment Company or a "dummy." It will be 
one of the three New York houses the 
Eastern clan has decided to gather to- 
gether to orTstand the departure of the 
same number of the Sullivan & Kraus 
houses from its ranks. 



KOHL & CASTLE CAN'T DECIDE. 

Chicago, June 15. 
It appears that Kohl & Castle are in 
doubt as to the policy most profitable for 
the Chicago Opera House next season. 
After announcing the return to vaude- 
ville another statement in favor of mu- 
sical comedy stock was made. "The Three 
C« races" at the Opera House close this 
week and will be succeeded by the George 
Musgrave's company, to be followed by 
revivals of musical comedies by another 
company. In all probability the manage- 
ment will conclude to run vaudeville before 
the fall season opens. 



TALKING YET ABOUT N. Y. THEATRE. 

The reports that the New York Theatre 
will be a Keitb -Proctor vaudeville house 
next season will not down. It is said 
that the bookings placed for the Grand 
Opera House next season are virtually 
those which would have been booked for 
the New York if that house were to re- 
main under the Klaw A Erlanger direc- 
tion. 



PHILADELPHIA BUSY. 

Philadelphia, June 15. 
According to present plans there will be 
plenty going on in the theatre building 
line in Philadelphia during the next year. 
In addition to the theatre and roof gar- 
den to be erected alongside the Lyric, the 
Syndicate is to have a new house on the 
corner of Broad and Sansom streets, to 
be a model of the new Nixon Theatre in 
Pittsburg. G. A. Wegefarth, who haa had 
the Grand Opera House for several sea- 
sons, has let the contract for his new 
playhouse in West Philadelphia, the con- 
tract price being $500,000. The new house 
is to be called the William Penn and it 
is planned to open it before the close of 
next season. Plans are being prepared for 
the erection of n Yiddish theatre in the 
downtown section of the city. TTie seat- 
ing capacity will be 1,600. There will be 
a stage 36 by 60 feet and the house will 
have all modern improvements. It will 
open late in the fall. The new German 
Theatre is almost finished and will open 
early next season. It is reported that this 
city is to have a new vaudeville theatre 
and the property at Eighth and Chestnut 
streets, formerly occupied by Sharpless 
Brothers as a department store ia to be 
the site. Negotiations are said to be under 
way for the purchase of this site. 



THOMPSON AND DUNDY IN CHICAGO. 

After carefully considering the prospects 
for success of a large amusement feature 
in Chicago to be run on the music hall 
order Thompson and Dundy, the former 
managers of the Hippodrome, have about 
decided to go into that town. Plans have 
progressed so far that arrangements for 
booking through the office of William Mor 
ris have been made. 

The firm expects to build and will have 
the house ready to open by the early 
spring. The stage will allow of ballets 
and large spectacular numbers, but the 
policy in general to be followed will be 
that of a thorough music hall playing only 
the best native and foreign acts. 



LUESCHER HAS CHESTNUT STREET. 

A rumor was started during the week 
that Mark A. Luescher had not the lease 
for the Chestnut Street Theatre in Phila- 
delphia. 

Mr. Luescher when seen regarding the 
question stated that he has the house and 
will take possession either October or De- 
cember 1 next, the present lessee having 
a provisional lease upon the premises de- 
|>endent upon the completion of the new 
lldwin Forrest Theatre, but must vacate 
the Chestnut Street by December 1 at 
the latest. 



WILLIAMS LOOKS WASHINGTON 
OVER. 

Washington, D. C, June 15. 
Percy G. Williams, the New York vaude 
ville manager, with his family was in the 
city during the week, and while here 
looked the town over. About the only 
available theatre now built is the Colum- 
bia. Mr. Williams kept whatever inten 
tions he mav have had to himself. 



No more vaudeville for Virginia Ains- 
worth. She has a cosy berth as a princi- 
pal with a company playing a revival of 
"Florodora." 



AIMEE ANGELES WILL RETURN. 

Tf time is secured for Aimee Angeles 
the mimic will return to vaudeville again 
during the summer, her previous trip hav- 
ing proved agreeable. 






VARIETY 



WR1ETY 

A Variety Paper for Variety People. 

Published every .Saturday by 

THB VARIETY POBU8IINO CO. 

Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 

1402 Hrowdway, N«>w York City. 

Telephone 18117— 38th St. 



8IME J. SILVERMAN, 
Editor and Proprietor. 



Entered as necondclaas matter December 
22, 190£, at the post office at New York, N. Y., 
under the act of Congress of March 3. 1879. 



CHICAGO OFFICE, 

79 S. Clark St. 

FRANK WIE8BER0, Representative. 

LONDON OFFICE, 

48 Cranbourne St. 

MISS JENIE JACOBS, Representative. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 

15 cent* an agate line. $2.10 an inch. One 
page, |100; one-half page, $50; one-quarter page, 
♦25. 

Charge for portraits furnished ou application. 

Special rate by the month for professional card 
under beading, "Representative Artists." 

- 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Annual $2 

Foreign 3 

Six and three mouths in proportion. 
Single copies five cents. 

Variety will be mailed to a permanent address 
or as per route as desired. 

Make all remittances payable to Variety Publish- 
ing Co. 

Copyright, 1906, by Variety Publishing Co. 

Vel 111. No. 1. 



VARIETY announces "fairness" as the 
policy governing it. 

It is conducted on original lines for a 
theatrical newspaper. Whatever there is 
to be printed of interest to the profes- 
sional world will be printed without re- 
gard to whose name is mentioned or the 
advertising columns. 

"All the news all the time" and "ab- 
solutely fair" are the watchwords. 

The reviews are written in a strictly 
impartial manner and for the benefit of 
the artists. 

VARIETY is an artist's paper, for the 
artists and to which any artist may come 
with a just grievance. 

VARIETY will not burden its columns 
with "wash" notices; it will not be in- 
fluenced by advertising; it will be honest 
from the first page to the last. 



Charles l^cotiard Fletcher sailed on Fri- 
day for Europe, where he has eighteen 



months bookings. 



Percy Q. Williams has settled out of 
town for the summer. He will run in 
every few days. 



The regular summer vaudeville season 
opens at Brighton Beach to-morrow (Sun- 
day) afternoon. 



II. II. Feiber, the Keith foreign booking 
agent, sailed yesterday (Friday) on the 
Celtic for London. 



IXin McAvoy drove through Broadway 
this week for the first time since his re- 
<*ent serious illness. 



Leo Oarrillo, Variety's cartoonist, will 
sail for England in August, opening at 
the Empire, London. 



Wash Martin, formerly of Carr's "Thor- 
oughbreds," will go with the "London 
(Jaiety Oirls" next season. 



The Stein -Erretto troupe of acrobats ar- 
rived this week and will open on the 
New York Roof Monday night. 



Harry Cilfoil has been offered thirty- 
five weeks booking by the Keith Agency 
at a cut of $100 on his salary. 



Harry Cooper, the comedian of the Em- 
pire City Quartet, may do a single turu 
this summer. Time has been offered. 



Arthur Prince, the English ventrilo- 
quist, will arrive here around July 1, pre- 
paratory to opening on Hammersteiifs 
Roof. 



When "Levinsky and His Models," Jules 
Ruby's latest act, publicly appears, Will 
11. Cohan, the Hebrew impersonator, will 
play Levinsky. 



The headquarters of John T. Fynes, the 
general press representative for the 
Keith-Proctor firm, are at the Fifth Ave- 
nue Theatre. • — 



Alex. Steiner has booked Ferry Convey, 
the musical clown, for six weeks at the 
Berlin Wintergarten, beginning in Au- 
gust. Mr. Convey will return here in the 
fall. 



"The Six Mowatts" is the new name. 
Formerly they were marked on the pro- 
gram as "The Five Mowatts," but lately 
have added unto themselves another mem- 
ber. 



The Miner burlesque shows have been 
fully recruited for next season, and Tom 
Miner left for Maine this week to dally 
away a vacation. His brother Eddie 
left town last week. 



During July Nella Bergen will play 
vaudeville for about three weeks. Miss 
Bergen will resume her prominent posi- 
tion in "The Free Lance" at the opening, 
of next season. 



Sam Meyers, formerly with Al H. Woods, 
has resigned to accept the position of 
general manager with Wilbur & Vincent. 
Last week Variety printed the reverse 
j< bout Mr. Meyers. 



When Junie McCree and his sketch 
'The Dope Fiend" open in Chicago on 
July 2 Bessie Moulton will play the part 
of the maid. Mr. McCree is booked over 
the entire Western time. 



Hurtig & Seamon will book the vaude- 
ville shows to be given during the sum- 
mer at each week's end up in Sullivan 
County at Sidney S'charlin's theatre lo- 
cated at Mountaindale. 



Lily Langtry's tour of America — or 
rather New York City -begins October 1. 
She plays seven weeks with Mr. Proctor 
and three with Percy Williams. She is 
to receive $2,500 per week. 



After a season as business manager of 
"The Jolly Grass Widows" Harry Rose 
will assume the same position with "The 
Parisian Star Show Girls" for next sea- 
son. Mr. Rose's wife will also be in the 
company. 



The Bessie Valdare Troupe of bicycle 
riders has received such a Mattering offer 
from an Eastern Burlesque Wheel organi- 
zation that it will probably play over that 
burlesque circuit next season. 



After contemplating vaudeville serious- 
ly Sylvia Lynden has changed her mind, 
the opportunity of playing Maxine El- 
liott's former part in "Her Own Way" 
during next season proving too tempting. 



Snyder and Buckley will play a whole 
summer date at their cottage in Rockaway 
commencing next week, returning to vaude- 
ville with a new act on September 3, hav- 
ing been booked continuously from then 
until June, 1007. 



Variety's correspondent at Baltimore 
gave Fields and Wolley the credit of doing 
a Hebrew specialty last week in his com- 
ment on the bill at Electric Park in that 
city. As the team gives attention to Ger- 
man only, evidently an error was made. 



There is apt to be a mix-up in tie; 
mail of the Howard Brothers, banjoists, 
and Howard and Howard, Hebrew im- 
personators. Both teams have been 
signed by Hurtig and Seamon for their 
"Transatlantiques" organization for next 
season. 



Lambert and Pierce, known as "the two 
men in black," will shortly dissolve part- 
nership. Mr. Lambert will play there- 
after with his wife under the team title 
of Lambert and Williams. 



John Considine, of the Hotel Metropole, 
has a safe full of money collected for 
boxes and tickets for the George Fuller 
Golden benefit. He sold boxes to Eddie 
Burke, Leo Mayer and a number of other 
"bookies" who frequent the Metropole at 
$100 apiece. 



Harry Murtha, formerly resident man- 
ager of the Amphion for William T. 
Crover, is to have charge of the Brooklyn 
manager's summer venture in Brighton 
Beach. In addition to managing the 
vaudeville theatre these, Mr. Murtha is 
also interested in "The Canals of Venice" 
at Dreamland. 



Loui.se Allen Collier has been offered a 
place with the Joe Weber company for 
next season, but not until they put on 
the new piece some time in November. 
Mrs. Collier is aX present engaged in 
booking a vaudeville tour, and if this 
pans out as well as she hopes she will 
decline the Weber proffer. 



During the week that Woodward's Seals 
played Hammerstein's Roof, one of the 
stage hands became somewhat careless 
as to his style of language. Mr. Wood 
ward, who is very devout, cautioned the 
young man, saying, "Please be careful. 
My seals are not accustomed to that kind 
of talk." 



Jordan and Harvey, an American team 
of Hebrew comedians who have been in 
Europe for four years past, have written 
that they will sail for this side July 13. 
They will remain over here only four 
weeks, immediately returning to Europe. 

* 

Myers & Keller will book their short 
time. 



Fred and Annie Pelot were obliged to 
leave for their home in Peoria, III., on 
Ihursday of last week, owing to the seri- 
ous illness of Mrs. Pelot's father and sis- 
ter. Her father hats recovered, but the 
sister is not expected to live. Mrs. Pelot's 
oldest sister died last month. 



The Zingari troupe of singers and 
dancers will open at Henderson's, Coney 
Island, on July 2. This troupe is an en 
large men t. of the Zingari trio and will 
consist of eight people. The offering will 
be called "Life in a Gypsy Camp." Alex 
ander Bevan is the producer, while 
George Homans will have the direction of 
the act. 



Charles J. Burkhardt, principal com- 
edian last season with "The Jolly Grass 
Widows," has been signed for "Miss New 
York, Jr.," of which I. H. Herk is to be 
manager. Mr. Burkhardt was to have 
been featured with a forthcoming musical 
comedy, but decided to go with the bur- 
lesque organization which is scheduled to 
go over the Empire Circuit (Western 
Burlesque Wheel). 



Tom O'Brien, of O'Brien & Havel, proved 
himself a hero one day last week He 
was on the bill at Proctor's in Albany, 
following Ned Wayburn's "Rain-lVars," 
when one of the electrical effects of the 
preceding act became short circuited, 
causing a tiny blaze. The audience rose 
to its feet and O'Brien promptly started 
in with an impromptu monologue, ef- 
fectually reassuring the house an I avert- 
ing a panic. 



Oscar Hammerstein stood in the lobby of 
his Victoria Theatre, on Tuesday evening, 
complacently viewing the surging crowd 
that besieged his box office. "Just think 
of it," he suddenly remarked, "in 187o I 
had already accumulated enough money on 
which to retire. 1 wonder what I would 
now be doing if I had dropped out of the 
struggle at that time?" Prtaeed as to 
the amount of money he was then worth, 
he replied: "Oh, about. $40,<HM» and I was 
considered very comfortably fixed in those 
days." 

A friend of George W. I^derer's recently 
sought that manager and told him he 
was about to depart for New Orleans, re- 
questing some letters of introduction to 
Lederer'l friends in the Southern city. 
Lederer gave him two, one to Col. Will- 
iam Rowlei and the other to Dominick 
O'Malley. On his arrival in the South 
the holder of the letters sought the two 
men to whom they wen* addressed and 
found one in jail and the other in an 
insane asylum. You can't make him l>c- 
lieve that Lederer didn't "job" him. 



Herrmann "the Great is touring through 
Canada. He will play Quebec, London, 
Hamilton and Montreal, closing the season 
at the Theatre Francais in the latter 
place. Next season Herrmann will Im- 
port a cousin from the other side, his ex- 
act counterpart in looks as the present 
Herrmann is of his late uncle, the original. 
The newcomer will be taught the myste- 
ries of the inner circle "f magicians in 
order that he may be fitted to become the 
Future "Herrmann the Great." 









VARIETY 



THOMPSON AND DUNDY LEAVE THE 
HIPPODROME. 

The announcement last week of the 
severance of business relations between 
Thompson and Dundy a ml the Hippo- 
drome (Company was merely the con- 
firmation of the news columns of Variety 
three montbs back. 

The strained relations between Thomp- 
son and Dundy and the John W. Gates- 
Frank S. Black contingent were thorough- 
ly ventilated at that early date through 
the columns of this paper, and its readers 
were in possession of the facts. 

The troubles then existing were later 
augmented by the managers leasing 
Paradise l»ark at Fort George. A clause 
in Thompson and Dundy's contract with 
the Hippodrome people forbade them from 
engaging in any other amusement enter- 
prise on Manhattan Island, and when it 
appeared likely to the Hippodrome di- 
rectors that the Fort George scheme might 
develop into one of magnitude, the let- 
ter of agreement was insisted upon, 
which culminated into an open rupture. 

The Hippodrome will hereafter In* di- 
vided into departments, each of which 
will have its distinct head. 

The amphitheatre will reopen in Au- 
gust with a revival of "A Society Cir- 
cus" instead of a new production. If 
•John Ringling, the circus man, can be 
induced to accept the management, he 
will be given it, but it is probable that 
in any case the Ringing Circus will show 
in the Hippodrome next spring. 

Thompson and Dundy before they left 
were offered the house on any terms that 
would allow the stockholders to depart 
whole in pocket, but the firm declined. 

Everyone connected with the manage- 
ment had become dissatisfied with the 
condition of affairs, and the dissatisfac- 
tion reached its limit during the Bar- 
nu in -Bailey engagement at Madison 
Square Garden. To offset the effect of 
the circus the Hippodrome started an ad- 
vertising campaign costing $36,000, which 
only served to advertise Barnum-Bailey. 

James A. Bailey at that time held a 
'cabinet" meeting to consider whether it 
would be worth while to "go back" at 
the Hippodrome through the same means, 
the latter place styling itself "The Great- 
est Show on Earth" rankling in the late 
showman's pride, but the consultation re- 
sulted in no action being taken. 



"THE UMPIRE" COMING. 

Harry Askin, long associated with the 
management of prominent amusement en- 
terprises, is to make a bid for New York 
favor on his own account in the early 
future. He has purchased the rights in a 
musical piece of Joseph Howard called 
"The Umpire" and has already arranged 
for its opening here. "The Umpire" had a 
very long and profitable run in the West- 
ern metropolis, and although that doesn't 
always count for a very great deal it is 
considered a favorable omen. 



PROCTOR SUED. 

F. F. Proctor, the manager who is now 
a member of the Keith-Proctor corpora- 
tion, has been sued by James E. Sullivan, 
the actor, for $1,200 for breach of con- 
tract, arising out of Mr. Proctor's cancella- 
tion of contracts given by him to Mr. 
Sullivan. Another suit has been begun 
to lecovcr a week's salary from Mr. Proe 
tor by Mabel llite and Walter Jones, who 
were cancelled. 



FYNES AFTER BROOKLYN. 

According to a Brooklyn real estate 
agent, J. Austin Fynes, now much inter- 
ested in theatricals from a speculative 
end, is considering the advisability of en- 
tering Brooklyn as a manager. 

The agent says that Mr. Fynes ex- 
pressed himself as of the opinion that the 
psychological moment had arrived for in- 
vading Brooklyn, and he (Fynes) wanted 
to be the invader. Two sites around Ful- 
ton street and Flatbush avenue . were 
looked over, without an immediate de- 
cision being reached. 



PITTSBURG HAY HAVE TWO HOUSES. 

Pittsburg, June 15. 

It would not excite surprise here if 
a vaudeville theatre in opposition to 
Harry Davis' Grand Opera House loomed 
up in the future. 

Although there appears no available 
theatre on the horizon at the present mo- 
ment, the Belasco may become the com- 
petitor. The managers of that house, 
the Shuberts, were offered the manage- 
ment of a new house to be built here by 
a group of Pittsburg capitalists some time 
ago, and the general understanding is 
that they have decided to accept the 
offer. 

Provided the Shubert firm does, it will 
leave the Belasco on the market. 



BLONDELL WILL BE A MANAGER. 

Ed Blondell, who through a long and 
successful career as a vaudeville artist 
has accumulated a considerable fortune, 
according to latest report, is looking for 
an opportunity to invest his surplus in 
one or two vaudeville theatres. Mr. 
Blondell up to date has made no effort to 
get a look-in on any of the New York 
theatrical ventures, but has confined his 
observations to the out-of-town field. 



MYERS LOOKING AT PHILADELPHIA. 

The manager of the Doric circuit, Henry 
Myers, has under way a scheme to place 
vaudeville on a roof garden in Philadel- 
phia. It may not mature for some time, 
but Mr. Myers has the option on the roof 
of what is going to be the tallest building 
in the Quaker town. 



OPENING SET FOR ST. PAUL. 

St. Paul, June 15. 
The opening date for the new Orpheum 
Theatre, now building here, haa been set 
for August 12. The Orpheum Theatre in 
Minneapolis will commence its third sea- 
son at the same time. Jules Bistes, local 
manager for the Orpheum in Salt Lake 
City, is acting as superintendent of con- 
struction for the St. Paul house. 



CAJPT OPEN MASONIC ROOF. 

Chicago, June 15. 
There has been some talk of reopening 
the Masonic Temple Roof Theatre this 
summer, but the proposition is not likely 
to materialize on account of the stringent 
rules governing theatres above street level. 
The Roof has been closed since the Iro- 
quois fire and was at that time running 
vaudeville under the management of J. J. 
Murdock. 



WHITE RATS ELECT TO-MORROW. 

The election for a president of the White 
Kits for the ensuing year takes place 
to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon in the club 
rooms of the society at the Saranac Hotel. 



MARIE LLOYD COMING. 

Encouraged by the cordial reception ac- 
• orded Vesta Tilley and Vesta Victoria, 
Marie Lloyd has been prevailed upon to 
visit these shores next season, playing 
the Williams and llammerstein houses. 
The smart set that frequented the Ros- 
ter & Bial establishment in its heyday 
will be pleased to hear the news. Miss 
Lloyd has the reputation of singing the 
"questionable" songs with more delicacy 
and finesse than any English artiste that 
has ever visited America. 



AGENCIES MERGE. 

(Chicago, June 15. 

A transaction of more than ordinary 
interest to managers and artists occurred 
here when the Barnes Western Theatri-' 
cal Exchange absorbed the Henderson 
Theatrical Agency, carrying with it all 
the theatres, parks and attractions booked 
by the Henderson people, including 240 
fairs. The Barnes Exchange was recent- 
ly reorganized and incorporated by F. M. 
!>ames and Robert Fulgora. 

According to the arrangements, Mr. Hen- 
derson will have the position of general 
booking manager. His late booking agent, 
Charles Don trick, will be assistant man- 
ager. 

A suite of ten rooms in the Chicago 
Opera House block will be occupied by 
the firm. 



KEITH WANTED J. AUSTIN BADLY. 

The title or position of general man- 
ager of the Keith-Proetor-Western Vaude- 
ville Association did not appeal to J. Aus- 
tin Fynes when B. F. Keith made the pro- 
posal direct to Mr. Fynes that he accept 
the position. 

The former vaudeville manager stated 
to Mr. Keith that he did not care to 
serve any master hereafter other than 
himself. A taste of liberty had become 
a habit, and Mr. Fynes gracefully de- 
clined the honored position without in- 
quiring as to the future status of E. F. 
Albee in the event that he should accept. 



"THEY'RE OFF M AT BINGHAMTON. 

Binghamton, N. Y., June 15. 

A vaudeville fight is in prospect in this 
town with the reopening of the season in 
September. J. P. E. Clarke, general man- 
ager of the local street railroads, has for 
a long time held undisputed sway over the 
variety destinies here. Weber & Rush 
grabbed off The Old Armory and are 
turning it into a vaudeville theatre to 
be booked through William Morris. 

Now Dictator Clarke, who controls the 
Stone Opera House, has announced his in- 
tention of reopening the Bijou. The fact 
that Keith will book the new house brings 
the coming fight into the present vaude- 
ville situation. 



FRED WALTON'S SHOW GOING OUT. 

Commencing Monday at the Opera 
House in Hartford, Conn., the new Fred 
Walton show will hold the stage. There 
are eight numbers on the bill, inclusive of 
Mr. Walton and company, George and 
Harrington, Lo-Qua, Frank Mayne and 
Company, Mattie Lockett, Roland West, J. 
Francis Dooley and the Kratons. 

The following week Mr. Walton will ap- 
pear at the Brighton Beach Music Hall, 
but whether with his company as now 
constituted is not known. 



WILL SHUBERTS HAVE FIFTH 

AVENUE? 

Although no one could figure out the 
combination satisfactorily, the rumor 
mongers had it during the week that the 
Shubert Brothers would come into the 
possession of Proctor's Fifth Avenue 
Theatre on May 1, 1907, when the present 
Proctor lease expires by virtue of the 
notice delivered to the tenant when J. 
Austin Fynes acquired the property at 
public sale. 



GEO. FULLER GOLDEN'S BENEFIT. 

At the New York Theatre to-morrow 
night the friends of George Fuller Golden 
will assemble before and behind the foot- 
lights for the purpose of tendering the 
former "Big Chief" of the White Rats a 
howling testimonial. 



MARINELLI MAY INCORPORATE. 

The incorporation of the international 
booking agency of H. B. Marinelli is un- 
der consideration by the head of the 
agency. 

Mr. Marinelli has been in receipt of 
many requests from foreign managers to 
turn his agency into a co-operative con- 
cern and it is possible that he may decide 
to do so. 



HITCHCOCK RECEIVES TEMPTING 
OFFER. 

Lew Fields is reported to have offered 
Raymond Hitchcock a permanent place in 
his company for next season at a sal- 
ary of $2,000 a week. The returns are 
not yet all in, but Mr. Hitchcock goes 
about these days with an absorbed and 
calculating expression, as one whose mind 
is ^occupied with the constant juggling 
of many figures. 



FISCHER WILL BOOK FOR THE HIPPO- 
DROME. 

A contract is on the point of being 
closed under which Clifford C. Fischer will 
become the exclusive booking agent for the 
New York Hippodrome. Mr. Fischer will 
sail for the other side shortly in quest 
of new and novel material. 



THE COMEDY CLUB. 

No information as to the progress of 
the Comedy Club, the new vaudeville 
artists' organisation, has been given out 
this week. 

A meeting was held last Sunday when 
it was decided that meeting rooms should 
be procured. 



CORBETT GOING STARRING. 

"The Burglar and the Lady" will be the 
title of the play James J. Corbett will star 
in next season under the direction of Mit- 
tenthal Brothers. Corbett will essay the 
role of a ''Raffles." 



The trial of Fougere, the French singer, 
for shoplifting will take place about July 
1H at the Summer Sessions for the trial 
of criminal cases in London. 



LONG WAIT IN FRISCO. 

San Francisco, June 15. 
Work has not yet begun on the new 
Orpheum Theatre here and the prospects 
are that it won't be ready for a year. 
Business at the temporary Orpheum (The 
Chutes) has been far from satisfactory, 
the only good houses being Sunday after- 
noons and evenings. 



VARIETY 



LEO CARRILLO'S CARTOON OF THE WEEK. 

J 




VAUDEVILLE IN FIFTH AVENUE. 

First-class vaudeville will occupy the 
attention of the patrons of Proctor's Fifth 
Avenue Theatre next season, the policy of 
stock being discontinued. 

The same conditions will reverse them- 
selves at the Twenty-third street house, 
where stock may replace vaudeville. 



LEUSCHER INTERESTED WITH LEE. 

Mark A. Leuscher, the former general 
manager for F. F. Proctox, has secured 
an interest with Henry Lee the imper- 
sonator in "San Francisco," the new 
spectacle which is scheduled to open this 
afternoon on the site in Dreamland, 
Coney Island, formerly occupied by 
"Fighting the Flames." The production 
was planned by Mr. Lee, and built under 
his personal direction. Five hundred 
people will be used in the pantomime, 
for which Lawrence Marston, who put on 
the original production of "Hen Hur," is 
stage manager. Henry Myers, the vaude- 
ville manager, has an interest in the 
venture also. 



LASKY CHANGES HIS MIND. 

Although fully intended a few weeks 
ago to leave for Europe to place the new 
acts of his firm, Lasky, Rolfe & C<o., Jesse 
L. Lasky has decided there is no neces- 
sity for that at the present time .^ will 
remain at home, reserving the soa./oy- 
age for a more leisurely time. 



The Duffin-Redcay Troupe has cancelled 
its European time. 



NEW EMPIRE IN JOHANNESBURG 

OPENS. 

Johannesburg, May 15. 

The new Empire Palace of Varieties, the 
finest place of amusement in South Africa, 
opened here last evening. It replaces the 
old Empire which was opened in Decem- 
ber, 18<M. 

The new theatre contains 18 boxes, 375 
fauteuils, orchestra stalls and stalls on 
the ground floor; 250 dress circle and bal- 
cony stalls on the first floor and space for 
300 in the gallery. 

The decorations are in green and gold 
and the general color scheme is the same, 
extending to the furnishings. There are 
1,000 electric lights and ten exits. 

All the latest improvements known la 
theatre building have been installed. 

An entire new company marked the be- 
ginning of the new theatre's career. The 
most prominent was Ada Reeve, the Eng- 
lish artiste. There were the Hounding 
Pattersons, John E. Coyle, the Strolling 
Players, Kitty Tims, Cora Corina, the Pic- 
qu*vt, DeWitt, Bums and Torrence, Fred 
Land and Stuart, "The Male Patti." 

With the exception of two and one-half 
years during the course of the late war 
when the Empire was closed by order of 
the government it has l>een opened con- 
tinuously since 1804. 

The directors of the Empires Theatres 
Co.. Ltd., owners of the building, are 
Messrs. Edgar M. Hyman, I. Rosenthal 
and Aubrey Hyman. Herbert Hyman and 
Julius Rosenthal are also connected. 



SHAYNE IN THE WEST. 

Eddie Shayne left New York about a 
week ago for a trip through the West. He 
will travel as far as St. Louis, where 
a site awaits his favorable say so for a 
vaudeville theatre to be erected upon it, 
it is understood. 

Mr. Shayne may be absent a week or 
more longer. It is reported that his trip 
will in part at least be devoted to the 
interests of the William Morris office. 



PARADE NOT EXCITING. 

Pawnee Bill's Wild West Show paraded 
through Broadway on Wednesday even- 
ing without disturbing the. tranquillity of 
1 hat thoroughfare. The procession was 
strung out by bronchos walking in single 
file. A single line of sightseers along 
each curb listlessly looked on. 



NO TENT SHOW IN BRONX. 

After laying out about $3,000 in ex- 
pectation that he would give a vaudeville 
show under canvas in the Bronx, George 
Dunbar, who had the affair in charge, dis- 
covered ho could not procure a license. 

No reason existed for the refusal as far 
as Mr. Dunbar could ascertain, although 
the roof garden on the Metropolis Theatre 
under the management of Hurtig &, Sea- 
nion in the same district may have ex- 
erted a political influence sufficient to viti- 
ate Mr.. Dunbar's application. 



RITCHIE REMAINS WITH KARN0. 

After having a play for next season 
built around Billie Ritchie, the "drunk" 
of Karno's Mumming Birds, and having 
the "paper" on hand, it is announced 
that Mr. Ritchie will not go with Gus 
Hill, after all. Mr. Hill had prepared 
himself for a season's comedy conquest 
with the acrobatic comedian, but may 
acquire a brother of Ritchie's now in 
England for the part and save the play 
and "paper." 



MUSIC PUBLISHERS UNEASY. 

The music publishers of this community 
are in a state of panic, due to the unprece- 
dented duluess of trade at the present 
time. So bad indeed in the business that 
it Is doubtful if any but the larger one* 
survive at all, and even some of these are 
far from being in a complacent mood. 
With hardly an exception every house is 
cutting its expenses, some to such an ex- 
tent as to indicate that there is little or 
no available cash. Two of the uptown 
music publishers will probably retire from 
that line in the immediate future, one 
jH>ssibly going into the bench of a receiver. 
One of the largest of the firms in this line 
is making jwirt payment son its current bills 
and it looks at this writing as though 
there will l>e a few lofts to let before the 
cold weather comes round. 



Richard Fitrot, the foreign agent, will 
leave for abroad some time in July. 



Newell and Niblo sail for South Africa 
.Inly 17. 









VARIETY 



COOPER, KENDIS & PALEY. 

Either Bert Cooper considers himself 
lucky for having been born or he is not 
superstitious, for on June 13, which was 
also his birthday, the newly formed mu- 
sical publishing firm of Cooper, Kendis & 
Paley opened offices at 110 West Fortieth 
street. 

All the members of the firm are well 
and popularly known and liked in and 
out of the profession. There were "great 
doings" on the first performance of the 
"new act/' and the festivities extended 
into the night until the janitor called 
the crowd down into the street, pointing 
at the town clock, which showed Mr. 
Cooper's birthday had passed away. 

Several musical numbers with catchy 
melodies are in the possession of the firm 
and everything augurs well for its success. 



NEW PLAY FOR DE VRIES. 

Lee Arthur is now hard at work on the 
new comedy-drama to be used as the star- 
ring vehicie for Henri De Vries next sea- 
son. The Dutch protean actor will be 
under the management of Leander Sire and 
overtures were made to Charles Klein to 
write the play. Klein, wh# is an abject 
worshipper at the shrine of Christian Sci- 
ence, suggested a substantial advance pay- 
ment, and when it was not forthcoming 
found himself entirely too much occupied 
to undertake the task of furnishing the 
piece. fThe scheme of the play, asat present 
outlined, is to nave it very much on the 
lines of "The Music Master," devoting the 
entire third act to the protean exhibitions 
of the star. 



WHITAKER & SCHILLER. BROAD- 
ENING. 

The Jersey firm of Whitaker & 
Schiller will operate quite extensively the 
coming season. 

Other than the vaudeville theatre they 
now operate in Bayonne, N. J., another 
house of the same character will be 
erected by the firm in either Plainfield 
or New Brunswick. 

A travelling vaudeville show to play 
the combination houses will also be under 
their management. The feature of the 
touring bill will be the Andres, a 
"thought-transmission" couple on the 
style of the Fays, to whom it is said they 
are vastly superior. 

TAKES NO CHANCES. 

The booking agents who have been in 
the habit of transacting tlieir business di- 
rect with S. K. Hodgdon have been for- 
bidden to invade the inner sanctum of the 
KeithAgency in the future. Hereafter they 
must submit their wares to P. K. Nash or 
1>. F. Hennessy In the outer room and 
await the verdict just (he same as the 
artists. 



FADETTES CONSULT A LAWYER. 

Boston, Mass., June 15. 
There is some trouble brewing between 
the orchestra known as the Fadcttes and 
the Keith management. The orchestra is 
now playing Keith's Boston theatre, and 
during the week the manager <>f the or- 
chestra consulted an attorney, who started 
an investigation into the previous prices 
paid the Fadettes by other managers. The 
Fadettes have always been considered a 
Keith act and the difference probably 
arises through a division of money. 



LITTLE EGYPT HAS REFORMED. 

O say! Here comes Little Egypt 
agaiu! Yes, the original little one of 
the naughty dance and the Seeley dinner. 
And all sorts of trouble came in her wake. 
William Schmidt, of St. Anns avenue, 
the Bronx, is being sued by a firm of 
vaudeville agents for the "Little One's" 
salary for one appearance. Herman L. 
Kothe is counsel for the plaintiffs. 

The complaint in the action sets forth 
that Schmidt acted foi the Hunter Club, 
a Bronx social organization, in hiring 
vaudeville talent for a smoker to be held 
last week in a hall at 132d street and 
Madison avenue run by one Henry Rosen- 
berg. Little Egypt was to be the feat- 
ure of the show. 

Egypt was tipped off that the Hunters 
took their entertainment with tabasco 
trimmings and she could go as far as 
she liked. If she went far enough she 
could have a bonus is the reported bait 
held out by the Hunters' representative. 
Little Egypt, having apparently seen the 
error of her ways, indignantly refused. 
There was some polite wrangling, ending 
in the refusal of the party of the first 
part to pay the dancer for her services 
it is alleged. 



MUSICAL LEADERS ORGANIZE. 

The musical directors of the theatrical 
companies have organized themselves into 
a social society called "The Wanderers." 

Sebastian Hiller is president, Eugene 
Speyer vice-president, and Frank Saddler, 
Leon M. Polecheck and Joe Nathan secre- 
taries. A board of trustees has been 
elected and Hans Albrecht, Louis Leonre 
and Al Henderson will serve for the first 
term. The meeting rooms are at Lyric 
Hall. 

The objects of the society are purely so- 
cial, but the scope may be enlarged to in- 
clude the leaders of the theatrical or- 
chestras who are not at present permitted 
to join. 



SOME FOREIGNERS. 

Among the vaudeville arrivals from 
Europe this week were Spadoni, who ap- 
pears at Proctor's Twenty-third Street 
week after next; the Great Albas, booked 
twelve weeks over the Ingersoll parks, and 
a German comedy team named Work and 
Over, who are to appear on the New 
York Roof. The feature of the Albas' act 
is a slide across a sixty-foot wire which 
is twenty-five feet high, during which the 
performer stands upon his head entirely 
unsupported. 



ELTINGE IN DEMAND ABROAD. 

Julian Eltinge, now playing in distant 
London, has been offered twenty-eight 
weeks on the Moss-Stoll tour of the Eng- 
lish provinces, but declined the time to 
take up his contract with Klaw & Er- 
langer next season. Eltinge will play 
Paris and Berlin, returning to this coun- 
try in September. It is probable that he 
will go back to England later to take the 
foreign time when his American engage- 
ments have been filled. 



PRINCESS PAULINE AT PASTOR'S. 

On Monday at Pastor's Fourteenth 
Street Theatre will appear the Princess 
Pauline, an English comedienne and sing- 
er. The Princess will play two weeks. 
and possibly the Pastor engagement may 
be indefinite. 



KEITH AND THE NEW LICENSE LAW. 

Up to date the Keith Booking Agency 
has failed to show a disposition to come 
in under the new Employment Agency 
Law which went into effect on the first of 
this month, by filing application for li- 
cense and by giving the required bond. 

The Theatrical Agents' Society of New 
York has indirectly declared its intention 
of first approaching the Keith otnee po- 
litely and then, if they are still deter- 
mined to remain without the fold, to re- 
sort to sterner measures. 

In such case various complications may 
develop. It has been discovered that the 
portion of the amended law relating to the 
defining of the term "fee" would hardly 
stand a contest in the higher courts. 
Should the Keith people deem it worth 
an expensive fight, this section may be 
cast out as unconstitutional, and the 
Keith Agency might escape the general 
classification. 

The section defines "fee" as being not 
only a direct commission paid an agent, 
but also such margin of profit as may 
come to any person engaged ill putting on 
theatrical performances over and above 
the cost of such entertainment. This defi- 
nition might be construed to include any 
manager. 

The Keith Agency has always escaped 
the application of the Employment Agency 
law by the claim that it was an em- 
ployer and not an agent. 

The Agency informed the representative 
of the license bureau that it would give 
its decision as to taking out a license as 
soon as the "merger" had been perfected, 
which, they said, would occur in the im- 
mediate future. 



ROGERS BROTHERS SECURE WAY- 
BURN. 

Ned Wayburn has been engaged by the 
Rogers Brothers to stage their forth- 
coming production. His scheme to pro- 
duce a large number of vaudeville acts 
has not received the encouragement from 
the managers through present conditions 
and there may shortly be a readjustment 
of the personnel of the company bearing 
Wayburn's name. 



A FREAK ACT. 

T. W. Dinkins, the burlesque manager, 
has secured a novel act of which he ex- 
pects Jmuch. The basis of the specialty 
is a well-known bicycle racer who has 
won a championship of two and is willing 
for a proper consideration to pedal a few 
hundred yards or two submerged in a 
tank of water. Mr. Dinkins is preparing 
to book the feature. 



SPAETH WINS EXTRADITION CASE. 

Oolumbus, Ohio, June 15. 
Governor Pattison of Ohio has refused 
to honor the demand for the extradition 
to North Carolina of William T. Spaeth, 
the former treasurer of the Forepaugh- 
Sells circus, who is charged with having 
embezzled $30,000 from the show, and Mr. 
Spaeth is practically safe for the time 
being. 



BOOKING FOR PHILADELPHIA AND 
BOSTON. 

Time is now being booked through the 
Morris office for Williams' Orpheum The- 
atre in Boston and TTammerstein's Vic- 
toria Theatre in Philadelphia. 



WANT AN AUTO? 

If you want a neat, nice running, 
never-get-out-of-ordcr De Dion automo- 
bile for fifty cents, write or wire Jack 
Wilson, as per route. Or, if you don't 
care to wait for the length of time it 
would require an answer to be returned, 
drop into Myers & Keller and buy a 
ticket for the rattle which is to decide the 
winner. 

Mr. Wilson, who plays the chief role of 
Jack Wilson and company, purchased the 
machine, but finds it inconvenient to cart 
all over the country while working 
out his well filled route sheet. 

The tickets are fifty cents each and the 
date of the decision will be announced in 
the Morning Telegraph through an ad- 
vertisement. 



BECK "AUTOS" HOME." 

Chicago, June 15. 
Martin Beck and Morris Meyerfield, Jr., 
have returned from New York. Mr. Beck 
drove from Buffalo in his automobile, mak- 
ing a record run. He is an enthusiastic 
automobilist and recently ran his car to 
Milwaukee, a distance of eighty-five miles 
from Chicago, in two hours and ten min- 
utes. 



SOMETHING NEW PROMISED. 

"The Billposter" is the title of a new 
sketch to introduce Edwin Baker into 
vaudeville. Mr. Baker has been leading 
comedian in "The Tenderfoot" and "The 
Mayor of Tokio" for several seasons past, 
but has left the legitimate for vaudeville. 
"The Billposter" will introduce a new type 
to the footlights. 



EDDIE LEONARD WITH DOCKSTADER. 

Eddie Leonard has been signed by lieu 
Dockstader for two years for his minstrel 
aggregation. Eddie is bound hand and 
foot by a cast-iron contract and in ad- 
dition has furnished a bond for its ful- 
fillment. 



"THE BIG SCREAM" HERE. 

Barney Girard, "the big scream" and 
manager of Miner's "Bohemians" arrived 
in town this week, where he will remain 
until next season. 

At that time Mr. Girard will again 
pilot the Miner aggregation over the 
Western Burlesque Wheel. 



GUS HILL'S VARIOUS VENTURES. 

Gus Hill's plans for the coining season 
contemplate the sending out of eight at- 
tractions. They arc "Around the Clock," 
a pantomimic comedy; "Gay New Vork," 
"McFadden's Flute," "The Smart Set/' 
"Happy Hooligan" and the three burlesque 
shows, "Crackerjacks," "Vanity Fair" and 
"The Night Owls." 



MUST BE VALUABLE. 

Oscar Hammerstein was offered $8,<)<N) 
for the program privilege for his Manhat- 
tan Opera House for the first season by 
Frank V. Strauss. He refused the tender. 



ANOTHER PUBLISHING FIRM. 

Tin' Lew Dockstader Music Publishing 
Coin' any is the name of a new publishing 
fir . formed for the purpose of handling 
t' e songs to be used in the minstrel or- 
ganization. 



VARIETY 



FLYNN SUES A CHORUS GIRL. 

Lillian Barrington, a former member of 
the Joe Weber chorus, is made defendant 
in a suit brought by James D. Flynn, of 
the firm of Flynn & Wilson, to recover 
live weeks salary as press representative. 
The suit is based on this set of facts. 
Miss Barrington threatened to go into 
vaudeville and entered into an arrange- 
ment with Mr. Flynn to book her on a 
commission basis. Another agreement 
alleged was that the theatrical man was 
to act as her press agent. Mr. Flynn 
asserts that he discharged his duties for 
a period of five weeks, during which time 
and since the chorus maid has suffered 
complete paralysis of the particular wrist 
and arm muscles that work the purse 
strings, probably because the managers 
didn't want the corpyphee. 



DIDN'T WANT "K.-P." 

An unsuspecting actor who belonged to 
the Knights of Pythias and bore the in- 
signia of that order blazoned boldly on 
his coat lapel entered the outer office of 
the William Morris agency the otjier day. 
A wise office boy got a single flash at the 
gold pin in his coat and beating him to 
the gate glared at the letters "K. P." 

"Nix on you for the first floor of the 
Holland building," he observed with his 
hand on the lock. "Take a downtown 
Broadway car to Twenty-sixth street. 
You've got a nerve to come in here with 
the Keith-Proctor button on anyway." 



ADA REEVE BIG DRAWING CARD. 

The opening day of the Empire at Jo- 
hannesburg, South Africa, May 14, ushered 
in the first appearance in that country of 
Ada Reeve, the English comedienne. Miss 
Reeve is to receive $25,000 for her six 
weeks work under the Hyman manage- 
ment, two weeks of which she will play 
in Cape Town and the remainder in her 
opening city. 

As Miss Reeve loses three weeks travel- 
ing each way, her net salary will average 
about $2,000 weekly. The house for the 
first week sold out one hour after the 
box office opened. Prices were raised from 
$1.75 up to $6.25 during her engagement. 



NOW VAUDEVILLE GETS IT. 

Following the rage which the wild and 
woolly Western drama has enjoyed during 
the winter, Edward Esmond, who has for 
the past four years been the principal of 
a number of vaudeville sketches, will try 
out a new playlet during the summer in 
which the redskin is given the principal 
role. The new offering, which is de- 
scribed as having some dramatic force as 
well as comedy interest, is written by Si 
U. Collins, a former Detroit newspaper 
man. It will be sen in the theatres of 
the Keith-Proctor combine in the fall if 
all goes well. 



OUGHT TO BE ALL RIGHT. 

A "sister act" now in process of for- 
mation will l>e composed of Frederika 
Raymond, formerly Fairy Queen in the 
'•White Cat," and Ethel Gilmore, the late 
premiere danseuse of "Humpty Dumpty." 

'Hie girls will do a dancing and singing 
s|>ecialty, which combined with the 
comeliness their photographs display is 
expected to carry the team over the 
vaudeville circuits. The first booking has 
been arranged by Myers & Keller for 
Brighton Beach for the week of July 2. 



ARTISTS' FORUM 

Con fin* your totters to ISO words and wrtto on one tide of paper only. 
Anonymous communications will not bo printed. Name of writer must be signed and w ill b» 
held In strict confidence. If desired. 



Los Angeles, June 8. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir — To settle a rumor that has gained 
much circulation in the profession, I shall 
be obliged if you will kindly publish this 
letter to the effect that Billie Ritchie, "the 
drunk" of ''A Night in an English Music 
Hall," is not leaving the company, either 
to form his own or to join any other. This 
is positive. 

Also with regard to the statement as 
to other parties who have noted our suc- 
cess and are covetous, proceedings will be 
immediately taken directly any attempt 
is made to steal our act. As has been ad- 
vertised for weeks in your paper, "Mum- 
ming Birds" or "A Night in an English 
Music Hall" was produced by Mr. Fred 
Karno in London, and it is his sole prop- 
erty. We have won one case since our ar- 
rival in this country bearing on the rights 
to the same. Our booking here extends 
to May, 1907. Alf Reeves, 

Manager London Comedy Co. 



Omaha, Neb., June 7. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir — Enclosed find clipping from this 
week's issue of The Billboard. Kindly 
deny this statement in next week's paper. 
Also enclose you Mr. Kelley's letter, where 
he admits the performers received no sal- 
ary, and will try and secure same provid- 
ing we keep it from the papers. Also 
threatens us if we publish the truth. 
Kindly take this matter up immediately 
and deny The Billboard's article. We will 
if necessary make affidavit that we did not 
receive a cent, and not only lost our salary 
but railroad fare and board; in fact, we 
were compelled to pay our own car fare 
to the park from the city. 

Kindly advise me what to do regarding 
this Kelley letter. The above statement 
is correct, and these people should be 
handled for the outrage. 

Olsen Bros. <fc Baldwin, the booking 

outfit that sent us there, are running an 

office in Kansas City. See that performers 

coming this way are put on their guard 

against such would-be agents. 

Ring & Williams. 

Itooeka, May .°A looa. 
RhiR &, William*, fiOO Jackson street, Sioux 

City. la.: 

frontlcmen — I have your letter of the 90th Inst., 
threatening If you do not receive your salaries 
<ln<> from Olson Bros. & Baldwin and the Vino- 
wood Park Theatre Company ymi will publish the 
fact In the various theatrical publications. I have 
a letter from Mr. Baldwin Raying that he will 
be In the city In a few days, and Indicating that 
he will he willing to compromise the salaries 
of the actors who were here at the tame time 
von were. I do not know If this would he sat- 
isfactory to you or not, hut I think, as unreliable 
a party aa he seems to he, that anything you 
could get would he simply velvet. Please write 
me, Indicating whether any sort of a compromise 
would be satisfactory to you. 

I thought I showed you so clearly when you 
were here that the park company did not owe 
vou anything that you would not persist In writ- 
ing us that such was the case. If you ever pub- 
lish anything of this character In any of the 
theatrical papers, reflecting In the least degree 
on the Vlnewood Park Company. It will be the 
dearest publication yon ever inserted. I am and 
have been trying to help you, but If I receive 
another letter of the character which I am nw 
answering I shall not discommode myself further 
In vour case. Yours respectfully. 

P. O. Kelley, Secretary. 



Mr. Callahan, of the defunct team of 
Callahan and Mack, and Miss Jennie St. 
George, late of Smith and Fuller, have 
formed a combination for next season 
and are having a sketch written to be en 
titled "The Old-fashioned Neighborhood." 



Heading, Pa., June 13. 
Editor Variety i 

Sir — I wish you to correct a statement 
in last week's issue in regards to the boy 
in the Duilin and Kedcay troupe having 
his ankle broken. Such was not the case. 
In fact he wasn't disabled and only lost 
two or three shows. To-day he is as good 
as ever. The act opens at ''Wonderland," 
Revere Beach, Boston, July 2, for two 
weeks. Herbert Duffin. 



New York, June 9. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir— In your issue of this date you pub- 
lish that Kohl & Castle and Martin Beck 
are the real owners of "His Honor the 
Mayor," which is being presented at the 
New York Theatre. 

This statement is absolutely false. I 
am the sole owner of the musical play 
"His Honor the Mayor." Knowing your 
reputation for journalistic fairness, and 
feeling confident that the statement was 
printed through a misapprehension, I re- 
quest you to publish this contradiction. 

Alfred E. Aaron8. 



Syracuse, June 7. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir — I noticed in last week's issue of 
Variety it was stated that the Ellis Now- 
lan Trio canceled Hammerstein's Theatre 
without notice. In justice to ourselves 
we will state that on Tuesday, May 22, 
we asked Mr. Casey, of Morris' office, if 
he would put the date back, as Miss Now- 
lan had sprained her ankle practicing and 
we thought that we could not do justice 
to our act. Mr. Casey told us he would 
see Mr. Hammerstein that afternoon about 
it. Ellis-Nowlan Trio. 



June 11. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir— jl notice in your paper of June 9 
an artiicle referring to Lalla Selbini at 
Hammerstein's as being the wife of Willie 
Pantzer, of the "Pantzer Trio." When did 
Willie Pantzer become a member of the 
Pantzer Trio? Does the fact that tliey 
came here as the Pantzer Brothers (he and 
his brother) some years ago, saw our act 
and desiring to take advantage of our es- 
tablished reputation, returned to Europe, 
putting a negro in their act and appro- 
priated our name, prove it? We have 
been using this name for fourteen years 
in thit country, the original act consisting 
of Mr. Carl Pantzer, assisted by the Misses 
Blanche and Gertrude Pantzer. 

Mr. Pantzer was brought to this coun- 
try in 1887 by Koster & Bial, and with 
the exception of one engagement abroad 
has been playing here continuously ever 
since. 

Knowing your paper as I do, I know 
you will correct this error in your next 
issue. The Pantzer Trio. 

"The only and original." 



Ida Carle, the only woman vaudeyme 
agent around here, has serious ^mentions 
of giving up her offices in th/ St. James 
building. Miss Carle will/ book acts, 
though, as heretofore, but the young 
woman has higher aspirations. 



GOOD CIRCUS SEASON. 

The circus season is proverbially indica- 
tive of what is to follow to the theatrical 
managers the succeeding fall and winter. 
This year the tent shows have been doing 
enormous business in all parts of the coun- 
try. The returns thus far have averaged 
about thirty per cent larger than last sea- 
son, and the managerial deduction from all 
this is that the next theatrical season 
will be exceptionally good. The only one 
of the big shows that is experiencing any 
difficulty is Hagenbeck's, which is now 
owned by Havlin, Tate and Gil Robinson. 
Efforts were made thin spring to induce E. 
D. Stair to purchase an interest in the 
show, and negotiations went so far that 
Stair and his brother-in-law and general 
manager, George H. Nicolai, made a short 
tour with the organization. The head of 
the popular- price circuit finally concluded 
that circus life was a bit too strenuous 
for him — particularly when the circus syn- 
dicate is known to be camping on the 
trail of the Hagenbeck show. So much is 
this the case that the Forepaugh-Sells 
Brothers' outfit, owned by the Ringling 
Brothers and the Bailey estate, are using 
that organization for what is known in 
the tent world as a "fight show.' 



n 



RIGO STILL HAS A JOB. 

Rigo, erstwhile Prince Charmer for the 
Princess Chimay, who has been turning 
off violin solos for the delectation of Har- 
lem at Pabst's, has been engaged to re- 
move the sphere of his musical endeavors 
to the Harlem Casino, just around the 
corner. 

An offer has been made to the Hun- 
garian violinist to spend the summer at 
the Atlantic Gardens on the Bowery. 
The stipulation was made, however, that 
he should conduct the Garden's aggre- 
gation of musical girls. The table d'hote 
leader couldn't see it that way and 
grabbed off the Casino engagement, which 
is to last until next fall. After that 
Tony Pearl's restaurant is the only bid- 
der in sight. 



"OLD HEIDELBERG" ON METROPOLIS 

ROOF. 

The Hurtig & Seamon roof garden atop 
the Metropolis in the distant Bronx will 
open June 30. After much heavy thinking 
and wrinkling of the Hurtig & Seamon 
brows the name of "Old Heidelberg" has 
been decided upon as suggesting foaming 
beakers of Pilscner and at the same time 
bearing an appeal to the patronage of the 
German population above the Harlem 
River. 



VESTA VICTORIA'S NEW SONGS. 

When Vesta Victoria returns to Amer- 
ica in the fall she will have a new song 
entitled "I 'Aven't 'Ad Mc 'Oneymoon 
Yet"— a sequel to her now famous "Wait- 
ing* at the Church." 



MYERS COMING BACK. 
B. A. Myers, of Myers & Kelly, has 
left Ixmdon for a ten days tour of the 
Continent and on his return to London 
will sail for this port unheralded. 






FIGURE IT OUT. 

There are fifteen sirls in "The Social 
Whirl" at the Casino having fifteen maids* 
nnd liftem Automobiles on fifteen dollars 

per. 









8 






VARIETY 









"M iRSH" SURELY FAMOUS. 

Marshall P. Wilder walked down Broad- 
way the other day with a cane and a long 
flat box of cigars. On the outside of the 
box was emblazoned in huge gilt letters 
"Marshall Wilder Cigars." Mr. Wilder 
was conscious of the honor and exhibited 
the l.il"'l to all whom he met. The humor- 
ist, however, did not "give up," hence no 
decision has yet been rendered as to the 
quality of the Wilder weed. 



■^ 



MAY HELP SOME. 

A touring company made up of well- 
known vaudeville attractions is to be organ- 
ized to play a number of summer resorts 
during a whole week soon, the profits of the 
enterprise going into a fund for the re- 
building of the home of the Greenroom 
Hub! The company will be called "The 
Greenroom's Dress Rehearsal" and will 
open in Atlantic City. One-night stands 
will be played there, at Asbury Park and 
four other summer resorts. 



SUMMER COMPETITION. 

Logansport, Ind., June 15. 
Amnions & Dubois, of the Crystal 
Theatre Circuit, with headquarters in Lo- 
gansport, Ind., will open a new Crystal 
in Toledo, Ohio. A number of managers 
of opera houses in the Indiana towns 
where the Crystal people are located have 
come together in an agreement to give 
Ammona & Dubois a whirl for the sum- 
mer patronage by putting summer vaude- 
ville into their houses. The Crystal Cir- 
cuit book through the Henderson Agency 
in Chicago. 



RECEIVES BIG OFFER FOR BUR- 
LESQUE. 

Edgar Bixley, the comedian, who will 
present a new sketch at Proctor's Twenty- 
third Street Theatre on Monday, with an- 
other ready for production the following 
week, has received an offer for a season's 
engagement in burlesque at a salary ex- 
ceeding what he will derive from vaude- 
ville. 

Mr. Bixley has the offer under considera- 
tion. He says he prefers vaudeville, how- 
ever, if sufficient time may be secured by 
him. 



WILSON & FLYNN DIDN'T MAKE 
GOOD. 

Wilson & Flynn, the agents, made a 
partnership arrangement to furnish the 
show for the Grand Street Theatre and 
agreed to put up $200 cash toward run- 
ning expenses for this week. On Monday, 
when the $200 was to have been paid in, 
Wilson reported sick and failed to ma- 
terialize. The acts were sent down, how- 
ever, and four were cancelled after the 
first show, another after the evening per- 
formance. 

1 

ROOF HAS A TITLE. 

Tlie Metropolis Roof will have as one 
of the drawing attractions on the opening 
bill Countess Olga Rossi, who appears 
there the week commencing June 30. 

There seems to be no definite informa- 
tion as to what nation the Countess 
claims allegiance; neither d<M»s it appear 
what her "specialty" will consist of. 



The Metropolitan Opera Trio has been 
booked over tjj* Proctor circuit. 



NEW AGTS Of THE WEEK j 



\y 



Winsor McCay. 
Cartoonist. 
Twenty-third Street. 

All of the applause that Mr. McCay re- 
ceived Monday night was not due to the 
fact that his audience was familiar with 
the "Rarebit Fiend" and the others of his 
comic creations. Mr. McCay has a really 
novel and entertaining vaudeville act, 
which won instant approval in the face 
of the cartoonist's very evident nervous- 
ness. The act, during which not a word 
iB s|K>ken, is in two parts, the first in 
which white chalk against a blackboard 
is used and the second black crayon on a 
paper pad. Mr. McCay begins by rapidly 
drawing in two baby heads, boy and girl. 
Then with remarkable speed he carries the 
two rough sketches through every stage of 
life, retaining the same profiles until near 
the last, and conveying the impression of 
changing age by head dress, caps and other 
incidentals. The finale is the rapid sketch- 
ing of "Little Nemo," "Dull Care," "Hun- 
gry Henrietta" and the others of Mr. Mc- 
Cay 's "Silas" drawings. A remarkable le- 
ception was given the artist, the applause 
continuing until after the next act oc- 
cupied the stage. Rush. 




Violet Black. 

"A West Point Regulation." 

Twenty-third Street. 

Miss Black has used her present vehicle, 
"A West Point Regulation," for some 
time, but her engagement this week at 
the Twenty-third Street is her first ap- 
pearance with it in New York. The play- 
let, which is by Mary Raymond Shipman 
Andrews, is too talky and runs much to 
unconvincing farcical situations which are 
neigher new or laughable. Dick Harrison, 
a West Point cadet (Dewitt Newing), 
comes to the home of his cousin, Margery 
Harrison (Miss Black), on lovemaking 
bent in violation of the Academy's rules. 
The inopportune arrival of Lieutenant 
Masters (Thomas Wending) on the same 
mission forces the cadet to hide behind 
the piano, where he remains during a long 
comedy love passage between the lieu- 
tenant and Margery. Such is the light 
and flimsy basis of a twenty-minute 
sketch. Most of the humor grows out of 
an occasional sneeze from behind the 
piano and the efforts of Margery to pre- 
vent the lieutenant from investigating. 
Miss Black does not make her character 
the sweet coy young thing the text seems 
to have in mind and the cadet plays in an 
uncalled for burlesque vein. 



.V 



I 



Lee Tung Foo. 
Baritone. 

Hammerstein's Roof Garden. 

Something of an oddity, Lee Tung Foo, 
an Americanized Chinaman, came here on 
Monday after playing in the West. Ap- 
pearing in his native garb, Mr. Foo pre- 
sented a picturesque appearance, but 
through having the opening position on 
the bill very few who attended the Roof 
had an opportunity of seeing him. It 
was the worst possible position for a 
singer amid surroundings always difficult 
to overcome with vocal selections. The 
Chinaman has a good baritone voice, but 
misplaces it in attempting to sing bass 



songs. His first number, "Asleep in the 
Deep," suffered for this reason. A Chinese 
ditty was given; also a drinking song sung 
in German. "Molly O" in English ren- 
dered at the close pleased the audience, 
who considered it a novelty to hear a 
Chinaman sing in three languages. When 
Mr. Foo concludes to select popular mel- 
odies, confining himself to enclosed the- 
atres, he will be a talked-about attraction. 

tiime. 




Mr. and Mrs. Browning. 
"Going Into Vaudeville." 
Pastor's. 

A rather tiresome burlesque sketch 
given in one with a s|>ecial drop repre- 
senting a stage door. Mr. Browning plays 
a "sissy" character in search of a theatri- 
cal engagement. Mrs. Browning is the 
actress whom he hopes to interest in his 
ambition. The whole sketch is keyed in 
a noisy vein of comedy and depends upon 
Mr. Browning's odd makeup and his freak 
vocal and facial mannerisms. His efforts 
in these directions dragged the reluctant 
laughs out of the Tuesday afternoon's au- 
dience. Mrs. Browning did very little. 
There is possible place for the sketch, but 
it will have to be brightened up consider- 
able and shortened. Rush. 



Dan Barrett and Company. / 
Comedy Sketch. } / 

Pastor's. 1/ 

The accent is strong on the comedy. Mr. 
Barrett has long been identified with Irish 
dialect roles and in his present sketch 
holds to that characterization. As a com- 
edian he is not without humor, but in 
his present offering he is hopelessly handi- 
capped by a poor vehicle. The sketch 
structure is at no time visible to the 
naked eye, has no story to tell and fills 
out the required time only by the dragged- 
in specialties of the principal. A long 
dialogue between Mr. Barrett and his wife 
over, "the widow's" late husband gave op 
portunity for the best comedy for Pastor 
appreciation in the sketch and yielded a 
good percentage of laughs. A stump 
speech delivered from the top of a table 
had no place in the act and there was 
little excuse for the fight with a police- 
man which was introduced to catch the 
gallery through its roughness. Rush. 



OUT OP TOWN 



\i 



Le Brim Opera Trio. 
Grand Opera Selections. 
Olympic, Chicago. 

Tne trio consists of Antoinette Le Brun, 
Fritz N. Huttman and James F. Stevens, 
recently with grand opera. The soprano 
lias a voice of wide range and much sweet- 
ness. The tenor uses his clear vocal notes 
to advantage in the prison scene from "II 
Trovatore," opening the act. The closing 
scene shows a garden, and gives the bari- 
tone an opportunity to use his splendid 
voice. 'I he selections from the opera arc 
effectively rendered and brought forth 
considerable applause. Settings and cos- 
tumes are elaborate. Frank Wirslcrfj. 

Inman's Concert Hall at Coney Island 
is having its vaudeville acts booked by 
Al Mayer. 



LONDON'S BREVITIES. 

June 6. 

England is to-day the greatest theatre- 
going nation in the world. Even now, 
when everyone is complaining of the scar- 
city of money, there are new halls being 
built all over the country, and what 
strikes an American when he arrives here 
is the way people who are going to the 
cheaper parts of the houses line up at 
the theatres. They get in line about 
five o'clock, rain or shine. Some bring 
camp stools. Think of waiting three 
hours before the performance begins! No 
American would have the patience. Now- 
adays you can fancy yourself on Broad- 
way. Such familiar faces as Frank 
Daniels, Lew Fields, Barney Myers, Daniel 
Frohman and many others are in evi- 
dence. 

Hamilton Hill has contracts for the 
Keith circuit— he opens October 1 in New 
York. Keith will open an oflice hero. 

There will be an invasion of English 
artists this year every one has the fever 
to go to America; but if the American 
audiences are as hard to please as M. A. 
Shea, whose is here looking for talent, I 
am afraid there will not be many suc- 
cesses. 

Roberts, Hayes and Roberts arrived here 
last week and opened Monday at the Em- 
pire, Bradford. Johnnie Ford opened Mon- 
day at the Tivoli. Mame Gehrue is an- 
other newscomer and opened at the Ox- 
ford. 

Gus Elen, the coster comedian, won his 
case against Collins's Music Hall and re^- 
ceived $175 damages for not having his 
name displayed enough on the bill. Belle 
Belmont, a new turn from over the pond, 
opens at the Royal, Holborn, July 16. 
Stine and Evans sail to-day, Wednesday. 
Ferguson and Mack have contracts run- 
ning into 1909. Wilson Hallett, the Eng- 
lish child mimic, sails for America No- 
vember 6. William Hargrave, the Eng- 
lish song writer, will be in New York 
in about four weeks time. Mile. Nadje 
sails August 24 on the Baltic. 

Vesta Victoria opened at the Tivoli 
Monday night. Peggie Pride has recovered 
from a serious illness. Maud Courtney, 
the American girl in song and story, is at 
the Empire, Liverpool, this week. Hayes 
and Suits, two Americans, have been a 
success on a Stoll tour. 

Some one reported that Harry Gillett 
was dead. I saw a wire from him Sun- 
day that he has never been in better 
health. Star and Leslie have a very 
unique card out telling you how to beat 
the horses. Star is an old Cincinnati boy, 
as is Jimmy Atchew, the club juggler. The 
Theatrical and Sports Review, the new 
paper, has caught on over here. 

The London County Council is pre- 
paring to serve a notice on the owners 
of the Canterbury requiring such drastic 
alterations as to amount to a practical 
reconstruction of the building. The work 
is to be begun in three months and com- 
pleted in six. The subject is being much 
discussed in music hall circles in a spirit 
of sympathy with George Adney Payne. 
In the Canterbury and Paragon $60,000 
have already been spent to satisfy the re- 
quirements of the Council. 

Burt Earle, American banjoist, who en- 
joyed a run of six consecutive months at 
the Empire, Leicester square, closed at 
that house Saturday night. He has in 
preparation a musical monologue and will 
be seen at the Palace shortly. Rally. 



VARIETY 



Shows of the Week 






By Rush 



PASTOR'S. 

Al H. Weston and company in the sec- 
ond week with "The New Reporter" is 
the headliner. The amusing little bur- 
lesque pleased the Pastor audience im- 
mensely. The comedy runs a good deal 
to money changing, but the familiar tricks 
are worked with a speed that keeps the 
act running to the final number. The 
last song might be enlivened by a bit 

more of a dance. 

Mr. and Mrs. Browning and Dan Barrett 
and company, who have been in vaude- 
ville these many years, both appeared in 
new sketches and are under New Acts. 

Among the early numbers Elwood and 
Maggie Benton failed to arouse any great 
degree of enthusiasm. The man of the 
pair has a good strong voice, which might 
In- made the basis for a better offering. 
The present sketch 'being a mere collec- 
tion of selected talk, and not very wel! 
selected at that, will not land them in 
a better position. 

Harry Holman has hit upon about the 
right grade of comedy talk for Pastor's. 
His parodies were liked and the suit of 
flaming red that goes with the blackface, 
makeup struck the house as being funny. 

O'Rourke and Gillian showed some good 
dancing on the part of the woman of the 
combination. The man's voice is one of 
fair quality, but a bit weak. Both dressed 
in good taste, but the woman's first gown 
might be brightened up. 

Little. Grace Childers pieces out a weak 
acrobatic dancing and contortion specialty 
with a trick dog. She keeps up a good 
average of speed in her work, and in this 
way gets away with fifteen minutes or so 
of time fairly well. A new trick or two 
properly placed would not be amiss. 

Murray, Clayton and Drew (two women 
and a man) show many of the features of 
Fred Ray's Roman travesty. They use 
"The Lady of Lyons" for the burlesque. 
Most of the business is exceedingly rough 
burlesque, but some of the lines are 
funny, and Harry Murray has a ridiculous 
facial makeup that won him a laugh im- 
mediately. Verona D. Clayton and Lil- 
lian Drew both have fair voices and their 
duet was well liked. Mr. Murray didn't 
sing. 

George W. Cunningham and Geneva 
Smith have burdened a knockabout sketch 
with a lot of useless talk. Cunningham 
in so far as he confines himself to acro- 
batics and dancing is excellent, but the 
comedy talk of the pair isn't funny. 

Arlington and Delmore's best feature is 
the tramp character of the man. He has 
some clever dance steps and business with 
a cigar. Both have voices suitable for 
their purpose. 

The Yalto duo in a novelty dancing 
act do not put as much whirlwind action 
into their work as do most following that 
line. The woman particularly displayed 
a lack of energy. 

The Buch Brothers in a comedy acro- 
batic act with a tremplin have a novel 
setting. It is a back drop showing a 
steamship deck with the bounding net 
disguised as a bulwark. Both men dress 
as sailors. Somersaults and double for- 
wards in the net made it attractive. 

The Gartelle Brothers with comedy 
roller skating complete the bill. 



HENDERSON'S. 

The show is being run oir more and 
more smoothly every week at the Coney 
Island music hall. 

McCrea and Poole, sharpshooters, hold 

over for the second week. McCrea's rou- 
tine work gets away from the familiar 
at nearly all points and the "human tar- 
get" feature is something of. a startler. 
The absence of all talk helps the act for 
Coney Island purposes, but McCrea would 
do well to unbend to acknowledge his 
applause more gracefully. 

Bissett and Scott are a pair of well 
set up youngsters who do fast and skill- 
ful dancing in clogs. The smaller of the 
pair was particularly clever in a num- 
ber of whirlwind steps, and the unison 
dancing of the team was above the aver- 
age. They worked at high speed and 
got away in time. 

Lasky and Rolfe's Fourteen Black Hus- 
sars topped the bill. They are seen here 
to good advantage, the extreme volume of 
their brasses being made less oppressive 
than in a quiet house by the surrounding 
noise. They retain their rough-house fin- 
ish with the bass drums, a feature which 
the seashore audience accepted as good 
comedy. 

The Four Sawadas, Japanese equilib- 
rists, were billed but did not appear, their 
place being taken by Annie Chandler, 
whose imitations were well liked, although 
her voice did not reach the distant parts 
of the hall. 

Went worth and Vesta clowned it in 
quite the accepted English way and put 
over some fair laughing feats with the 
aid of a trick pup. The falls were well 
enough done, but the pair have not yet 
learned that mere walking around the 
stage does not constitute genuine comedy. 
There was not much of this sort of thing, 
but the little there was might be elimi- 
nated with profit. 

The Musical Heuhn, working in Ger- 
man character makeup, was not heavy 
enough in the music department to win 
any great degree of popularity. His bells 
do not yield any great amount of noise, 
but there was ample compensation in their 
sweetness of tone. 

Johnnie Carroll, better known as 
"Brooklyn Johnnie," was on the "home 
diamond" and scored through being a lo- 
cal favorite. Of the two sister teams who 
appeared, Bortina and Brock way and Ren- 
nier ami Gaudier, the latter had rather 
the l>est of the competition in the matter 
of dressing. Both acts were a bit better 
than fair, Bertina and Brock way depend- 
ing upon the acrobatic and contortion 
dancing of the heavier girl, and Rennier 
atld Gaudier making their appeal through 
neatness of appearance and straight soft 
shoe dancing. Their songs were fairly 
good. 

Bristol's ponies make up a decidedly at- 
tractive animal act. The half dozen ani- 
mals are trained to a number of n«>vel 
and clever tricks, particularly the small- 
est pony, which does most of the comedy 
part of the act. A trained donkey helped 
out in the comedy department. 

Among the others were the Grand 
Opera Trio, Yorke Comedy Four, better 
vocally than with their comedy; the 
Great Frederick in a slack wire special 
tv and Alexis and Schall. 



TWENTY-THIRD STREET. 

Two acts new to the town and the pres- 
ence of Harry Pilcer as leader of Max 
Witt's "Six Sophomores and a Freshman'' 
give special interest to the bill at the 

Twenty-third street house. "Silas" 
(Win McCay), the cartoonist, and Violet 
Black in "A West Point Regulation" are 
under New Acts. 

Eddie Hume's successor in the role of 
the Freshman helps the act immensely. 
Young Pilcer was formerly the office boy 
with Hope Booth's "The Little Blonde 
Lady." He is decidedly clever. With a 
singing voice far from musical, Pilcer 
talks his lines somewhat after the man- 
ner of George M. Cohan, whom he has 
apparently taken as his model in stage 
deportment. He does an excellent dance 
and makes his "kidding" of the girls fair- 
ly entertaining. It is hard to understand 
why Che opportunity of making a change 
of costume given by Pilcer's dance is not 
taken advantage of. It would brighten 
up the general effect of the act materi- 
ally. The text seems to have been edited 
somewhat, much of the superfluous dia- 
logue that formerly hampered the piece 
having been eliminated. 

W. C. Fields, the eccentric juggler for- 
merly with "The Ham Tree," is very well 
liked here. Fields has worked out a 
series of novel and ingenious tricks and 
performs with dash and certainty. He 
works entirely in pantomime and displays 
a curious and altogether delightful twist 
of dumb comedy. Monday night the act 
went through without a single slip and 
the juggler was given several recalls. 

Dan Sherman and Mal>el I)e Forest aid 
still doing their shipwreck sketch to the 
accompaniment of hearty laughter from 
the upper house. Not a little of Sher- 
man's comedy, rough as it undoubtedly is, 
gets to the orchestra and boxes, and his 
makeup starts the act off with a scream. 

Campbell and Johnson, comedy cyclists, 
have some really good comedy mixed up 
with bicycle riding and acrobatics. The 
white face man does some of his falls 
well, lie got a gasp of surprise from 
the stunt of doing a twitting forward 
across the orchestra pit into the lefthand 
aisle. They have a good entrance and 
fill their allotted time with fairly speedy 
action. 

The Boldens, billed as "king pins of col- 
ored entertainers." hardly made good to 
that degree, but the acrobatic dancing of 
the man carried the act well enough for 
an opening number. 

They were followed bv the Karaeyi in 
;i musical act. the feature whereof waa 
the "Mvroplionc." a complicated mechani- 
cal arrangement which made music re- 
sembling that of an organ. Thev close 
with the bells, playing with rather mass- 
ive effect. 

Lillian Shaw retains the same repertoire 
of songs and parodies, closing with the 
Katie Barry imitation, which, by the 
way. appears to be getting a good deal of 
attention these days. This number in- 
volves a lot of extern, talk with occupants 
of the lw>xes, which amuses. 



Another recruit to vaudeville from "The 
Karl and the Girl" is Templer S<ixe. Air. 
Saxe will shortly give a "try out" in a 
Keith house as a vocalist. 



KEITH'S. 

Williaid Siinms, late of "The Rollicking 
Girl," assisted by Kdith Conrad, was ac- 
corded the headline position. The sketch 

is essentially the same as that in which 
Mr. Simms was seen several years ago 
and pleased. 

Mr. and Mrs. Perkins Fisher handle 
"The Half Way House," a rural sketch by 
Ezra Kendall, very capably. The act is 
light in dramatic interest, without suffi- 
cient plot structure to give it the dignity 
of classification as a playlet, but develops 
enough of neat and delicate comedy of the 
Kendall sort to make it decidedly enter- 
taining. It has an excellent finish with 
pretty light effects and a bit of sentiment. 

The comedian in tramp makeup is the 
strength of the eccentric comedy team of 
Swan and Bambard. Some of his bur- 
lesque posings and melodramatic stunts 
are exceedingly funny, while the acro- 
batics of the other comedian are first rate. 

McNamee, clay modeller, saves an act in 
which the technical work is somewhat 
below par by working in an occasional 
laugh. Several of his figures were poorly 
done, but the final one, a small bas-relief 
of Venus de Milo, was exceedingly good. 

Al Carle ton had 'em going at his en- 
trance and his first song went with a 
whoop. But when he shifted to his talk 
the laughs were further apart. Carleton 
gets his humor out of his extreme lean- 
ness, which is accentuated by the tight 
black cutaway coat and narrow trousers 
worn. 

The World's Comedy Four have the al- 
most universal fault of Iwdly put together 
comedy. Their singing was good in its 
harmony and the clowning is mercifully 
confined to one of the quartette. 

The Four Lukeus are in their usual po- 
sition at the close of the show. Theirs 
is too good an act to be injured by care- 
less dressing. Their costumes show hard 
wear and are faded from many cleanings. 
'Hie sensational features of the casting are 
still being done with no falling off in 
smoothness or speed. 

Leonard Kane is an excellent wooden 
shoe (lancer, but should realise that a 
straight dancing act with no relief ex- 
cept t he change of costume in these days 
of novelty will never win him better posi- 
tion. Kane dresses his specialty with in- 
genuity, appearing entirely in white 
against a dead black drop. He has gone 
as far as he well can in this particular 
and should secure some other novelties to 
bolster his turn up. 

I'ci rero'i Human Orchestra is so named 
for no apparent reason except that the 
feature of the act is a dog. This animal 
has been trained to several really remark- 
able tricks. The best of these is the play- 
ing of the national air on a set of bells, 
the trainer being off the stage. The trick 
is so well done that it creates a suspicion 
that some mechanical means is employed, 
but the closest scrutiny fails to expose 
it. 

Among the others were Laurie Ordway, 
English character comedienne; Phil Rado 
and Jessie Bert man in a comedy sketch; 
the Zanoras. comedy cyclists; Tom Moore 
and Grace Cameron. 

Machnow, the Russian giant, arrived 
yesterday. 






I 






10 



VARIETY 












;,;. 



Dn»t,d to th* inUrssis of Songs mnd Stngors. V-J V>* 1^1 I ^ wLj0 K M^ l\ VW W\ ^L-F 



Drifted to th* interests of Songs mnd Stngers. 

A4dr*M all communication* t« 

(HAS. K. UAHHIR, 81 W. tilt It., N. T 

(litycr Coh«B, Mgr.) 



Vol. 2. 



New York, June 16, 1006. 



No. 6. 



1 



Victor's Band of sixty 
men, especially en- 1 
gaged for Dreamland ! 
Park, Coney Island, 
has created a positive 
sensation in the man- 
ner in which tbey ren- 
der "Mother, Pin a 
Rose on Me," and it 
was a wonderful 
thing last Sunday 
when this band start- 
ed to play this num- 
ber to hear thirty 
thousand voices a 1 1 
over Dreamland Park 
Join in the chorus of 
"Mother, Mother, 
Mother, Pin a Rose on 
Me," as if they had 
It rehearsed for a 
long time, and they 
bad to respond to re- 
peated encores. There 
Is no doubt but what 
Victor's Band is de- 
serving of the enor- 
mous success It Is 
meeting with at this 
popular resort. 

Miss Susie Fisher, now 
playing the Keith and 
Proctor circuits, 
writes from Boston 
that her success with 
her singing of "Some- 
where," "Just One 
Word of Consolation" 



has been phenomenal 
and she will continue 
to use these songs, ss 
they are the best bal- 
lads she has had In 
years, ami. as good 
songs an- hard to get, 
they are worth keep- 
ing In her repertoire. 
The press notices 
from Portland, Me., 
speak in glowlug 
terms of Miss Kisher'it 
rendition of both 
songa. 

Miss Vallie Kgar, a 
clever soubrctte. Is 
singing "The Tale of 
a Stroll," "Sister" 
and "Dreaming, Love, 
of You." with great 
success. 

Miss Agnes Bayliss, who 
not alone sings the 
best operatic selec- 
tions, is also sing- 
ing "Somewhere," 
"Dreaming, Love, of 
You," and "Just One 
Word of Consolation." 
As Miss Bayliss is 
booked through New 
Kngland for the sum- 
mer, her voice will be 
heard to great advan- 
tage in that section of 
the country. 



Mt. Vesuvius (Electric Park, Newark, 
N. J.).— Charles A. Dunlap, the park man- 
ager, and inventor of theatrical effects, has 
opened his new open-air spectacle, "Mt. 
Vesuvius," at the above-named park. The 
scene is geographically accurate, and the 
depiction of the volcanic eruption is most 
realistic and thrilling. On the side of the 
mountain are several villages; near its 
base is the Bay of Naples. At the open- 
ing the scene is one of calm and beauty. 
Boats are sailing on the bay and trains 
are carrying their loads of tourists to see 
the wonderful mountain. Night ap- 
proaches and lights appear in the houses 
on the mountainside. Darkness comes, 
and with it is heard the dreaded rumbling. 
The thin vapor that has been coming from 
the crater grows in volume, dense clouds 
of smoke follow, then detonations, and 
then a crash. The terror of an eruption 
is fully expressed. Fire, smoke, steam 
and lava commingle. The fiery stream 
flows down the mountainside, wiping out 
the villages. It is the most sensational 
and awe-inspiring spectacle ever given in 
this city and is the talk of the town. That 
it is a success at this early stage is evi- 
dent by the increasing crowds daily at this 
resort. Mr. Dunlap has been working on 
this scenic masterpiece for quite some time 
and deserves credit for his undertaking. 
The amount expended on the spectacle 
will reach close on to $25,000. 

Joe O'Bryan. 



W. S. Schultz, secretary of the com- 
pany building Luna Park, Hartford, Conn., 
announces that it will be opened to the 
• public June 23. A trolley track will 
be extended to the grounds, making it 
more easily accessible. 



New White City, Savin Rock, New 
Haven, Conn., has Kneeling's diving horses 
as feature this week. Concerts are given 
afternoon and evening and attendance is 
reported as very large. 



Chestnut Hill Park at Philadelphia has 
been renamed "White City." 



The new park between Baltimore and 
Annapolis will open .Inly 4. 



STEEPLECHASE PARK, 
ISLAND. 



CONEY 



NowIh'iv in Gbnev Island is then bet 
ter illustrated the present day "square 
deal" policy of up to-date park managers 
than at (Jeorge C. Tillyou's Steeplechase. 
In the old attitude of the warm weather 
amusement purveyor the keynote was 
purpose of getting everything possible 
from the patrons with as little return as 
invisible. Intelligent business men and 
business methods have changed all this un- 
til every effort is being made to give a 
substantial return. 

The "combination ticket" is the feature 
that gives the Tillyou resort its indiviual- 
'ity. This card, which costs a quarter of 
a dollar entitles the holder to admission 
to twenty-five attractions, comprising 
most all of the entertainments. 

But the point is that just as good treat- 
ment is given to the holders of these 
cheap tickets as to those who pay the 
extra fee for the outside attractions, and 
every effort seems to be made to keep the 
smaller entertainments up to the mark. 

A new feature of the combination show 
this year is "Dida," an illusion described 
as the creation of a woman out of noth- 
ing, which has been seen in vaudeville. 
The trick is rather transparent to the 
initiated, but is worked with smoothness 
and speed enough to mystify. 

Steeplechase Park is rather more at- 
tractive by daylight than after dark. No 
sparing of money is noticeable in the gen- 
eral "dressing" of the place, except that 
the electric display is meagre in com- 
parison with the illumination of the other 
parks on the Island. One of the prettiest 
spots to be found at the beach is the 
rose garden surrounding the bandstand, 
where a score of varieties of the rose are 
blooming. The band itself, made up of 
thirty pieces and led by Cnmpione, is ex- 
cellent for open-air purposes, while a 
somewhat smaller hand plays dance 
music in the ballroom. 

Following the newly awakened craze 
for roller skating the gallery surrounding 
the swimming pool, said to be the sec- 
ond largest in the United States, has 
been utilized. The rink is open in the 
centre square, occupied on the lower floor 
by the tank. The square track around 
the building is perhaps thirty-five feet 
wide and the water keeps the air cool. 
One thing with which the park people 
could dispense with profit is the set of 
heavy chimes. They are played only at 
very wide intervals, but at these times 
inflict a real inconvenience upon the park 
patrons by drowning out all other sounds, 
even private conversation. 

There seems to be a homelike atmos- 
phere about Steeplechase which is absent 
from both of the other two parks. Tn 
Dreamland the whole ground plan is ex- 
posed at first glance. This holds true to 
a lesser degree at Luna Park as well. 
But there are a dozen odd walks and pas- 
sages to attract in the Tillyou institu- 
tion, and every turn brings a new part of 
the place into view. 

Rush. 



Steeplechase Park, Bridgeport, Conn., 
is now opened. In addition to the nu- 
merous attractions Geo. C. Tilyou, the 
owner, is giving free vaudeville weekly. 



DREAMLAND, CONEY ISLAND. 

The idea ut Dreamland this season 
m'ciiis to be that money spent inside the 
turnstiles is much better invested for 
I lie final profit of the resort than any 
outlay for street advertising. At any 
rate it is evident that an effort is being 
made to attract patronage through free 
attractions. 

For the lirut time a free vaudeville en- 
tertainment is being offered. The palm 
garden back of the tower has been raised 
to the level of the board walk and fitted 
with chairs and tables. The stage, a 
rather small one, faces away from the 
ocean. The bill for the current week 
is William G. Carle's "Nine Clarindas," a 
colored operatic troupe; the three Mad- 
caps, acrobatic dancers; Davey and Phil- 
ips, singers and dancers; the Chameroys, 
pantomime, and the Messenger Boy Trio. 
Thomas Glenroy, last season with T. W. 
Dinkins' "Baltimore Beauties," is stage 
manager . for the summer theatre, and 
Joseph Mu Her, Jr., attends to the music. 

Victor's band, an organization of 25 
pieecs, which played va,udeville dates last 
season, began the engagement Saturday of 
iast week. 

Among the new features of the park 
this year is Roltaire's "Pharoah's Daugh- 
ter," a pantomimic play with a sort of 
Greek chorus built around the Biblical 
tale of the finding of Moses. The story 
is given delicate and almost poetic treat- 
ment, the effect of dignity being largely 
increased by the man, who delivers a run- 
ning recitation in a beautiful, melodious 
voice. Two women are used, and splendid 
light effects make the attraction well 
worth while. 

"Creation" in its old position has sud- 
denly become the banner attraction of the 
park. The business is reported to have 
more than doubled last year's so far. 
Some changes have been made in the 
spectacle and a number of new mechani- 
cal eeffcts added. A companion spectacle 
called "The End of the World" has been 
opened on the west side of the square. 
This begins where "Creation" ends and 
tells the rest of the story. Over a hun- 
dred people are used in the two audi- 
toriums, which are connected by under- 
ground* passages lined with descriptive 
pictures. 

The space occupied last year by "The 
Bumps" is now given over to a motion 
picture show called "Le Voyage en l'Air," 
showing several reels taken in a balloon 
flight over New York. 

The other attractions remain about as 
they were last year, with Bostock's Ani- 
mal show in the main position at the 
upper end. One of the most clever ad- 
vertising devices conceived for show pur- 
poses in its cheapness and simplicity is 
the "statue" figure in bronze outside the 
Bostock building. The man made up to 
represent an old Roman warrior is past 
middle age, and truly looks the part. 
Slightly swaying from side to side, main- 
taining a pose for a moment only, he 
has become an attraction, stopping the 
crowds who pause to figure out the prob- 
lem presented. The new "Snn Francisco 
Disaster" on the former "Fire and 
Flames" site opens to-day. Judging 
from Sunday's attendance Dreamland is 
doing better than holding its place in the 
popular regard. Ruah. 



Cobb's Corner 



JUNK 16, 1006. 



No. 16. A WMkly Word With WILL til* Wordwritfht. 



Call and see me about that SKETCH, 
that ACT, that SONG, that PARODY. 

'Twon't cost you anything to talk it 
over. 

If your "turn" needs a half-sole and 
heel, or a patch, bring it to 

WILL, D. COBB 

WORDWRIOHT 
Theatrical Exchange Bldf., 
143 1 BROADWAY, 
HEW YORK CITY 



There was a rumor during the week to 
the effect that Frederick Ingersoll would 
withdraw from Luna Park at Pittsburg 
through disposing of the stock he now 
holds in the enterprise. At the New York 
ollice of the Ingersoll & Hopkins Co. the 
report was denied, although it was stated 
at the same time that Mr. Ingersoll would 
prefer to leave the management of all 
parks entirely alone after construction. 
Mis associates in all the ventures have in- 
sisted that he continue the active manage- 
ment, which Mr. Ingersoll considers a 
burden. His province lies in construction, 
not management. When an attempt was 
recently made by him to leave Luna Park 
in Cleveland, the outcry was so loud 
against him doing so that he reluctantly 
remained. 



The Navessars, the newly organized 
Ladies' Military Brass Band, being com- 
posed of the various musical acts under 
ihe direction of Dial & Armstrong, opens 
its season at Luna Park, Washington, on 
• lune 18. The band has been engaged for 
ten weeks over the Ingersoll circuit of 
parks. After that time has been played 
t he managers will replace the Vassar Girls, 
Navajo Girls and Four Seasons in vaude- 
ville, filling their ranks with other young 
women musicians. The female comple- 
ment of the band is fifty, said to be the 
largest band of its kind in existence. 



The Ingersoll folk are very much in fear 
that difficulty will be had in holding the 
girls engaged for the spectacle to be given 
at their "Mexidrome" in the City of Mex- 
ico. The "greasers" are quite fond of 
American young women and offer many 
inducements for the girls to desert. One 
precaution the park people intend tak- 
ing is to board the chorus inside the en- 
closure under guards or chaperones, pro- 
viding a fine for anyone not in her room 
by eleven o'clock at night. With thi* 
and other safety measures, though, they 
do not feel assured of holding the ranks 
intact. 



The time that may be offered by the 
Ingersoll circuit of parks next season is 
estimated at from eighteen to twenty 
weeks. Foreign acts will be imported for 
i heir sole use, the field for open-air or 
"circus acts" having become so enlarged 
that the native commodity does not sup- 
ply the demand. 



VARIETY 



11 



Songs That Win on Their Merits 



43 
o 
u 

U 

43 



a 
I* 



Professional 

Department 



HARRY JONES 
THOS. KELLY 
JOE McNATTI 



o 

o 

s 

M. 

B 

H 

ff 

o 






3 

a 
g 



Murphy and Ulbsou's minstrels continue to draw 

here. THE SAVOY THEATRE will put in two 

weeks of vaudeville commencing July 2 under the 
iii:iii:iK*'iin-iit of Ben Harris. 8. WACHTER. 



FRANCIS, DAY ft HUNTER 

15 WEST 30th STREET, NEW YORK 



CORRESPONDENCE 

STRAIGHT TALK FROM JOHN ROBINSON'S 
TEN BIO SHOWB. 

It Is strange that the dramutic papers and show 
folk act frequently get dates mixed regarding age 
and ownership and manngeincnt of the John Robin- 
son Circus. Recently an Item went the rounds 
giving a man named Rogers as once a partner In 
the enterprise, also that the present owner. Gover- 
nor John P. Robinson, was seventy years of age, 
and his son, the present manager, John O. Robin- 
son, forty years old. Further, that the show start- 
ed in 1H46. No man named Rogers was ever part- 
ner In the Robinson Circus. The writer evidently 
was thinking of Charles Rogers, of the old-time 
Spaulding & Rogers Circus. There have only been 
two real partners in this business. The tlrst was 
G. N. Eldred and the other was the well-known 
Mr. Lake. Governor Robinson's present age is 
sixty-three. His son is thirty-four. Uncle John 
Robinson, who founded the show in 1821 (this 
being Its eighty-fifth year), retired from the active 
management in 1858, when the Governor took 
charge. Uncle John died in 1888. The Governor 
Is the dean of the circus world. While there are 
perhaps older showmen in point of age, he is by 
odds the oldest in point of active service. Even 
i<> day he is on the lot looking after the Interest 
of the big enterprise. He became absolute pro- 
prietor In 1871. He was born in the business and 
at one time was one of the premier riders of the 
business. His son, John G. Robinson, is the young- 
est circus manager In the world and took the sad- 
dle ms manager in 1896. John Robinson's Circus is 
the daddy of them all. It was an old show when 
many of the present day organizations were not 
thought of and when the oldest of them was in 
swaddling clothes, litis year's business is phe- 
nomenal and the weather great. To date we have 
only had three days of rain. Last season we were 
out until December 8 and the chances are we will 
go until Christmas this year. 

DOC WADDELL. 



ALBANY, N. Y. 

PROCTOR'S (Howard Graham, res. mgr.). — 
Week 11: Bert White and Plorllla Kan ford in a 
musical playlet were entertaining; Irene Lee and 
her candy kids were good; Nellie Beaumont and 
company In "My Busy Day" were excellent; Bloek- 
som and Burns, same act; Louis A. Simon, Grace 
Gardner and company in "The New Coachman" are 
elever, provoking much laughter; Hoey and Leo. 
Hebrew comedians, were fair; The Globe of Death 

was good. ELECTRIC PARK.— Cold weather 

held attedance down. Week 11: Gus Edwards' 
Postal Telegraph boys and girls, good; Maxwell 
and Dudley, fair; Seebnck exhibited some clever 
bag punching; Rio Brothers, acrobats, good; 
1)anclng Mitchells worked hard and pleased. 

MARTEL. 



ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 

YOUNG'S PIER (Henry Myers, mgr.).— Week 
ll: Rose DeHoven and her Septet for a second 
week sored the hit of the bill. Brlndamore plays 
n return engagement; Mr. and Mrs. Jlmmle Barry 
nre held over and show a new act here; The 
Sharplles, musical duo. fair; Elinor Henry, sing- 
ing, good; O. T. Flske and Mellle McDonougli, 
fair; I^es Durand Duo. operatic songs, good; 

Klnetograph. STEEPLECHASE PIER (Giles 

Clement, mgr.). — Week 11: Irene LaTour and her 
dog, good; Bates Musical Trio, good; Mlllershlp 
Sisters, good; Hathaway Indian Tableaux, good; 
Shllds and Gall, rings, good; Golden and Hughes, 
blackface, fair; Ed Mora. Illustrated sings, good. 

— GOUVBRNATOR'S (Sid Fern, mgr.).— Week 
11: The Vanos, handcuff artists, good; Mario and 
Aldo. gymnasts, good; Rice Family, musical, fair; 
Monte Mlro Troupe, good; The Everetts, sketch, 
fair; Mrs. C. Leslie Evans and company, sketch, 
good; Alvln Brothers, gymnasts, good; The Bart- 
••lms, acrobats, good; Four Shannons, singers *nd 
• lancers, good: Gardner ond Golden, sketch, good; 
Itlake and Voss, Hebrew Impersonators, fair; 
Three Jaoksons. physical culture, fair; Ben Frank 
llu and Toodles, hit; Mlrto and Dial, burl»sqne. 
good; Kaufmann Sisters, singers and dancers, 
good. - -STEEL PIER (J. Botbwell, mgr.).— 



BUFFALO, N. Y. 

SHEA'S (M. Shea, mgr.).— I^ist week's bill 
drew excellent bouses. Fludlay and Burke, ex- 
cellent; Ward and Curran, very good, big hit; 
Jack Wilson Trio, fairly good; Charlotte Ravens- 
croft, good voice, fairly good violinist; Claude 
Gillingwater and company in "A Strenuous Pro 
posal," sketch too poor to give artists a chance 
to show their ability; Ben Welch scored a bit 
with his old monologue; Eight Allisons, excellent. 
Bill for week of 18 Includes Edwin Stevens and 
company, Sabel Johnson, Bedlnl and Arthur, Julie 
King and company, Palfrey and Barton, Irving 

Jones. Coin's Dogs and the Klnetograph. 

LAFAYETTE (Chas. M. Bagg, mgr.).— The sec- 
ond week of the stock company drew fairly well. 
Both burlesques were very poor. The olio: Wil- 
son and Proctor, fair; Williams and Aleene, 
good; the Brothers Riva, excellent. Better bur- 
lesques will have to be offered the public or the 
closing day of the stock company is in sight. 
Week of 18: The stock company and Gus Camp- 
bell, Mr. and Mrs. Larry Shaw and J. C. Hart 

and company. LINN'S MUSEUM (Dr. Hugh J. 

Linn, mgr.). — The Beauty Show drew crowds 
week of 11. Bill for week of 18: The Seymours, 
Kae Vaughn, Geo. W. Leslie, Jos. T. Kelly, M. 

Hamlin and moving pictures. ATHLETIC 

PARK (R. H. MacBroom, gen. mgr.).— The cold 
weather decreased the attendance considerable 
week of 11. Bill for week of 18: The St. Bel- 
mos, Adele Purvis Onrl, Four American Trumpet- 
ers, Eckel and Warner and Harry Tsqda. 

NOTES.— Charles M. Jacobs has signed with Gor- 
ton's Minstrels to play principal end and do his 
specialty. T. J. Farron, Jr., and Charles Murray 
are building a baseball gallery at Athletic Park. 
Margie Edwards leaves the Lafayette Stock Com- 
pany to-night. Phillips and Traynor, stars of 
"The Trip lo Egypt," have returned to town for 
the summer. CHIME. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 

MAJESTIC (C. E. Draper, mgr. for Kohl & 
Castle). — Headline honors are awarded Emma 
Cams, whose name appears at the top of an ex- 
ceptionally attractive list of entertaining acts. 
Eva Mudge made her first appearance here in two 
years and offers a protean singing sketch in which 
she makes seven rapid changes of costume. The 
success she achieved was instantaneous and on 
Monday afternoon relieved herself from several 
additional encores by a neat little speech. Miss 
Carus' songs are well chosen and received much 
applause. "The Inspector from Kansas," pre- 
sented by Olive May and John Albaugh, Jr., Is 
well acted and pleased the audience Immensely. 
Howard Brothers give a mystifying exhibition of 
mental telegraphy. The act is similar to the 
Fays, but more remarkable in a way. William 
Tomkins has a number of good stories and one 
parody that keeps the audience In good humor. 
George McKay and Rose Fredericks again offered 
their sketch, "Fun at a Ball Game," In which 
they please with their singing and dancing. Joe 
Whitehead and Grierson Sisters have a comedy 
singing and dancing specialty. Whitehead Is a 
good comedian, also a clever eccentric dancer and 
the success of the act Is due entirely to his own 
work and the ginger he injects into it. although 
the sisters are attractive and dress well, but do 
not add much strength. The McCarvers, colored 
singers and dancers, offer a new act, but some 
of the talk should be replaced by singing or danc- 
ing. Otherwise the team can compare with the 
average. Too much time Is wasted by Chas. 
Ledegar in his comedy rope walking act. He gives 
a good performance. Gonzalez Brothers have good 
voices and make a picturesque appearance in 
Mexican costumes. The "La Paloma" duet does 
not Mend harmoniously. Patty Brothers, equi- 
librists; Mr. and Mrs. Jack In a comedy sketch; 
Rena and Ar.ora, acrobats, and the Klnodrome com- 
plete the bill. 

OLYMPIC (Alio Jacobs .mgr. for Kohl & Cas- 
tle.). — Joseph E. Howard and Ida Emerson made 
their first vaudeville appearance in two years and 
Le Brun Grand Opera Trio, also newcomers at 
this house, are under New Acts. Lew Hawkins, « 
Chicago favorite with more new than old material, 
scored a decided hit with the audience. Gardner 
and Revere introduce baton Juggling, singing and 
dancing, including some jokes heard before, but 
the act made a good impression, particularly the 
songs rendered by the women with guitar accom- 
paniment scoring heavily. Lasella and Vernon 
company have a pantomime In which trapdoors ore 
prominent. They are good pantomlinlsts, but the 
act contains nothing new or novel. Hendrix and 
Prescott are excellent dancers and have good stage 
presence. Imhoff, Conn and Corlnee, In a sketch, 
"The Doings of Dr. Lander," have an old vehicle 
and the many laughs It creates are credited to 
their own work. Dick Lynch with his comic illus- 
trated songs, monologues and dancing Is delightful 
and was liberally applauded. King Kolllns knows 
how to play the banjo and his selections pleased. 
Philbrooks and Reynolds In "Miss Steno" intro- 
duce some good comedy, sinning and dancli.g. 
Others are Elena Gardner, itnptrsonations and imi- 
tations; Jas. and Cells Welch, the Plerres and Sis- 
ters Clarkson. 

TROCADKKO (I. M. Welngarden. mgr.). Man 
ager Weingarden has exceeded the "feature" limit 
this week In offering his patrons two extra at- 
tractions In addition to the regular |terfornian< e 
given by the stock company. They are Battling 
Nelson in a three-round bout and "The Girl In 
Blue" in graceful evolution. The burlesque, "On 
I'.oard Ship." Is a musical melange, staged re- 
splcudently In musical comedy style and embel- 
lished with handsomely costomed girls and effec- 
tive musical numbers. Nat Fields as chief pur- 
veyor of humor got more out of the part than It 
afforded, while Nat S. Jerome as a Hebrew isllor 
shows Improvement and good Judgment in elimi- 
nating portions of crude material, adapting him- 
self more closely to methods pertinent to the char- 
acter he portrays. J. W. Sherry as a naval cap 
tain plays the part well, but hl9 delivery lacks 
conviction. Ed Morris In grotesque makeup hardly 
looks the psrt of an Irishman, while Leo Kendall 



takes advantage of the opportunities offered. 
Flossie Levari lustily plays her part, but is impos- 
sible as a singer. Nellie Kenton is attractive. 
Connie Ward is buxom and alert In a musical 
uumtier, while May Curtis contributes her share of 
good looks and sprlghtliness and should sing In the 
same spirit. 

SID J. EUSON'S (Sid J. Euson. mgr.).— The 
curtain raiser Is called "Trip Around the World" 
by the stock company. Several musical numbers 
are effectively rendered and the costuming calls 
for more than ordinary notice. The closing bur- 
lesque, "Angelo Marble," Is given over almost 
entirely to dialogue and action, the musical end 
having been curtailed for some reason. Some of 
the situations are Intentionally exaggerated by the 
comedians to force suggestive features above medi- 
ocrity, and they succeed in their purpose, pleasing 
the audience to laughter and applause. Harry 
Harvey In a Hebrew character is good. Carl An- 
derson Is also good in makeup. Dick Bro.vn Is 
ludicrously funny, but some of bis work Is too 
crude. James Thompson has no conception of his 
part and does not seem to care how he plays It. 
Some of the liest lines lose their value through 
his enunciation. Mile. Amato is a handsome young 
woman, has a good voice, pleasing manners and re- 
finement. She should stick to long dresses. 
Camille Kenyon acts her part well, but her sing- 
ing U a failure. Some of the minor parts are 
fairly cast. Ruth Everett abandoned her "auto- 
matic doll" outfit, appearing In a sensational 
lance with muscular movements. In the olio Jack 
Irwin offers an excellent monologue, the "prize 
fighter" recitation scoring heavily. Brothers De 
Van and dog are fair acrobats. Doyle and Granger 
are good dancers, but their talk is cumbersome. 

FOLLY (John J. Fennessy. mgr.).— The Folly 
Burlesquers, a stock company, opened for the 
summer season tinder the management of Joe 
Uppenhelmer. Louis Daere heads the contingent 
of women and Murray J. Slmms is leading come- 
dian. 

WHITE CITY (Jaul J. Howse. mgr. .— Chics- 
go's greatest resort continues to attract thousands 
of amusement seekers dally, the attendance the 
past week being unprecedented in summer amuse- 
ments. One of the new attractions this week is 
Eph. Thompson's troupe of trained elephants giving 
an exhibition in open air. Cameroma in his "Slide 
for Life," executed on a tight wire at a dizzy 
height, furnishes a sensation. The Fire Show and 
Jewell's Manikins attract attention. A Trip to 
Mars, Chicago Fire, Otto's Anlmnl Show, Midget 
City and the Coasters are popular. The Banda 
Hosso, stationed In the centre of the pla/.a, alter- 
nates its musical numbers with La Bolssiere's 
Orchestra, placed In a stand erected at the other 
end of the plaza. In the theatre the bill Includes 
a number of good vandevllle acts. 

SANS SOUCI PARK (Leonard Wolf, mgr.).— 
An Igorrote village has been Installed, with a 
number of tattooed and clouted savages. A novel 
marriage ceremony will take place during the 
week when two Igorrotes are to be united In wed- 
lock, according to the rites and customs. Oresta 
Vessels and his Banda Boma continue to please the 
crowd around the pavilion. In the vaudeville the- 
atre are Barry and Barry, Belle Gordon, Hallen 
and Hiyes, Murray K. Hill and Morris Silver. 

RIVERVIEW PARK (Wm. M. Johnson, mgr.). 
— Large crowds continue to pour Into this North 
Side resort, where numerous attractions are di- 
verting and attracting unusual attention. The 
Jungle. Ostrich Farm and the fireworks spectacle, 
"The Fall of the Golden Gate," are abundsntly 
patronized. 

CHUTES. — The management has secured a new 
and unique feature in Miss Elter, who appears as 
a mermaid and makes the Chutes lake ber abode. 
The other attractions and Pozzl's band afford 
good amusement. 

NOTES. — Wilfred Clarke and company passed 
through here en route to Oconomowoc. Wis., where 
they will spend a vacation of one week. They 
open at the Chutes. San Francisco, June 24. and 
are lswked solid for three years. Clsus and Bad- 
cllffe in a new comedy sketch entitled "Iky's Re- 
ception" will play their first Western time next 
season, having been booked by the Western Vaude- 
ville Association. The ten-cent vaudeville theatre 
recently opened at 120 South Clark street by Chas. 
.1. Carter closed owing to lack of patronage. Erie 
and Loo have concluded their time in the West 
and will rest for the summer at their home In 
Kdinhurg. Ind. Ilm La Salle Theatre closed for 
the summer months and will reopen early in 
\ugust with a new musical comedy by Hough, 
Adams and Howard. FRANK WIESBERG. 



EASTON, PA. 
ISLAND PARK (D. B. SeGulne, mgr.).— Bill 
week 14 played to big business. Chas. Nelson 
Height and Liura Dean, farcical sketch, "A Mis- 
lit Meeting," well received; Lambert and Pierce, 
blackface comedians, went big; Miss Inez Mccus- 
ker. late soloist with Sousa's Hand, a singer of 
rare accomplishments; Qulgg and Mack. Irish 
comedians, poor; Houston and Dallas, comedy jug- 
glers, are above the ordinary and went big. 

MAC. 



OLOVERSVILLE, N. Y. 

FAMILY (Fred De Bondy. res. mgr). Week 
11: Max Brooks and Sadie Vedder In "Not Yet, 
but Soon," vry clever, hit; Ida Kussell, eccentric, 
good; Irs Ressner, illustrated songs, fine; Faust 
Family, acrobats, excellent. NOTE. The rustic 

theatre at Sacsndaga Park will open July 2. Two 
shows daily during the summer. 

THE AISI.i: SKAT FIEND. 



J0HN8T0WN, N. Y. 
CBLORON (J. J. Waters, mgr.) Week 11: 
Vernot!, the ventriloquist, takes the honors, his 

work lieing ttulj remarkable; Frank Bush tells 
stories and Is as funny as ever; Columbia Comedy 
lour, comedy and songs, good; I/llllan Ashley also 
tells stories and sings, and Mullen and Corelll, 

acrobats, conclude the bill. NOTE. — Cold 

weather Is Interfering with the attendance at this 
bouse. L. T. BERLINKB. 



SKETCHES 



WRITTEN TO ORDER 

ANY STYLE FOR 
ANYBODY 



ALSO 



SONGS ind PARODIES 

HARRY DILLON 

Roim 633, Knickerbocker Theatre BKfy. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
WONDERLAND (H. A. Dorsey, mgr.), which 
opened May 27, after delaying the ceremony one 
day on account of impossible weather, began its 
third week with everything in its favor and a 
vast crowd present to participate In the annual 
Municipal Night, the mayors and aldermen of 
Minneapolis and St. Paul being in evidence as 
guests of the management. The outdoor attrac- 
tions for the week are the Four Flying Moores in 
an aerial act that would never set the world on 
tire; William Conuers with a fair ttoundlng wire 
act, and Sweet and Allen, comedy acrobats. Water 
has been turned on the chutes Incline. Other 
money-getting devices are the Johnstown Flood, 
Hale's Tours, Infant incubator, airship swing, 
merry-go-round, Third Degree, electric theatre, 
Arcadia, Palace of Illusions, scenic rallwiy, Old 
Mill, House of Nonsense and miniature railway. 
The Minnesota State Band, which opened the park, 
has been succeeded this week by the Helntzman 
Military Band, with Duss' Band to follow 17. 
F. C. Camp, of St. Paul, Is business manager, Mr. 
Dorsey dividing bis time between here and Domin- 
ion Park, Montreal. Smith Hall is in bis recond 
season as press agent. The completion of the 
Selby interurban makes Wonderland a Twin City 

park In fact as well as In name and location. 

CHAPIN. 



MONTREAL, CAN. 

DOMINION PARK.— 10 saw big attendance. 
Duss Band Is held over and Is s big feature. The 
Bottomley Troupe, aerlalists, have a sensational 
casting act and a big hit. This park covers fif- 
teen acres, is lighted by 30.000 electric lights, 
has all the latest park amusements and manv 

pike shows. RIVERSIDE PARK (Al B. Rlai. 

mgr.). — 10 saw fine bill with rather light attend- 
ance. The Three Armstrongs, comedy and sensa- 
tl« nal cyclists, are making big bit. This Is their 
first engagement at parks In the East. They 
e\|M-rlenced the San Francisco earthquake. Nes- 
sen. Hunter and Nessen. jugglers and hoop rollers, 
great; Hellman, illusionist; Rlmm, Bomm, Brrr. 

novelty musical artists, are all good. SOHMER 

PA UK (I<avlgne A Lajole nigra.). — 10 saw good 
bill, with usual big attendance. Lavtgne's band 
concert went big. Colonial Septet held over and 
went well. Sam Watson's trained animal act Is 
funny and goes big; the Four Melvins. hand-to- 
hand acrobats, present a sensational act; Drlscnll 
and Kenna are good In Illustrated songs. 

AL M. PRENTISS. 



NEWARK, N, J. 

PROCTOR'S (R. C. Stewart, mgr.).— Week 12: 
This house will keep open all summer and as the 
week has been pool the crowds were very large. 
A good bill Introduced Julius Steger and company, 
Including Julie Heme, Forrest Robinson and Tony 
Pearl in a new musical playlet entitled "The 
Fifth Commandment"; Dells Fox is always wel- 
comed here; Lillian Bender In violin solos, good; 
Ben Beyer, comic cyclist, food; W. A. Mortimer 
and May Dwyer In "The Imposter," pleased; 
Willie Weston in his Imitations went well; La 
Maze Brothers, comedy acrobats, and Smith and 
Campbell, rapid fire conversationalists, were the 

laughing hits of the show. ELBtTTRIC PARK 

(C. A. Dunlap, mgr. ).— Week 12: The crowds as 
big as ever. The ballroom, electric fountain, with 
the living pictures and the outdoor spectacle. "Mt. 
Vesuvius "(under Summer Parks) are features. 
At the Rustic Theatre are the Arlington Comedy 
Four; MeCauley and Donovan, comedians; Ooffortb 
and Doyle, drums and batons; Wm. Whittle, the 
ventriloquist, made a bit with his new talking act; 
Josle Antoinette, a very charming singing come- 
dienne, handsomely gowned, proved that her sing- 
ing was as good as her personal appearance. 

HILLSIDE PARK (Wm. R. Thaller, nmr.).— Week 
12: Olive Swan, equestrienne, still continues to 
draw the crowds; Cupid, ridden by Miss Sw in. 
and Nebraska Bill's trick horse Punch are hits, as 
well as Mamie Fisher's "Slide for Life." The 
Roller Boiler and the balloon ascension of Prof. 
Archie OrllUn seem to have taken hold. OLYM- 
PIC PARK (Hans Weaves, mgr.).— Week 2: The 
AbOrU Opera Company produced "Said Pasha" this 
week and highly pleased the large audience at- 
tending: Chas. W. Phillips as the Pasha. Dick 
Jones a« the Rajah «nd Qua Ysnfh as Hassan Bey, 
Orace Orr Mvers as Serena and Marlon Chester as 
Ballsh Sojali were ve:> good In their rrsjiectlve 
roles and the singing of ItertlS Dale was quite a 
pleasant surprise, as this lias been the tlrst time 
she has had a part Where she could display her 

talents. NOTE.— The "Hollsappel" Olrls, May 

and Marjorle, of this city, will shortly enter the 
vaudeville Held with a new and unique singing snd 
dam in-' set. They will carry a special scenic set- 
ting and the dancing will 1m» a feature. 

JOB O'BRYAN. 






! 



12 



VARIETY 




CONTRALTO 



Taylor 



Trocadero Theatre Stock Company for the Bummer. 



Address TROCADERO THEATRE, CHICAGO. 



— ALV1IN BROS.-— 



World's Greatest Comedy Ring Gymnasts. 



Tony Pastor's, New York, June 18-28. 



KLEIN s CLIFTON 

. PRESENT THEIR NEW NOVELTY ACT, 
•*THa* DUVIMY'S HOLIDAY •• 

Produced for the first time at Poll's, New Haven, June 4, and a bit; success. S(>ectal drop and 
handsome costumes. Copyrighted. Now booking time for next reason. Permanent address, 80S W. 
S9th street, New York City. 



SHOES 



FOR STAGS, EVENING AND STREET WEAR. SOLE AND EXCLU- 
SIVE OWNER OF BERNSTEIN SHORT VAMP AND STAGE LAST. 
Even - thing In footwear pertaining to theatrical productions. 

WILLIAM BERNSTEIN, 

Tel. 568 Mad. 509 Sixth Avenue, near 31st Street, New York. 



HARRY 



IDA 



SALMON <a CHESTER 



Australian Entertainers in their London Coster act. 



Week June 18— Keith's, Cleveland. 



Come along, whether you boost or knock— come along. We want your opinion. 

PASTOR'S NEXT WEEK. 

Murphy, Whitman ® Co. 



In their rural sketch, "OLD FRIENDS.' 



FRANK 



TWO 



SILVESTOS 



FLORIA In their great novelty act. "Rag's and Oil" 

Invite offers for next season. Address care VARIETY, 
Chicago Office, 79 S. Clark Street. 

Absolutely the best dressed act of its kind. 



BAL 



PROFESSIONAL 

TRUNKS 



TAKE YOUR DOG ON A PULLMAN. 

We make the only dog case that will beat the 
Pullman porter. Send for Catalogue Y. 

WILLIAM BAL (inc.), HO W. 40th Street 



NEW BRIGHTON, PA. 

JUNCTION PARK THEATRE (S. Hanaur, 
uigr.).— <Tbe park theatre opened 11 with a fairly 
good bill. "Senator" Frank Bell, monologue, bit 
of the bill; Eraser troupe of dancer*, good; Musl- 
< m1 Adams, good, and Maxsmlth Duoi ladder act. 
fair. The rest of the bill was fair. C. V. I). 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

ATHLETIC PARK (Archie Cox, mgr.).— Week 
U: "Pis a pity that such clever people us Dolan 
and Lenharr should have such a loosely construct- 
ed sketch as "A High-toned Burglar." Ethel Oil- 
key opened weak but struck the applause centre 
toward the finale. Zampa, musical novelty, needs 
some new selections. Clayton Jenkins and Jaspar 
presented their "Darktown Circus." Business 

fair. WEST END PARK (Thos. S. Winston. 

mgr.). — Week 10: La vine and Leonard have added 
a railroad crossing and a tinfoil shirt front to 
their automobile act. Fredericks Family are re- 
viewed under New Acts. Lopes and Lopez of- 
fered their musical act unchanged. Count De 
But*, and Brother presented their excellent bicycle 
act. Business Is excellent. Pictures closed. Bill 
17 contains Anna Franklin, GUllban and Perry, 
Fredericks Family and Lavlne and Leonard. 

O. M. SAMUELS. 



their musical act and pleased, but the style of 
their act is almost as old as the blacksmith shop 
they sing about. The Alpha Trio, hoop rollers, 
were new. This act could be much improved, the 
attempt at rural comedy by one of the number 
being very sad. The hoop Juggling is good. The 
Melanl Trio, in their Italian street singing act, 
and the Flood Brothers were familiar here, while 
Jessica Cree, whistler and singer, and Carl Her- 
bert, a magician, were new and filled out the bill. 

Stock burlesque to thrive in three of the four 

houses. TROCADERO— Emma Weston, Billy 

Hart, Elliott LeBlalr and Elliott, Frank Riley. 
Marlon and Pearl and Mae Taylor appea-ed In 
specialties in addition to the burlesque numbers. 

BIJOU — Two lively burlesque numbers were 

given and McDevitt and Kelly, Barlne nnd Tu- 
renne, Margaret Baxter, Edna Davenport and oth- 
ers introduced specialties. LYCEUM — John 

Conly, Emma Zeph, Margie Hilton and others put 
on the burlesque numbers with numerous musical 
specialties. The Cain Sisters, Mabel Emerson and 
others appeared In specialties. KINKS. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

KEITH'S (H. T. Jordan, mgr.).-- Robert HI11- 
iard repeated "As a Man Sows," which Is not as 
good as his others. All the action In the sketch 
remains for the melodramatic finish, In which one 
of the characters dies while bis life Is being 
threatened. The offering is not up to the stand- 
ard expected of Milliard and his players. "For 
Reform" has been given here often enough to 
warrant a souvenir performance, but it still wins 
applause. Hugh Stanton and Florence Modena arc 
responsible. A troupe of cleverly trained terriers 
were shown by one who is given the simple hilling 
of "Jacob" on the program. Johnnie Stanley, 
.formerly of Stanley and Brockman, and Grace 
•» Leonard were seen for the first time as a team 
and they made good despite the fact that they bad 
all the worst of the position on the program. 
Smlrl and Kessner scored one of the principal hits 
of the bill. Niblo and Riley, who are billed as 
eccentric dancers, were the third dancing team In 
a row and there was nothing to justify their being 
given preference over the other two acts. Their 
comedy was weak and their dancing only ordinary. 
Patrons of Keith's old BIJou Theatre In Its early 
days of prosperity will remember George Diamond 
as a frequent visitor as a ballad Blnger. Diamond 
appeared for the first time in the Chestnut street 
house with a partner named Smith, the two offer- 
ing an Illustrated song act, with Diamond doing 
the singing. There was one song about a rose and 
the usual "kind applause" songs with a soldier 
and a fireman as the heroes, but the picture acts 
are a novelty here and Diamond and Smith did 
very well. Ray L. Royce returned with his char- 
acter monologue, which is good enough for those 
who have not seen him before. A change la need- 
ed badly. The rejuvenated Quaker City Quartet, 
with John Healy as the comedian, appeared In 



PITTSBURG. PA. 

THE GRAND (Harry Davis, mgr.).— Edwin 
Stevens Is assisted by pretty Miss Marshall In his 
clever skit, "A Night Out," Involving some humor- 
ous dialogue and good songs. The Four Fords, 
who were here earlier in the season, have added 
some new effects to their splendid dancing act. 
A unique and dainty act. "Jack and Jill." Is --on- 
trlbuted by Arthur, Mildred and Stella Boylan. 
The two youngsters are unusually clever and hand- 
some. Charles Case still talks of his paternal an- 
cestor and was much applauded. Arthur McWat- 
ters, Grace Tyson and company give a composite 
entertainment. Miss Tyson's imitation of Marie 
Dressier was exceedingly good. Winona Winter, 
"The Alabama Ro3ebud." was bewltchlngly pretty. 
Tom Brown and Siren Nevarro, two colored enter- 
tainers, pleased. The Yamamoto Brothers, Japa 
nese sensational wire and perch artists, give a 
thrilling turn, rendered the more so by a heavy 
fall which the smaller one received Tuesday mati- 
nee. He plucklly finished the act on the pole, 
.lowever. Mile. Edna, the whistling girl, pleased, 
and Salmon and Cheater, The Tossing Austins, 
Henry Carroll and Nellie Francis, Viola and Engel 

»nd the pictures round out the bill. At WEST 

VIEW PARK immense crowds are att.-ncted by 
Dannhart's Second Brigade Band. The aerlalists, 
the Le Mars, are also there this week. Picnics 

and dances are held every day and evening. At 

KENNYWOOD NIrella's Fourteenth Regiment 
Band and Frank Dumont's Minstrels are attract- 
ing good crowds. At CALHOUN PARK the 

Pan American Minstrels present their entire bill, 
including a first part with songs and monologues 

and a good olio of up-to-date specialties. 

DREAM CITY Is attracting big crowds and the 
concerta by the Cosmopolitan Band are much 

liked. At LUNA Webber's Band, with Blanche 

Mehaffy as soloist, still holds on. Frederick In- 
gersoll has contracted for the production at Luna 
Park of Frank C. Bostock'a menagerie and hippo- 
drome. A small army of workmen is now busy 
making the alterations that will be necessary In 



k 




•• 



MUMMING BIRDS" or 



"A Night in an English Musio Hall" 

(ALL RIGHTS LEGALLY PROTECTED.) 
USUAL GREAT HIT AND GETTING THE MONEY BACK. ORPKEUM WESTERN CIRCUIT. 



June 11 — San Francisco (Chute*). 
June 18 — San Francisco (Chutes). 
July 2— Olympic, Chicago. 
July 9— Majestic. Chicago. 
July 23— Proctor's, Albany. 



July 30— Proctor's, Troy. 

August 0— Proctor's 23d St., New York. 

August lit — Proctor's, Newark. 

August 20— Proctor's 58th St. 

August 27 — Hammersteln's Victoria Theatre. 



All communications address ALF. REEVES, Manager en route 




F.X.HENNESSY 



IRISH UNION PIPER 



SCOTCH HIGHLAND PIPES 



rXHCNNESSY 



and Violinist (musician). 

Permanent address, MILITARY HALL, 198 BOWERY, NEW YORK, 

or your agent. 

P. S. — Tbe Irish Union Pipe is recognized as Ireland's national musical 
instrument — novel and rare — a good drawing card. 




LILLIAN MAYNARD 



DAINTY SINGING COMEDIENNE. 



IN VAUDEVILLE. 



ADDRESS KEITH BOOKING OFFICE. 



FOR SALE 

WIGGINS FARM 

Apply to THE CHADWICK TRIO. 



ARTISTS DESIRING TIME 

Pleas* Writ* to 

GEORGE MANAGER 

HOMANS SOUTHERN 

Mmmmm 

M. Y. 






MLLE. MABEL'S 

A Mill A I C The Act that 

A II I III M L O Always Pleases 

The tiny little girl, the big baboons and 
monkeys, the well trained dogs. 

Most beautiful animal act in vaudeville. 
Most beautiful and graceful animal per- 
formers, varied and beautiful costumes. 

Handsome props. Some open time this 
summer. 

Permanent Address 
340 S. FRONT ST., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




KIETY 



KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDINQ, NEW YORK CITY 

CARDS OP ARTISTS 

UNDER THE HEADINO OP 

"REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS" 



1-2 Inoh olngU oolumn, 

1 Inoh 
1 -2 Ineh double oolumn, ■ 

1 Inoh " 



AT FOLLOWING RATES: 



• 92.00 monthly. Not 

4 00 " ■ 

• 4.00 ■ " 
730 " " 



the buildings of tbe park that are to house the big 
show which la expected to move In some time 
during July. MADAME PITT. 



BAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

ORPHEUM (John Morrisey, res. mgr.).— Week 
4: Argenantl Trio, Foster and Foster, Francellas, 
Elizabeth Murray, Bailey and Austin Company. 
Katherlne Dahl, Carson and Willard, Valerie 
Bergere and company and motion pictures. Fair 

business. GREATER NOVELTY (Lul>elskl A 

Loverich, mgrs. ). — Joseph Calahsn, MIllo Brothers, 
Lonle Bates, Mabel Howard and pictures. Capac- 
ity business. NOTES. — The Orpheum is not get- 
ting the business it had on O'Farrell street. The 
afternoon performances are very poorly attended. 
The Orpheum management has announced that it 
will move to Its new theatre near Fillmore street 
as soon as the building is completed. B. D. C. 



THEATRE (E. Brooker. mgr.).— The Toys, musi- 
cal artists; McAleer and Lyons, singers and dun- 
cers; George Ryan, comedian; Jack Franklin, il- 
lustrated songs; Rlordan and Bryon in a funny 
sketch and J. Lyons, wooden shoe dancer. Mr. 
Brooker Is giving the West Enders the worth of 
their money and his pretty place of amusement is 

Incoming well known. The STAR Is closed for 

the season. HARTLEY. 



TROY, N. Y. 

AL-TRO PARK (Max Rosen, mgr.).— Many Tro 
Jjmis are finding the way to this park. It is one 
of the most pleasant amusement resorts in this 
vicinity. The various attractions provide enjoy- 
ment for large numbers dally. The free show Is 
an attractive feature and many excellent acts are 
presented. J. J. M. 



ST. PAUL, MINN. 

WILDWOOD (H. M. Barnet. mgr.).— Opened 
June 9 to a good attendance. Phalcn Park opened 
season 0, miniature railway and balloon ascension 
being principal features. The Aork on the New 
Orpheum is progreslng satisfactorily. The doors 
will undoubtedly be thrown open to the public 
the middle of September. Carl Hagenbeck's 
greater show is billed for July 8. Street car 
facilities have been Improved to such an extent 
that St. Paul patrons of Wonderland are attend- 
ing this amusement park in droves. 

B. F. ROBERTSON. 



TORONTO, CANADA. 

HANLONS POINT (L. Solman. mgr.).— De 
Kota, the magician, good; George and Huntington, 
good; Jennie Faron, well liked; Stuckland and 
Ihikesbury, pleasing feature; Watson Sisters, sing- 
era and dancers, good; SUNNY8IDE SUMMER 



WORCESTER, MASS. 

LINCOLN PARK (Sanford Wallin, mgr.).— 
Week 11: Golden Gate Quintet head a fine bill 
this week; McGrath Brothers and Page In a 
musical act were very good, as were the Qulgley 
Brothers; Francis Wood, hoop roller, was well 
received, and the D'Elmer Brothers In an acro- 
batic act made a good finish. PINEHURST 

PARK (J. F. Donovan, mgr.).— Mitchell and Dun 
stan's Minstrel* are holding forth here this week; 
James Jackson, contortionist; Scott and Johnson 
In a singing and dancing act; the Students' Quar- 
tet and the musical act, "Uncle Jasper's Holi- 
day," form a creditable olio. WHITE CITY 

(F. II. Blgelow, mgr.). — Lester Brothers, acro- 
bats; Wtnur Sami, magician, are the free attrac- 
tions this week and all are doing well. NOTES. 

— Owing to trouble with the musicians' union. 
Manager Irwin has installed a mechanical band 
In the Lincoln Park skating rink. Nellie Mason 
is making a hit singing Illustrated songs at Poll's 
and Amy Allen Is doing likewise at the Park. 

HARLOW L. STEELE. 






\ 



VARIETY 



13 



VAUDEVILLE AGENTS 






WILLIAM MORRIS 

1440 BROADWAY, Corner 40th St., NEW YORK 

Telephone 953, »54. 955 Bryant. Cable Addreaa. Wlllmorrla. 

CHICAGO OFFICES 167 Dearborn Street 



SPECIAL ATTENTION WIL L BE GIVEN TO SUM MER PARKS AND FAIRS 

Booking for the Representative Vaudeville Theatres of America 

Booking Exclusively the Following Leading Vaudeville Houeeei 



P. 0. Williams' Colonial. 
P. O. Williams' Orpbeum. 
P. O. Williams' Alnambra. 
P. O. Williams' Orpbeum, Boston. 
P. O. Williams' NoTelty, B'klyn. 
P. G. Willlsms' Ootbam. B'klyn. 
P. O. Williams' Bergen Bescb. 
P.O.Williams' New Bronx Tu'tre. 
Henry Myers* Doric. Yonkers. 
Henry Myers' Atlantic City. 
Henry Myers' Doric, Camden. 
Keeney's, Brooklyn. 
Bijou. Belolt. Wis. 
Godfrey's. Grsnd Rapids. Mich. 
Green's Op. Hm., Cedar Rap's.Mlch. 
West Side, Janesvllle, Wis. 
Morrison's, Rockaway. 
Delmllng's, Rockaway. 
International, Chicago. 
Hippodrome, Cleveland. 
Mannlun's Park, St. Louis. 
Cedar Point, Sandusky. 



Hammersteln's Victoria. 
Hammersteln's Roof Garden. 
Hammersteln's, Philadelphia. 
Sbeedy's, Fall Ulver. 
Sheedy's, Newport. 
Hatbaway's, New Bedford. 
Hatha way 's, Lowell. 
Hathaway's, Brockton. 
Bijou Theatre, Omaha, Neb. 
Bijou. Lincoln, Neb. 
Gennett's, Richmond, Ind. 
Grand Op. Use.. Decatur, 111. 
New Savoy, Hamilton, Ont. 
Electric Park, Toledo. 
Electric Park, Detroit. 
Electric Park, Cleveland. 
Electric Park, Baltimore. 
Athletic Park, New Orleans. 
Olympla Park, Newark, O. 



Wllmer and Vincent, Otlca. 
Wllmer and Vincent, Reading. 
Wllmer and Vincent, Allen town. 
Weber and Rush, Bingham ton. 
Weber and Rush, Schenectady. 
H. H. Lamklu's, Toledo. 
H. H. Lamkln's, Dayton. 
Katzes' Auditorium, Linn. 
I. C. Mlsbler, Altoona, Pa. 
I. C. Mlsbler, Johnstown, Ps. 
Msnhattan Beach, Denver. 
Cook's Psrk, Evansvllle. 
Forest Park, Little Rock, Ark. 
Brltannla-on-tbe-Bay, Ottawa, Ont. 
Chester Psrk, Cincinnati. 
Woolworth's Rf.Gdn.Lancaster.Pa. 



West Side Park, Muncle, Ind. 

IN. D. It le Important that artists send their open time to 
both the New York and Chicago Offices 






Tel. MI7 Bryant. Gable, "Control," Haw Tork. 

The Agents' Agency 

CLIFFORD C. FISCHER 

1440 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 
HOLLAND BUILDING. 

B. BUTLER BOYLE. MATHIAS R. TUFTS. 

THE BOYLE AGENCY 

, INTERNATIONAL 
VAUDEVILLE AND DRAMATIC 

•1 Wast Slat Street, NEW YORK. 

Cable Address, "ButleboyI," New York. 
Tel. 4070, Md. Sq. 

IDA CARLE 

Vaudeville Agent, St. Jamee Building. 



Tel. 0054 Madison. 



ln$ersoll& Hopkins Co. 

lltt BROADWAY, V. Y. CITY. 

Amusement Park Agents 



Tel. 1187-1188 Madison. 



Cable, Myersba. 



MYERS-KELLER 

General Vaudeville Agents 

31 West 31st Street, New York 

•Phone, 2032 Medlaon 

REICH, 

PLUNKETT 
* WESLEY 

ST. JAMES BUILDING 

Subscribe now 

■nd bo sure of 

VARIETY 



BORNHAUPT USSy*™"* 1 - 

St. James Bldg. Tel. 4004 Mad. Sq.. New Tork. 



CHAS. ESGHERT 

with Al Sutherland. St. James Building 
Booking only good acta. 



Anything There's a Dollar In 

JACK LEVY 

140 West 42d St. Mew York 

H. B. MARINELLI 

NEW YORK PARIS LONDON 

Cable, Cable, Cable, 

"Helferslch" "Uptodate Paris" " Bra vissimo— London" 

HOLLAND BUILDING, 1440 BROADWAY. 
TELEPHONE: 8084 BRYANT. 

FRANK MELVILLE 

KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING 

SUMMER AMUSEMENTS % 

CONSTRUCTION AND THEATHICAL 
ATTRACTIONS 



Pitrot&Girard 

IntenutionAl Vaudeville Afante. 
1263 Broadway, New York 

TaL. eftM aaaaaWfc 

W.J.PIimmer 

Exclusive booking agent for all attractions play* 
Ing the Empire Circuit. Address Knickerbocker 
Theatre Building Annex, Rooms 720 to 787. 



PASTOR'S 

14TH ST.. 3D AVE. CONTINUOUS. 20 A 30 GTS. 
NEXT WEEK, MONDAY, JUNE 18, 1900. 

PRINCESS PAULINE ro £ $ T £ R « S 

DIXON, BOWERS AND DIXON. 
THE FOUR 8ULLY8. 
Hensliaw & Pransloll. \a Centra & La Rue. 
Marshall, the Mystic. Murphy, Whitman & Co. 

The Kiltie Trio. 

As a Special Feature! 
JULIET WOOD AND COMPANY. 
The Alvln Brothers. Sid Baxter. 

Laurance and Grace The Block ton Art IIlus- 

Sylvester. trator. 

OBborne A Wallace. The American Vltagraph. 

And, as an added attraction! 
INMAN. WAKEFIELD AND COMPANY. 



GlGLER 

Tailor 



6 West 29th Street 
NEW YORK 



ALVIENE'S 

Vaudeville School if noting 

AMD 

Isttttiti if Stage Dancing 




Grand Opera House Building 

23rd SI. and Eighth Ave. 

New York City 



Largest and most suooeseful 
school of the kind la Mew York. 

Now acta rehearsed snd whipped Into shape. 
Vaudeville acta, dances, sketches, etc., taught 
1,000 successful pupils now on the stage. Send 
for illustrated booklet. 



SOMETHING NEW. 



SOMETHING NEW. 



Lambert * Williams 

Singing, Danoing, Talking Aot, 

"OUT SHOPPING." 

Now booking for summer parks. 

All agents invited. 

J. Bernard Dyllyn 

(Late of "The Earl and the Girl" Company.) 
"Oh, George, tell them to cut," 
That was the cry of Majnilre; 
But the more he said "No" 
aiiey said "Cut his dough," 

And the slash went a little bit higher. 
MU8I0 BY THE ELEVATOR BOY. 

Laura Ordway 

ENGLISH CHARACTER COMEDIENNE. 
Week of June 11th— Keith's Union Square. 

THREE MITCHELLS 

Vaudeville Favorites 

FAREWELL AMERICAN* APPEARANCE. 
EUROPE, 1907. 



HAMMER STEIVS TIE AT HE 
ICTORIA VAMETIES 

Next Week m ZSZTS2S:„ JUNE 18 

Prices, 25c, 60c, 75c & $1 00. Mat. Every Day, 56r A 60c 



V 



Til 

Mirv lout 



Jill T. 
ud Evi 



LAST WEEK OF 

FAYS 

(ADEPTS MYSTIC) 
SIX MUSICAL CUTTYS. 

TOM HEARN. 
THE SPOOK MINSTRELS. 

LALLA SELBINI 

RICE AND PREVOST. 

COLLINS AND HART. 

BERZAC'B COMEDY CIRCUS. 

CAMILLE TRIO. 

THE DANCING WILSONS. 






COMING, JUNE 85, 



MACHNOW 

The Russian Glsnt. 
Actual Height h, Feet 2% Inches. 




GREATER N. Y. CIRCUIT 




Alex. Steiner 

VAUDEVILLE AQENT 

Booking Forties Mi Ha tiro Act*. 



t. J 



National Hotel 

(EUROPEAN) 
Van Buren Street and Wabash Avenue, 

CHICAGO 

The Home of Vaudeville Artists. In vioinity of 
all theatres. Modern, up to date. Write for rates. 

D. A. DOOLEY, Prop. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

OP HIGH CLASS VAUDEVILLB THEATRES 

M. MBYERFILD, JR.. Proa. 

martin BECK, General Manager. 
PRANK vincbnt. N. Y. Representative. 
All Applications for Time Meat ha iaOraaaad to 
a ■. BBAY. Bookiag Manager, 
Majeetto Theatre BlAg.. Ceieage, IB. 



JUGGLING THORNS 



Have) returned from Mexico after cloning a 
successful run with Orin Bros). Circus. Open 
time after June 18th. Regards) to all friends. 

Permanent Address, 58 Rose St., Buffalo, N. Y. 



Amusement Booking Association (•■••) 



JOHN F. McORAIL, President and General Manager. 

CHA8. E. ELLIS, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Vaudeville, Dramatic, SX^IS'VBK 

724726 Chicafo Opera ILuse Block, CHICAGO, U.S.A. 



When answering advertisement 8 kindly mention Varictt. 



14 



VARIETY 




A HEADLINE ACT! 

UNA CLAYTON SK 

DTOLUDINO 

FRANCIS MOREY and MARIE GEBHARDT 

IN THE ONE-ACT COMEDY, 

"WHAT'S IN A NAME?" 

BY JACQUES FUTRBLLE. 
m # ; • The hit of the season at the Dominion."— Winnipeg: (Men.) Tribune. 

"Come again." — Manager Kobold. 

MAJESTIC, CHICAGO, JUNE 18-84. OLYMPIC, CHICAGO, JUNE 86-JULY 1. 

LONDON "MUSIC HALL" 

tSht Great English Vaudeville Paper (W,*Kly) 

401 STRAND. w. C. 

American RcfrocotatiYC— Miia Id* M. Carle, Room 708, St. Jamci Buildin,, when a 
lil« of HF Ire can be ■**• and adacrtiaamentt will at raccirea 



AMEKICANB COMING 10 LONDON 8H0DLD ADVERTISE III THE 

Theatrical . Sports Review 



The office Will always welcome Americani. 



OATLEY m CRAWLEY, Proprietori. 



Offices, 61 Green Street, Leicester Square, London, Eng. 



BEET A. DOEMAN, Editor. 




WE CARRY THE 
LAROE8T AND MOST 
VARIED STOCK OF 
DICE IN THE WORLD. 

Try oar new TRANS- 
PARENT, INVISIBLE 
SHAPES, nee as many 
ss 700 wish, let Player 
•elect any 2. 

PRICE PEE PAIR. 
11.10. 

BICYCLE PAPER, $9 per doe., beet on earth; 
Block Oat Ink also, for line work, per bot., 
$1.60; CHICAGO SET SPINDLE, $20; Roulette 
Wheeli complete, 1,000 Harris check*. $186; 
Check Cop. the Poker Players' beet friend, $8; 
Harris Inlaid Checks, any design, per M, $22. 
Send for our new cut-price catalogue. Free. 
JD8T OUT. 

H. C. EVANS & CO. 

1 26 Clark St., Chicago. 



Princess Chinquilla 
and Newell 

PEE ADD. JAMAICA, L. I. 

Week June 4 th. Hurtig A Seamon's. 

First time in New York since Australian tour. 

The Child 

Theatrical Trunk Works 

$18 EAST 9TH STREET, NEW YOEX. 
Bend for Catalogue F. 

Q ancing H owards 

ARTISTIC SINGING diid DANCING EXPERTS 

July $th— J. X. Burke's Circuit of Parks. 

Have some time open in June. 

ADDRESS ALL AGENTS. 



IA/ALTBR 



McPherson 

You Need Me in Vaudeville 

Management JACK LEVY, IAO W. 42d St. 





1 


[ ~ THE A#> 1 


MsM=l 


\ 


FLRD N05S MGR ^ 


M 


u 


179 W. 47th St. 

NEW YORK 


\ 


zl 



William Gould 



AND 



Valeska Suratt 

Address Eccentric Club, London, W. C, until Sep* 
tember 1st. 



Cable address, "Eeichplunk.' 



VAUDEVILLE •KEADLINEflS 



AND 



6000 STANDARD ACTS 

If you hare aa odd open weak you want to til at 

short aotioe wriU to W. L. DOOXSTADEE, 

Oarrlek Theatre, Wllmlngtoa, DeL 

Can cloee Saturday night and make any city aaat 

of Chicago to open Monday sight 

BELL and HENRY 

"THE SLEEPY MAN/* 
Will shortly arrive la Amarloa, 



Look at this Combined Machine 

STEREOPTICON AND MOVING PICTURES IN ONE. 




Designed especially for the Show Buainees. All data, It Is absolutely the BEST and MOST POWERFUL 

maohia* on the market. 

SEND FOR FULL PARTICULARS 
NEW YORK STAGE LIGHTING CO., 14S East 23d Street. New York 



1 ^^^^^^W^^^^^M^^WV¥«¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥V¥¥¥V¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥f 



! 



TAPESTRY LEATHER 
SOUVENIR SPECIALTIES 



TAPESTRY LEATHER PILLOW 
CUSHIONS 

front and back stitched, complete with fringe, 
$9.00 per doi. 

TAPESTRY LEATHER POST CARDS 

$16.00 per thousand. 100 designs. Bend for 
a sample order of 100 cards. $1.60, postpaid. 

ART TICKING PILLOW TOPS 

contain 15 catchy and beautiful colored de- 
signs. Burnt leather effect $2.60 per do*. 

THE "BOOTIE" PURSE POST CARD 

In tan or white, a winning souvenir for any 
locality or place. Catchy designs, blank space 









for name. Burnt leather effect. Big sellers. 
Order now. $9.00 per gross; 85c. per doc, 
postpaid. 

JULIETTE POST CARD PURSE 
"JUST OUT" 

a novel and attractive souvenir, with local or 
comic views, entirely new and original. Space 
also for Initial. Price $18.00 per gross. Send 
for a sample dos. $1.50, postpaid. 

A COMPLETE ALPHABET 

1 Inch, fancy letters, brown Ink and pad, for 
stamping post cards or purses. $1.75 the set 

Complete catalogue of specialties 
sent upon request 



THE SOUVENIR PILLOW TOP GO 



320 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK 



< 
< 



< 
< 



< 



• 



hA * AA ******* AAAAA * A - AAA *»** AAAAAA i AA a s a i a i a s a b a m * i i a i * " \ " rSV^VVV^ i ^j-uuij 




JVeiv 
Richmond 

Hotel 



(EUROPEAN PLAN.) 
EUBON'S THEATRE, northeast corner Clark and Kinile streets, 



OHICAOO, ILL. 



A. 7. FLYMV, Prop. 



Everything new. Running water, steam heat, telephones in all 
rooms; elevator service. Light breakfsst served in rooms free of 
charge. Make my hotel your home when in Chicago. 



BAL 



PROFESSIONAL 

TRUNKS 



They're made of fibre. Your money back if 
trunk don't suit you. Can you beat it! 
Send for Catalogue V. 

WILLIAM BAL (inc.). HO W. 40th Street 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 






VARIETY 



15 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



PHILADELPHIA UNANIMOUSLY 



N 



WILLIAM COURTLEIGH 



& CO. In "UNDER THE 

Philadelphia Press: The leading feature at 
Keith's Chestnut is the first appearance la this 
••ity of the favorite actor, William Courtlelgb, In 
his new protean play, "Under the' Third Degree," 
written for him by Campbell MacCulloch. Mr. 
Courtlelgh appears In eight different character 
parts, the scene being a private office in a New 
York police headquarters at night. These charac- 
ters represent a variety of types, mostly charac- 
ters of the street. Mr. Courtleigh'a finished art 
was shown depicting these, making each distinct. 
They proved that besides being an actor he has 
made a most careful study of human character. 



THIRD DEGREE*' 

He was capably assisted by John Dillon, William 
R. Randall and John Roache. 

Philadelphia Inquirer: Precedence must be given 
to William Courtlelgh and bis supporting company 
In "Under the Third Degree" In the review of the 
program offered at Keith's yesterday. Mr. Court- 
lelgh essayed no less than eight distinct and well- 
drawn character portrayals, and, with a possible 
exception, he was convincing In all. His work 
was clean-cut and artistic. The playlet, which la 
well constructed, savors somewhat of one that 
was Introduced In New York recently by a foreign 



is doubtful if be achieved a greater element of 
success. The story is woven around a mysterious 
case of arson and the action takes place In a 
police station, the witnesses of various nationali- 
ties being brought before the lieutenant to give 
their evidence, which practically — circumstantially, 
at least— convicts one Jim Warner, a mechanic, of 
having set fire to the house. When told that his 
child had perished he breaks down and confesses. 
A wide range of character work was done by Mr. 
Courtlelgb, and he was ably assisted by William 
R. Randall, as the Inspector; John Dillon and 
John Roache. 



actor who interpreted as many characters, but It 

M. 8. BEINTHAM, Agent. 



By F*. C MacCULLOCH 

Philadelphia North American: How good In the 
amusement way vaudeville can be Is shown In the 
current bill at Keith's Chestnut Street Theatre. 
One of the best features was a new playlet, 
"Under the Third Degree." performed by William 
Courtlelgh and several able assistants. It tells of 
a case of Incendiarism In which a police Inspector 
examines eight witnesses, a politician, a German 
groceryman, an Italian, a Chinaman, Jew, Irish 
officer and others, who testify concerning the 
crime. Mr. Courtlelgh performs these latter ntt* 
merous characters and hia rapid changes of cos* 
tume, make-up and natural personation of the 
parts are as remarkable as they are artistic. 



AT LIBERTY 





No relation to Anna 



BLACK FACE MONOLOGUE, SONGS AND PARODIES, VAUDEVILLE, MINSTREL OR BURLESQUE 

Would Aooept Stook Burlesquo for Summer fOY EAST THIRTY-FIRST STREET 



BOSTON JOURNAL, JAN. 25. 
Versatile Chap. 
The comedians at the Columbia this week are 
all entitled to the prefix "versatile." Wilbur 
Held, when he last appeared In Boston, was one 
of the big cards in Johnny Ray's play, "Down the 
Pike." aud his make-up and Imitation of that star 
as the Janitor will live long in the memory of 
those who saw that production. In the show at 
the Columbia, this week, he Is tirst seen as a 



young Irlsbmau with ambition to shine in society; 
In the olio he does a "coon" turn, and it proved 
to be one of the best of its kind seen in Boston 
this season, while in the closing farce his imper- 
sonation of a "hobo" nobleman would put a smile 
on the face of a sphinx. 

Not alone is Mr. Held versatile In impersonating 
different characters, but he is also one of the best 
singing comedians on the stage. When with the 
Rays he did the bulk of the singing, and this 



week he has a varied selection of songs which are 
highly pleasing. "Starlight' 'is one of the biggest 
of this season's song hits snd its great popularity 
is due to the effective manner in which it is ren- 
dered by this singer. It is in tbe nature of an 
Illustrated song, but tbe chorus girls remain on 
the stage, which makes it pleasant to hear and an 
artistic and dainty picture to gate upon. Come- 
dian Held has a few spicy psrodles, too, which be 
sings in the olio. 



DETROIT FREE PRESS, FEB. 19. 

Wilbur Held offers a blackface monologue and 
sluglng act which went with a whoop, his paro- 
dies being new and better than the average. 





WASHINGTON STAR, OCT. 81. 
The olio, however, brought out several pleasing 
turns, particularly noticeable being a monologue 
turn by Wilbur Held. 







Season 1906-07 



VAUDEVILLE 

"HAM TREE" CO. 






Second Season 



- » 



OFF TO CALIFORNIA 





a nd 

Al Jolson sends Best Regards to 4 Huntings and Rooney Sisters. Will see "J" in I,os Angeles 

Communications care VARIETY, Chicago office, 79 S. Clark Street. 

Bowers. Walters and Crooker 



THE 3 RUBES 



WEEK OF JUNE 18 BRITANNIA ON THE BAY OTTAWA, ONT. 



BE IN F*. 



ELLA 



GRIINNELL *™R GARDNER 

lLat* Of Thompson And Dundy's Hlppodroma) 

WILL MAKE THEIR VAUDEVILLE DEBUT JUNE 25tH, AT YOUNG'S PIER, ATLANTIC CITY 
Mmnmg*m—t LOUIS WESLEY j REIOH, PLUHMETT A WESLEY, St. Jmmmm BulMImm 

Antoinette Le Brun 



Prima Donna 

FRITZ N. HUT I MANN 
Tenor 

JAMES F. STEVENS 
Barytone 

— IN— 

"IL TROVATORE" 



L e Brun Grand Oner a Trio 



SPLENDID SUCCESS I IN VAUDEVILLE. 



$1,500 PRODUCTION. 



ENCORED EVERYWHERE. 



BOOKED SOLID. 



Permanent address care VARIETY, Chicago Office. 79 S. Clark Street. 



Andy Lewis 

PAST SEASON LEADING FEATURE SAM DEVERE'S OWN COMPANY. 
P. S.— YES, MAUDE ELLIOTT RETURNS TO THE FOLD. 



NAT S. JEROME 

"OUR YIDDISH FRIEND" 

Playing- Hebrew Comedy Parts in Stock at Trocadero Theatre, Chicago, for the Summer. 
WILL CONSIDER OFFERS FOR NEXT 8EAS0N. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



16 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



liVt 



L. E \AJ 



COLLINS 



AND 



HART 



CARRYING THE ONLY CAT MUSICIAN IN TBI WORLD - The later on the bill the better we go. Now closing tbe (how 

THIRD SEASON ON HAMMERSTEIN'S ROOF GARDEN 



A HUMOROUS. ENTERTAINING NOVELTY. 
(A REAL CHINAMAN— NOT A FAKE.) 



LEE-TUNG-FOO 

WORLD'S ONLY CHINESE BARITONE. 

Singing American, German and Chinese Bongs. J one 11 — Hammerstein's Roof Garden. 



NAT 



Fields 



A 



SOL 



D 



Fields 



With T. W. Dinkins next season. Putting on both shows. 

Thanks to managers for offers. 

Address PIELDS AND FIELDS, Care T. W. Dinkins, Knickerbocker Theatre 

Building, New York. — 



WB PREDICTED A WINNER AND HERE IT 16 

FRANCES SWARTZ & CO. 

Presenting Her Sensational Dramatic Success in Vaudeville entitled 

"THE END" 

For time address: Frances Swarts A Co., care of Lee B. Orabbe, 113 West 2d St., Davenport, Iowa. 

JEANNE BROOKS 

"The Girl with the Smile." 

Booked Solid Summer Season by William Morris' 

Chicago Office, 167 Dearborn Street. 



A REAL GENUINE HIT IN \f AU OE \/ I LLE 



The Sexton 



9 




Dream 



SCORED 

MANAGEMENT, LOUIS WESLEY, 



AT HURTIG & SEA MOM'S WEEK OF JUNE 4TH 




Tom 



STILL 





NEW YORK 



Playing on Hammersteln's Roof, Commencing Jane 18 



ORIGINAL! 



ORIGINAL! 



ORIGINAL! 



JOSEPH K. WATSON 

Next Season, TWENTIETH CENTURY GIRLS 

Direction Maury Urease 

Hoffman writes my talKing material 

Joseph K. Watson writes my singing material 



HOWARD 



DOLLY 



POWERS and THEOBALD 

" Tho Human Doll and Ho* Bomu" 

ENGAGED WITH MB. 0U8 KILL COMING SEASON. Address care VARIETY. 



REICH, PLUNXETT ft WESLEY, ST. JAMES BUILDING. 



CHAS. 



Leonard Fletcher 

IN ENGLAND. 

Address, 401 STRAND, LONDON 



Jock 




AT LIBERTY for Burlesque 

JUST CLOSED AT SID 7. EUSON'S, CHICAGO, TO WHOM I REFER. Play any part and do 
STRONG SPECIALTY. Sing ins;, talking and danoing. Finished successful season on Kohl and Castle 
and Orpheum oircuits. Address oars VARIETY, Chioago Office. 79 S. Clark St. 



ITALIA 



The Dainty Singing and Dancing Comedienne. 
SINGS HER OWN SONGS IN VAUDEVILLE. 

ADDRESS - - WM. MORRIS 



Henry Clive <& 

William Gould 

Present 

Management LOUIS WESLEY 




^ 



T n)wwt 



V>he Mysterious 
Chinese Automaton 

THE ACME OF ILLUSORY 

CREATION, TREMENDOUS 

SUCCESS 



REICH, PLUNKETT & WESLEY, ST. JAMES BUILDING. 



VARIETY 



17 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



— 



MARVELOUS 

MOST WONDERFUL GYMNASTS I 

HA/V\MERSTE11N'S PARADISE 

BOOKED feOMP SEASON 1908-07 Qy 7V. ^^ F^ r? ^fr ££ 





I THE WORLD 
GARDENS NOW 



EXCLUSIVE AGENTS 



CHAS.&MISSJACAHEARN 



4- 



Comedy Unicyclists and Bicyclists Extraordinary 

ADDRESS ALL AGENTS OR NEW YORK CLIPPER. 



CHERIDAH SIMPSON 

IV VAUDEVILLE. 
»* W 87tb It.. Mew Tork. 



BELL and HENRY 

"THE SLEEPY MAN," 

Will shortly arrive in America. 



BEAU IDEALS OF VAUDEVILLE: 



JOHN 



EMILY 



DELMORE & DARRELL 



BOOKED 80LID FOR THE SUMMER. 



NOW BOOKING FOR NEXT SEASON. 



Melville Ellis 



ORIGINAL PIANOLOOUE. 



Chas. 




■ 



& CO. 







Season of '06 and '07 Complete 



Address Princess Theatre 
New York City 






WM. MORRIS, Agent 



Time all filled 



SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT! 

Rice and Cady 

Bobby North 

Edward F. Gallagher 



(OF GALLAGHER ft BARRETT) 

Playing a 30 weeKe' engagement in Weber 
tions at Mason Opera House, Loi 



nd Fields* pro«l«ic< 
lee, Cal. 



"THE ATHLETIC GIRL" 



BELLE GOR 



• 10 




WEEK JUNE 18— WONDERLAND PARK, INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



CHARLES 



HAIGHT b DEAN 



LAURA 



Presenting "A MISFIT MEETING" 

A FEW MORE BRICKS BOLD LAST WEEK. 



u 



IN 



ElIINdE 



An International Triumph 
A ROYAL. HIT AT* THE 

PALACE, LONDON. 

N. S. BENTHAM 0. ■. H ARRAS. 

Personal Manager 
ED MARKUH. Press Representative. 



Harry Holman 

The polite comedian with the red suit who reads the rhymes out of the 
red hook is at Pastor's next week. Come have a look. What timet Don't 




know. Perhaps you'd hotter bring your trunk. 



GEO. P. MURPHY, 

German Comedian 



Jr 



Re-engaged next season. 
FEATURED MANAGEMENT CAMPBELL ft DREW. 



E 



I I 



IE LEONARD 



HAS SIGNED FOR TWO YEARS WITH LEW DOCKSTADER'S MINSTRELS AS A SPECIAL 
FEATURE. Management Chas. D. Wilson. Many thanks to vaudeville managers for their kind offers. 



THE WORLD'S 
FAMOUS 



Mardo 




OOMINO EAST. Or on from Smmtmmboi* Wth. For time and term, address REiOH. RLUNKETT & WESLEY, St, Jmmmm Bldg.. Room 1024 

h/ A#w sue we* it%t i^iMM ti§tnnQnit iiw dTa esessf'iofi Vi 



18 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



THE REAL 

PARODY 

ACT 



GET THEM AT THE START. A SCREAM IN THE MIDDLE AMD A SURE FIRE FINISH. 

CHAS. and FANNY VAN 



OUR BOSOM FRIENDS 



MYERS A KELLER 





THE BANDIT 



His own melodramatic success. Now booking season 1008-07. 
Week Jane 18, Majestic Theatre, Chicago. Addresa all communica- 
tions oars "Variety," Chicago Office, 79 8. Clark St., or my sols 
agent, Mr. Edward Hay man, Western Vaudeville Assn., Chicago. 



THE GREAT ROSAIRE 

DIRECTION BOYLE AGENCY 
31 WEST 31st STREET - • NEW YORK CITY 



Mr. Fred Karno's comedy co. 

"A Night in an English Music Hall" 

Manager, UF. RBBVES. Areata, Wm. MORRIS and H.B. MARINELLI 



Notice to Proprietors, Managers and Others Interested 

The sketch is the property of and was produced by Mr. Fred 
Karno in iondoi, and all rights are legally protected. Infringe- 
ments of same will be immediately dealt with. 



HOW PLAYING GREAT ORPHEUM CIRCUIT. 



-NOTICE- 



THE BIRO ACT 

LAMONT'S 
TRAINED AUSTRALIA COCKATOOS 



HOW BOOKING PARK TIME. 



Address UNION HOTEL, 117 Randolph St., CHICAGO, ILL. 



"THE MUSICA'. LAUGH MAKERS" 



FRED 



ECKHOFF and 




ANNA 



TWENTY.FOUR MINUTES 
MUSIO REAL OOMEBY 



SOLID LAUGHS AND APPLAUSE 



AWAY FROM ALL OTHERS 

Address REICH, PLUNKETT « WESLEY, 1133 Broadway, N. Y. City 



PRESS WORK, DOES IT PAY? 

ASK THE STARS— SOME FOR 
WHOM I'VE WORKED. 



£r*m 



TeaMaoaV 
f ord. Veil* Barren, 
rnomas Q. Ssabrsoks, Annie Irian 
Jennnette Lowris, MabslU Oilman, Irons Bentler 
ElSs Taj, Mrs. Ysamana, Estslls Wsntworth, Cherinah fflmfon. 
Amy Ricard, Edna Goodrich, Jeanette Dupree, Eltinge, Eddis Leonard. 
Oarlstsn Mnoy, Mauds Hall, Louise Allen Collier, etc. 

31 West 31st Street, New York 





"THAT BAD BOY" 



»» 



Prevoli "■ U „B" 



AND HER 
B LEVER DOG 



ZAZA 



CHAPEAUGRAPHI8T. MAGICIAN & SHADOW- 
GRAPHIST PAR EXCELLENCE. 



ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO 

9S1 GARDEN ST., HOBOKEN, V. J. 



in a "Night in an Kngliah Musio Hall. 



World's (ire-test tog Ponder 

Seeback 

Week June 18— Renwiok Park, Ithaca, H. T. 



SHEPPARD CAMP 

" THE MAR FROM BEORBIA" 



May Ward 

Mmw York'm 
Fmvorlte Comedienne 

L eona J hurber 



AND HER 



4 BLACKBIRDS 

Booked solid Season 1000-7. 
Direction M. S. Bent ham. 
Pickaninnies Singing Gorman. 

JEANETTE DUPRE 

HOTEL NAVARRE. HEW YORK. 




Whm ssowoWiif s <»or » .eaoios t o kindh mmUom % 



VARIETY 






19 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



"THE GERMAN MILLIONAIRES" 

ADAMS-EDWARDS"* 

In a pot-pourri of GERMAN COMEDY and GRAND OPERA (not burlesque, but real singing) 

also Featuring Mr. Adam's BONE SOLOS and FIVE STYLES OF WOODEN SHOE DANCING 




ONE OF THE BEST DRESSED COMEDY ACTS IN VAUDEVILLE 



Booked by Western Vaudeville Association, Mafestlc Theatre, Chicago. Ask Jake Sternad 

PERMANENT ADDRESS, OARE VARIETY 9HIOAOO OFFIOE, 79 S. OLARK 



BESSIE VALDARES 

TROUPE OF CYCLISTS AND UNICYCLISTS 

SMARTEST DRES8ED AND MOST REFINED BICYCLE ACT BEFORE THE PUBLIC. 

IDA CABLE. REPRESENTATIVE. 

Harry W.Spingold&Co.(4) 

Are engaged for the production of "CAPTAIN FOUR FLUSH" for next season, with Harry W. Spin- 
gold in the title role. Address care VARIETY, Chicago Office, 79 8. Clark Street. 

Have Your Cord in VARIETY 



AL. SHEAN— WARREN, CHAS. 



IN THEIR ORIGINAL TRAVESTIES 



QUO VADIS CAPT. KIDD 

PER ADD., SI CHESTER STREET, MOUNT VERNON, N V 

Season 1907-8 Starring under direction of Percy Williams. 

MIKE BERNARD 

Pianist at Pastor's Theatre 

Cam aeespt other engagements. Club work especially. Address ears of Pastor's Theatre. 



OUT W EST 




HARRY JOLSOIN 



"THE GHETTO SPORT" 



The Clever 
Singing 
I Comedian 



Harry Jolson, wbo presents a Hebrew monologue at the Family tbis week. Is something away from tbe stereotyped way of portraying a Hebrew character. 
His way of delivering his monologue did not seem to tire his audience. He finished with a burlesque imitation of an Italian singing Miserere from "II 

Trovatore" that brought down tbe bouse.— The Butte Miner. Permanent Address, care VARIETY. Chicago Office, 79 S. Clark Street 



THE GERMAN POLITICIAN 

CLIFF GORDON 



ORPHEUM, LOS ANGELES, JUNE 10-17. 



CHUTES, SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 24-JULY I. 



CALL ! 

Reward will he paid to all managers and agents for the capture- of the laugh-making 



HEBREW COMEDIAN 



HARRY HARVEY 

At Sid J. Euson's Theatre, Chi cago , for the summer; at Liberty for next season. Musical comedy or 
burlesque. Address care WESTERN OFFIOE OF VARIETY, 79 B. Clark street, Chicago. 

NOW BOOKING FOR NEXT SEASON 

THE 
GREAT 

"The Magician Who Draws the People" 

IB AN ENTIRELY NEW PROGRAM OF MAGIO MOW IN PREPARATION. 




CLIFF E BERZAC 

The Laughter Maker 



A&KHT, H. B. MAKIHELU 



EDDIE SIMMONS 



Will 

appear 



shortly Canorfi ft Dailav •*> thalr latest 
sar with Dinal A DallBf efferlng.'Teny" 



ceo &DUPREE 



Libby 

mmrmmn Om 



by Frmmk Kmmnmdy 



ALLAN 




Premier Manipulator of the World 

Returned from Australian Triumphs. Unique, Refined, Artistic Novelty. 
Address, 1193 Broadway, Room 9, New York City. 

Week June 10— Fountain Ferry Park. Week June 25— Majestic Theatre, Chicago. 111. 

Week June 17— East End Park, Memphis, Tenn. Week July 9 — Olympic Theatre, Chicago, 111. 



The 





4 



SISTERS AND BROTHERS THE DANCING STARS 

Have closed a very successful season with the great Orpheum Road Show. Are booked solid for 1906-7 under the management of Mr. Kohl, of Kohl and Oaetle. 

When e/newerin§ advertisement* kindly mention Vasxstt. 



20 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



6- M OWATTS-6 



ASOIN l»0« RINOLINO BROS.-BB/iaON 1907 EUROPE 



THE SINGING SENSATION ! 

MaudeRockwell 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO. NEW YORK SHORTLY. MANAGEMENT CHRIS 0. BROWN, 67 B. 

CLARK ST., CHICAGO. 

TIM McMAHON'S GIRLS 




SUMMER ADDRESS: 12 3D STREET, B0RDENT0WN, V. 7. 



Willie Weston 

THE POCKET EDITION OF THE PEOPLE HE IMITATES. 
Exclusive Agent, AL. MAYER, St. James Bide BOOKED SOLID. 



James F.Dolan. Ida Lenharr 

Presenting Mr. Dolsn's Original Farces, 

"THE WIRE TAPPER," "TAKTHO CHANCES," 

"THE HIGH TONED BURGLAR," "A BIT OF TRAVESTY." 

PERMANENT ADDRESS, 257 W. 111TH ST., NEW YORK. 




NYE 



Assisted 
by bis 



ROLLICKING GIRLS 



Roland West 

PROTEAN ARTIST 

BIG HIT AT HURTIQ & SE ANION'S 

Management of LOUIS WESLEY, 

Reich, Plunkett A Wesley, St. James Building 

L4UY SEVILLE 



Europe for summer. 



ENGLISH COMEDIENNE. 
Open Keith Circuit September. 



IDA CARLE, Representative. 



THE MAPS 
WITH THE 
BO U IN G - 
ING HAT® 






Management JACK LEVY, 1 40 W. 42d Street 



Arthur Rigby 

"PURVEYOR OF FUN" 

EH ROUTE SULLIVAN-CONSIDINE CIRCUIT 



NOIA/ I COMB 



LEW ADAMS 

GERMAN CHARACTER COMEDIAN. 

Last season playing- W. B. Watson's part of "Krsussmeyer" with Washington Society Girls. 
OPEN FOR FARCE, COMEDY OR BURLESQUE. ADDRESS CARE VARIETY. 

Royal Musical 5 



TON 

10TTA 

AND 

■ UffORD 




e 



3 HYLANDS 



PRESENTING A COMEDY SINGING, DANCING AND MUSICAL ACT. 



Introducing Master Hyland, the only child Baton manipulator In tbe world. Managers wishing a good 
feature act for next season. Per. address, 28 Osborne St., Danbury, Conn. 



P. W. 





Blossom 



KEITH and ORPHEUM CIRCUITS 
commencing September 



REICH, PLUNKETT A WESLEY 
ST. JANES BLDG. 



1006 -7 



MANAGEMENT SAM SCRIBINER 



DRAMATIC SOPRANO. 




Louise 




Replacing Miss Wilson, of STANLEY A WILSON. 
PERMANENT ADDRESS. 64 W. 6STH ST., HEW YORK CITY. 



tyjkjsft gin Mtrm Jmm mdtum timmm^mmt* sWsMswTir g»s^ sHrisM V 

re PWVVj — --■— ^■ r ^ w ^*W ^^sFar^aj V sap •■■Vfttf WfVf^rw aaWPvP ff^W ▼ - 






VARIETY 



21 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



LUCY 



AND 



LUCIER 



in their Comedy Sketch "THE FOOL'S ERRAND" 

Just closed a successful season on the Orpheum, Hopkins' and Kohl & Castle circuits. BOOKED SOLID FOR NEXT SEASON by J. J. 
lutdock, J. Sternad and Ed. Hayman of the Western Vaudeville Association. Majestic Theatre Building. Chicago. 

Address care VARIETY. Chics so Office. 79 8. Clark St. 



OUR ROUTE FOR NEXT SEASON. 
Sept. 8— Keith's, Clereland. O. 

" 10— O. O. H., Pittsburg, Pa. 

" 17 — Chase's, Washington, D. O. 

" 24— Maryland, Baltimore, lid. 
Oct. 1— Keith's, Philadelphia. Pa. 

" 8— Keith's, Prorldence, R. 1. 

" lb—Keith's, Boston, afaas. 

" 22— Moore'a, Portland, Me. 

" 29— Keith's, New York City. 
Nor. — O. O. H., Syracuse. N. Y. 

" 12— Temple, Detroit, Mich. 

" 19— Moort'a, Rochester, N. Y. 

•• 26— Shea's, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Dee. 3— Shea's, Toronto, Can. 

" 10— Travel. 

" 17— Majestic, Chicago. 

•• 24 — Haymarket, Chicago. 

" 81— Columbia. St. Louis. 
Jan. 7 — Olympic, Chicago. 

" U — O. O. H.. Indiana doIIh. 

" 21— Columbia, Cincinnati. 

" 28— Hopkins', Loularille. 
Feb. 3 — Hopkins', Memphis, Tenn. 

" 10— Majestic, Little Rock, Ark. 
Other dates to fellow. 



The Celebrated Comic Opera Star 

MISS VIRGINIA EARL 



AND HER 



JOHNNIES 



WHEELER EARL 

The Butler 
FRANK GARFIELD 
JOS. W. HERBERT, Jr. 



ALBERT L. PELLATON 
ED. T. MORA 
HARRY L. TIQHE 
Accompanist 



Stmged toy ED. ROGERS. 



ch.. E INNESS & RYAN «••<•' 



JOOKED SOLID. 



PLAYING THE WESTERN PARKS. 



AGENT, JO PAIGE SMITH. 





MAC ART 



AND CO. 



t( 



The Man From Macy's 



n 



BY WILL M. CKESSY AND IEA DODGE. 



Opening Week of Jnne 18th, PROCTOR'S THEATRE, ALBANY 

Mmnmgemcnt of LOUIS WESLEY 
REIOH, PLUMKETT * WESLEY, - - St. Jmmmm Building 

Send 50 Cents and have VARIETY 
forwarded to you for three months 
during the summer. 

WILFRED CLARKE 

Assisted by MISS THEO CARCW A CO. 

Presenting; His Sketches 

NO MORE TROUBLE and WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT 

ADDRESS, LAMBS' OLUB 



AT LIBERTY NEXT SEASON. 



PHILBROOKSiREYNOLDS 

PRESENTING 

"MISS STENO. STENOGRAPHER" 

A GERMAN COMEDY SKETCH. 
d preparation a comedy act la one. Addrsaa WM. MORRIS. 



Hal Godfrey & Co. 



o 



PRESENTING NEXT SEASON 



red Mm 



AND 
THE 




VOW BOOKING NEXT SEASON. 



THE LIAR" By Edmund Day UNO "A VERY BAD BOY" By / rthur Lamb 

Two of the few standard sketches in Vaudeville. 

Address all communications to REICH, PLUNKETT A WESLEY, exclusive agents. 

Irving Trio 

Direction JACK LEVY, 140 W. 42d Street 



WILLIAM 




(Late WjitH RICHARD CARLE) 

Creator of The Eph-oph-soph-alos of " The Storks "; A. Grouch In " The Explorers "; The Hindoo In " The 
Forbidden Land"; Chinaman In "The Tenderfoot"; and The Song Book Boy In "The Mayor of Tokio." 

Begs to announce that he has severed his long and friendly connection with Mr. Carle to enter VAUDEVILLE. 

Particulars later. Address, Care VARIETY, Chicago Office, 7Q S. Clark Street. 

Wkm ansumvnf •dwrUmim+nti kindly mention VAAOTY. 



22 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




BEATRICE McKENZIE 

Supported bv WALTERBSHMNOII and CO. 

Is Lew H. MewoomVi deli»btiul miulotl pUjUt, "A MONTANA BEAUT," in vaudeville. Have e 
few imki open. AUrw oare Variety, Ghioafo offloe. 79 B. Clark St. 

THE DANCING WONDERS 

MCK LILLIAN 

BROWN I WRIGHT 

GREATEST NOVELTY BINOINO AND DANOTNO ACT XV VAUDEVILLE. 



Frank 



McCREA and POOL 



Roy 



SENSATIONAL SHOOTING ACT 

OPEN CHALLENGE TO THE WORLD SHOOTING AT A HUMAN TARGET. MO ONE BARRED. 
Addreea AL MAYER, Boom 110, St. Jamea Buildin*. Booked solid until Juno, 1907. 



Si Brooks and tee Jeanette 



"ON THE MAIN 



14 Mlautoo In Oao 



STREET " 

loot Address. 20 E. 113th Street 



THE BLACK ACT 



JACK WILSON & CO. 



ALBERT GREEN 



-LN- 



"AN UPHEAVAL IN DARKTOWN" 

10 MTNUTEB IN ONE- ABE MYERB A KELLER. 

Week June 18— Brighton Baaoh. Week June 86— Keith's, Philadelphia. 

WMk July 8— Keith's, Boston. 



OPPBR8 INVITED 



SADIE 



BROOKS andllVEDDER 

I lb Hint. GmiIt Mtitlli "KIT VET 7 T T IUT SMI" 

104 W. 401k ST., HW TOtI CITT FINISH IN ONB 



COLLINS 





In an 
"AFFAIR OF 



If 



An Kntire New Offering 
in the Dutch Field. 





GERMAN DIALECT COMEDIAN. 



CLARK 

CLOSED SEASON WITH MINER'S AMERICANS. 



AT LIBERTY for BURLESQUE or FARCE COMEDY 

Minneapolis Tribune: "E. A. Clark 1b An old favorite, who makes the m ost o f his line* and 
keeps the audience In sn uproar." ADDRESS 245 W. BOTH ST., NEW YORK CITY. 

THE MUSICAL BELLBOY AND MILITARY MAID. 

freo GRAY and GRAHAM nellie 

FEATURING "ORIGINAL SCOTCH FINISH." 

"«"• THE MUSICAL BRENNANS — 



MUSICAL ENTERTAINERS. 



PERMANENT ADDRESS, CARE OF VARIETY. 



Eugene and Willie Howard 



(HOWARD 



HOWARD) 



Willie Howard is the Original Hebrew Messenger Boy 

WEEK JUNE 18— KEITH'S UNION SQUARE. BOOKED SOLID UNTIL JUNE, 1908. 

DIRECTION 07 MYEBS * KELLER, 31 W. BIST ST. 




Mme. Anna Plum. 



OPERA TRIO 

Signori Tortorico and Busbi. 



In oondensed versions of "II Trovatore" sad "Faust" trios. 
sfrHssIt Grand Opera Singers who have fang 1 in Grand Opera. 
Sot— rj sad oostome changes. IDA OBBTJC, Representative, St. James Building-. 







TO LET by our only agents MYERS & KELLER, " n^V^k !1t R y EET 



VARIBTY 



23 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



q— 







Edward Blondell 

Address William Horrlt 

EMMA FRANCIS 

sf Arabian Whirlwinds 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

pimcnow or as. a. mmmm 

RICE & PREVOST 



IN 



BUMPTY BUMPS 

Arthur J. Miss Grace 

McWATERS ... TYSON 

In a Spectacular Musical Comedy 
"VAUDBVIbbB" 

WmjTOEll- O. O. H., PITTSBURG. 
WEEK JUKE 18— TEMPLE, DETROIT. 

D UNEDIN T ROUPJ 

WORLD-TAMED MARVELLOUS 

ARTISTIC and ACROMTIC CYCLISTS 

Introducing Cycling on the Telephone Wire. 
Challenge the world to And their equal. JAB. E. 
DONEOAN. Managing Direotor. Permanent ad- 
dreee: Forepaugh A Belle Broe.' Shew. 

SLOfif BROTHERS 

Variety's Greatest Comedy Cycle Act 

Oonolndlng with a eerlee of noeee, aooompanled by 

a monologue by FRED ST. OHGE. 

Agent. WILLIAM MORSXB. 




SIGNED WITH BOB MANCHESTER FOR NEXT 
BEABON, 

JOE EDMONDS 

""* Batt?"* Vaudeville 
LOUISE DRESSER 

Cha.raLctenatic Songs 





F. Daly Burgess 

GOMEDIAN 

And Ml. Do*, - ri IN IN EGA IN 

In Vaudeville 

THI RIAL GERMAN COMEDIANS 

ields-Wolley 

"A TRIP IN AN AIRSHIP." 

Week Juno 4, EUotrio Park, Baltimore. 

ED. F.REYNARD 

Ventriloquist 



Seaeea 1901 8— Great Laf ayotte Show. 



100 ~ .( Prlaaroao aad 
1WP »*— \ Mimetrele and 



ExolualTO Agont. WILLIAM MORRIS. 

Browning 

IN THEIR NEWEST COMEDY SKETCH IN ONE, 

ENTITLED 

"GOING INTO VAUDEVILLE." 

BIG KIT PASTOR'S THIS WEEK. 

BILLIE RITCHIE 

"The Drunk" 

A Night in an Bngli.h Music Hall 



10 MINUTES IN ONE. 



HELSTON 1 0LLA-H00D 

SINGING. DANCING. COMEDY 



IN VITB OFFERS 
NEXT 8EASON 



IN STOCK 
RIVERSIDE PARK. 
BOISE CITY. IDAHO. 



1906 



1907 



CHARLEY HARRIS 



THE INSPECTOR. 
THE GIBSON GIRL. 
St MINUTES LAUGH— 1. S, 1. 
Late ef Marrle A Walter.. 



JACK INORWORTH 

Preaenta TliB COLLEOB BOY 

whm% a ass»aHa# aslpayf i ps a iaaa j kindly mention VardJyy. 



Too Hoi io Work 

SAM RICE 

121 W. 95TH ST., MEW YORK OTTY. 

V. P. WOODWARD 

Uambourine Juggler 

OPBN TIME ADDR888 MORRIS 



CHA8. S3. 



LILLY B. 



Colby-- May 

The Ventriloouist and 

The Dassia* Ball 

In Europe (or One Year. 

Playing Rot urn Date* Everywhere 

Par. Add. 90 Wellington St. Strand W. a. 
London, England. 



VERSATILE. 



Chain 



(TWO) 



Alice 



Shrodes 



RENTED 



JOE 



HAYMAN 



and 



FRANKLIN 



In "r\ SUIT rOR DIVORGB" 

Mow playing In England. 

WILLIAMS 

AND DIXEY 

In Their Laugh Provoking; Effusion, 

"A MAKESHIFT BENEFACTOR." 

Permanent Address; 817 W. 16th St., Pity. 

A. H. WOODS 

Can nee eleter nets and eketch teame for 

Mas* 



<iEO.W.IIUSSfi(a(0. 

VEHTRILOQUIAL COMEDY. 

BURROWS -TRAVIS (0. 



WEEK JUKE 4— BAYONNE. K. J. 
JUNE 11— VERPLANK. N. Y. 



NAGEl ADAMS 



NOVELTY AND COMEDY DUO. 



Gartelle Bros. 

SKATORIALISM 



AGENTS TAKE NOTICE. 



S35 



e 



ZARELLS 



EUROPEAN EQUILIBRISTS— SOMETHING NEW 



Ross - Vack 

OERMAN COMEDIANS 

Permanent address, 11 West 114th at., Vow York. 



i(?w/He 



The Demi-Taaae 



Comedian. 



C Y^ef • S<nw 

"THE HARROW FELLER- 

HILL AND 

SYLVIANY 

Addrees REICH, PI.UNKETT A WESLEY. 

St. Jamee Building. 

MUSICAL SIMPSINS 

XL, and that meaae something. 

Hava Yaar Card ia VARIETY 






VARIETY 






NEW FIRM 



. 






NEW IDEAS 

JAMBS 






COOPER. KENDIS 



NEW SONGS 

HERMAN 

PALEY 



MUSIC PUBLISHING CO. 

110 WEST 40th STREET 












TO ARTISTSt 

We wish to announce to our many friends in the profession that we have opened offices at 1 10 West Fortieth Street, New York City, 
where we shall be pleased to again greet you with a view to cementing still firmer the mutually pleasant bonds of friendship that have main- 
tained in the past. We take advantage at this time to extend our hearty thanks to those members of the profession whose kindly patronage has 
largely contributed to our past success, feeling certain that without their kindly co-operation such success would not have been our reward. 

It has always been our endeavor to diverge from the beaten path and to furnish our friends with original ideas in words and music. 
We sincerely believe that our latest efforts which we now offer bear manifestation of our ambition in this direction. Quality, not quantity, 
is our motto. We first consider the singer, then write the song, which we believe is the best way to make the singer consider us. 

While it is a pleasure for us to know that our friends have "made good" with our creations in "the past, we look forward with confidence 
to a duplication of our initial efforts in the songs we now offer. 

TO MANAGERS: 

Who are in need of new ideas in staging and producing songs as well as new numbers for their exclusive use, we offer the services of 
our manager, Mr. Bert Cooper. Any recommendation of Mr. Cooper's work in this direction Would be fulsome, as we feel that the name 
alone stands for merit in this line. 












• 












Mr. HllQO Marks* late musical director of Proctor's Twenty- third Street Theatre, is connected with us and invites his many friends 
to call. 



After making the rounds of the different music publishers call on us and hear something different. 

We extend a hearty invitation .to our friends to come and listen to our new sonefs. 



- 



- 









• It 



• 



■ 






PER, 



KENDIS & PALEY 

r ■ 

HO WEST 40th STREET. NEW YORK CITY 



- 






. 






Now 



WILL ROSSITER'S 

PROFESSIONAL 

SONG HEADJUARTERS 

i. Grand Opera House Bldg. Chicago 

6ING "SUNNY SONGS" AND BE HAPPY 

••Farewell, my Annabelle" A alee girl could do wonders with me" 

•« The man with the jingle" "IF THfc MAN IN THE MOON WERE A COON" 

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WILL LESTER, who for three successive season* played "The Teacher" and Incidentally managed the 
AVON COM'BDY FOUR, In now at liberty and wants u partner, a good, straight man with the following 

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I HA YE THE ACT, A POSITIVE SUCCESS, AND ABSOLUTELY ORIGINAL. 
ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO 

WILL LESTER, Waterford, Mich. 



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VARIETY 



THE UNITED BOOKING AGENCY. 

Under the title of the United Booking 
Agency of America will be placed the 
recently formed combination between the 
Western Vaudeville Association and the 
B. F. Keith Booking Agency. 

The new name will replace both former 
titles, and the "Keith Booking Agency" 
as well as the "Western Vaudeville Asso- 
ciation" will be erased from the signs and 
from the memory if possible. 

The United Booking Agency of America 
will have fifty-seven good weeks at its 
command, and something like one hundred 
in all. The combination adds twenty first- 
class weeks from the West to the thirty- 
seven in the Keith office. 

The combination or merger is an ar- 
rangement for protection and is in form 
of a corporation. The managers retain 
the privilege of accepting or rejecting an 
act, and the present offices in New York 
and Chicago will be retained. 

The New York office will route acta 
to Cleveland and from there further West 
the routing will be completed by the 
Western office. 

Some of the Eastern and Western 
vaudeville theatres will be pooled after 
the manner of the Keith-Proctor houses 
in this city. Booking offices will be 
opened at London and Paris by October 
1. No one has been selected for the 
London agent, although it is probable 
that a choice will be made from the 
staff in the St. James building. In Paris 
it is likely that Martin Beck's traveling 
representative, W. Passpart, will be given 
charge. H. If. Feiber. the present foreign 
agent for the Keith office, will continue as 
general foreign representative, but will 
assume no executive position in either 
place. 



WANT AN AGREEMENT. 

On Thursday last Percy G. Williams 
was requested on behalf of the remaining 
managers in the Morris office, with the ex- 
ception of Hammerstein, the Western 
time and those houses under the direction 
of Mark Luescher, to sign an agreement 
guaranteeing the smaller managements 
safety in remaining under the Morris di- 
rection. 

These managers, composing the Wilmer 
& Vincent-Weber & Rush contingent, have 
fifteen vaudeville theatres. They did not 
join the Keith combination, staying with 
Morris owing to satisfactory terms not 
being offered by Keith to join him. 

They want to continue booking through 
the Morris office, but wish an agreement 
from Mr. Williams that he will not go 
into the Keith agency to book or sell his 
theatres without providing for them also. 
They look upon Williams as the present 
mainstay of the Morris office and claim 
that this protection will be demanded as 
the price of fidelity. 



WESTERN MANAGERS IN TOWN. 

Following Martin Beck and C. E. Bray 
there came to New York on Thursday 
Max C. Anderson, John J. Murdock and 
C. E. Kohl. 

Messrs. Murdock and Bray will remain 
in the city some time arranging for book- 
ings. Mr. Kohl is called here for family 
reasons, and Mr. Beck will return West in 
about a week, coming back to New York 
in August. At that time he will sail for 
Europe. 



BURLESQUE RUMORS. 

Rumors in the burlesque war have been 
plentiful this week. The Empire Circuit 
(Western Burlesque Wheel) held a meet- 
ing at Cincinnati on Thursday last at 
which all the managers attended. It was 
for the purpose of routing for next sea- 
son, but announcement of acquisitions 
from its rival was expected at the office 
of the Empire Circuit here as a result. 

Harry E. Jacobs of the Corinthian The- 
atre in Rochester was said to be one East- 
ern Wheel manager who would go over 
to the other side, and the Western Wheel 
folk it was said claimed would have the 
opposition in Boston and Providence. 

Much comment was caused through the 
fact of the Western Wheel having se- 
cured a site close to Hyde & Behman's 
Gaiety Theatre in Brooklyn. The opposi- 
tion anticipates from this move that it 
will bring Hyde & Behman inside its 
lines. If not immediately, at least not 
later than when excavations are com- 
menced. 

Gus Hill, in remarking on the many 
reports, said: "If anyone of those people 
hand you anything you can print it, and 
also sav that I will cover everv dollar 
that they can put up that the Western 
Wheel will not have another manager 
from our side. And I wouldn't mind 
making a bet that the Eastern Wheel 
has four Western Wheel houses before the 
season opens." 



EASTERN WHEEL IN DETROIT. 

One of the cities West in which an 
Eastern Burlesque Wheel vaudeville the- 
atre will be built is Detroit. This will 
bring the Eastern people into opposition 
with Drew & Campbell on the Western 
Wheel in two towns. In Cleveland, where 
Drew & Campbell manage the Colonial, 
it is opposed by the Eastern Wheel's Em- 
pire Theatre. 

An Eastern Wheel man said that the 
understanding between Drew & Campbell 
and the Western Burlesque Wheel was 
that the Empire should be eliminated 
from the burlesque world as opposition to 
them in Cleveland. This has not been 
done, and the invasion of Detroit is ex- 
pected by the Eastern crowd to bring 
Drew & Campbell into their camp before 
the season opens. 



ANOTHER CHICAGO HOUSE FOR 
EASTERN. 

Chicago, June 22. 

Three favorable theatre sites have been 
offered Jules Hurtig and Sam Scribner, 
who are in the city representing the Co- 
lumbia Amusement Company, a part of 
the Eastern Burlesque Wheel. 

The probable location for the new bur- 
lesque theatre here to be built for that 
Wheel will be on Clark street near 
Randolph. 



NOT ALL SIGNED. 

All is not serene in the Keith-Western 
Vaudeville Association "merger" camp, 
much as the St. James Building contin- 
gent would have folks believe it the case. 
Several of the managers alleged to have 
signed the agreement have not done so 
for one reason or another. For instance, 
M. C. Anderson hasn't affixed his signature 
to the document and frankly says that he 
doesn't intend to. He asserts his willing- 
ness to book through the association, but 
refuses to tie himself up for a stated pe- 
riod. 



LUESCHER AFTER SITES. 

Mark Luescher left on Wednesday for 
Pittsburg. While there he looked around 
for a site for a vaudeville theatre, as 
there is nothing now built in the Smoky 
City which may be had. 

From Pittsburg Mr. Luescher goea to 
Buffalo for the same purpose and expects 
before he returns to New York to have 
arranged for new vaudeville houses in 
both cities. 

Whatever ventures of a vaudeville na- 
ture Mr. Luescher becomes interested in 
will book through the William Morris 
office. 



SOME TRAVELLING COMPANIES. 

Plans are under way to organize six 
travelling vaudeville companies. Each 
will be headed by a big headliner and 
the tours will commence about Septem- 
ber 1. 

The companies will play mostly in the 
vaudeville houses, although time in com- 
bination houses will be taken. 



KEITH MAY GET SULLIVAN-CONSI- 

DINE. 

Chicago, June 22. 

An authentic report here says that the 
John Cort circuit in the Northwest will 
not play vaudeville next season. This 
move will take away the barrier to the 
Sullivan-Considine circuit going into the 
new combination between Keith and the 
Western Vaudeville Association. 

Up to the announcement that Cort has 
changed his mind, the Sullivan-Considine 
people refused to come in with Keith 
through the possible opposition of the Cort 
circuit which would have booked through 
the Western Vaudeville Association. 

The impression here is that the join- 
ing of the Sullivan-Considine circuit with 
the Keith -Western merger is positive. 
John W. Considine is expected to return 
Sunday. Next week will probably settle 
it. 



Up to Thursday no action had been 
taken by the Sullivan-Considine circuit 
as far as placing its bookings was con- 
cerned. 

John W. Considine earlier in the week 
said that nothing had been determined 
and he thought it equally possible that 
the houses would be booked direct as 
formerly. 



HAMMERSTEIN NOT LOCATED IN 
PHILADELPHIA. 

At the present time it seems that if 
Oscar Hammerstein gives vaudeville in 
Philadelphia he will have to build. It is 
admitted by Mr. Hammerstein that a 
house there cannot be had and that the 
Chestnut Street Theatre would not be 
suitable for his purpose. Mark Luescher 
has stated that he would lend the theatre 
after it came into his possession to Ham- 
merstein, but, the offer will probably not 
be taken advantage of. 

Up to the present moment Mr. Ham- 
merstein has not procured a «ite in Phila- 
delphia upon which to build. He says 
that a house can be erected within five 
months after the site is selected. 



ATTEMPTING TO BREAK THE 
MERGER. 

Court proceedings that may develop 
into a case vitally touching the present 
vaudeville situation will be begun next 
week when there will come up for argu- 
ment before Supreme Court Justice Gie- 
gerich the application of Frank Melville, 
the summer park agent, to restrain "The 
Red Raven Cadets" from playing any 
houses controlled by the newly formed 
United Booking Agency. In the applica- 
tion Mr. Melville alleges that the manager 
of the Cadets and the vaudeville com- 
bine are in a conspiracy against him, and 
should the injunction asked for be grant- 
ed this allegation will be made the basis 
of an application for a Supreme Court 
order to show cause why the merger 
should not be dissolved on the ground 
that that institution is in restraint of 
trade. 

The present action is based on this set 
of facts as alleged by Mr. Melville: The 
vaudeville act known as "The Red Raven 
Cadets" was engaged to appear next week 
at the Valley Theatre, Syracuse, booked 
by Mr. Melville. Contracts were signed 
for the troupe by its manager, J. A. Mo- 
rass. Some days later Moross notified 
Mr. Melville that the act would not play 
his up-State house, giving as the reason 
that the Keith people would cancel his 
time if it did so. 

The application names as defendants 
J. A. Moross, Jules Delmar, B. F.. Keith, 
F. F. Proctor, Charles E. Kohl, George 
Castle, Maurice Meyerfeld, Edward F. Al- 
bee, Martin Beck, George Middleton, Frank 
Tate, The Keith and Proctor Amusement 
Co., S. Z. Poli, James H. Moore, Michael 
Shea, the United Booking Agency and 
others. 

In the papers to be filed in the injunc- 
tion proceedings no mention is made of 
a certain letter alleged to have been writ- 
ten by Mr. Delmar to the manager of the 
act, in which the agent is reported to have 
threatened that if the act played the Val- 
ley Theatre the Keith time which had 
been given them would be withdrawn. 
This letter, it is said, was given to Mr. 
Melville by Moross when he notified him 
that the Cadets would not play Syracuse. 
An effort will be made to place this letter 
in evidence before the court. 

"I am in opposition with the Keith 
Booking Agency in eight cities," said Mr. 
Melville yesterday, "and it is my con- 
viction that there is a very determined 
effort on foot to drive me out of business. 
I am prepared to fight not only on the 
merits of my case, but as a matter of 
principle and because I realize that it is 
with me, as with all the agents, a matter 
of business life or death." 

The towns in which the opposition oc- 
curs through summer parks are Paterson, 
Albany, Rochester, Syracuse, Buffalo, 
Toronto, Pittsburg and Altoona. 

Jules Delmar was asked for a state- 
ment of his connection with the matter 
during the week and he declared that he 
had heard nothing about it and could not 
discuss the affair. 



Vesta Victoria arrived in England suf- 
fering from a very severe cold. She was 
compelled to lay off owing to her indispo- 
sition, creating a vacancy in the bills of 
three music halls. 



"CHINK" COMING BACK. 

Paul Cinquevalli, the juggler, will re- 
turn to New York about October 1, open- 
ing over the Williams circuit. He ha,s 
been booked by Marinelli. 



Gardner and Maddern have been offered 
European time. 



VARIETY 



VARIETY 

A Variety Paper for Variety People. 

Published every Saturday by 
TIB VARIETY PUBLISHING CO. 

Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 

1402 Broadway, New York City. 

Telephone 1837— 38th St. 

8XME J. SILVERMAN, 
Editor and Proprietor. 



Entered as second-class matter December 
22, 1006, at the poet office at New York, N. Y., 
under the act of Congress of March 3, 1870. 

CHICAGO OFFICE, 

79 8. CUrk St. 

FRANK WIESBERO, Representative. 

LONDON OFFICE, 

48 Oranbourne St. 

MISS JENIE JACOBS, Representative. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 

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page, $100; one-half page, $50; one-quarter page, 
$25. 

Charge for portraits furnished on application. 

Special rate by the month for professional card 
under beading, "Representative Artists." 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Annual $2 

Foreign 8 

Six and three montha lu proportion. 
Single copies five centa. 

Variety will be mailed to a permanent address 
or as per route as desired. 

VARIETY may be bad abroad at 
INTERNATIONAL NDWS CO.S OFFICES. 

Make all remittances payable to Variety Publish- 
ing Co. 

Copyright, 1006, by Variety Publishing Co. 



Vol III. 



~ f - 



No. 2. 



VARIETY announces "fairness' 1 as the 
policy governing it. 

It is conducted on original lines for a 
theatrical newspaper. Whatever there is 
to be printed of interest to the profes- 
sional world will be printed without re- 
gard to whose name is mentioned or the 
advertising columns. 

"All the news all the time" and "ab- 
solutely fair" are the watchwords. 

The reviews are written in a strictly 
impartial manner and for the benefit of 
the artists. 

VARIETY is an artist's paper, for the 
artists and to which any artist may come 
with a just grievance. 

VARIETY will not burden its columns 
with "wash" notices; it will not be in- 
fluenced by advertising; it will be honest 
from the first page to the last. 



The weekly meetings of the White Rats 
arc now held on Thursday. 



Hubert Grau Bays he will return once 

sj 

more to the agency business. 



Leo Tung Foo, the Chinese baritone, has 
been hooked abroad by Pit rot & Girard. 

Sydney DcGrcy has left "The Three 
Graces" in Chicago and will essay vaude- 
ville. 



llenshaw and Fransiolli, a "sister act/' 
did mil play Pastor's this week although 
billed. 



The "Dainty Paree" burlesque company 
will have Harry Pierce as its manager 
next season. 

The mechanical revolving stage of the 
London Coliseum is ■ world-beater and 
cost $175,000. 



In Vienna an actress is being tried for 
perjury for saying she was 27 when she 
was really 20. 



Frank Keeney has booked Mabel Mc- 
Kinley for his opening week in Brooklyn 
— September 12. 






Kzra Kendall has recovered from an ill- 
ness confining him to his home in Cleve- 
land for the past six weeks. 



Hurt E. Melburn, now appearing with 
Bryant's Minstrels, will go with the 
Primrose Minstrels next season. 



Violet Staley has been engaged by Gus 
Hill for his new pantomimic comedy pro- 
duction entitled "Around the Clock." 



The last count of London music halls 
showed 47, but the number will soon reach 
50. Theatres will list about the same. 



A one-act musical extravaganza by 
Henrietta Markstein, the pianiste, is to 
be seen in vaudeville the coming season. 



While attempting to close a window 
last week Lulu Thies fell off the chair 
she was standing on, breaking several ribs. 



Harvey Green and Harry Woods are to 
come together in a Hebrew dialect team 
act with the latter in the comedy role. 



For the time being, in view of extreme 
competition^ the London County Council 
is wisely ignoring the standing room ques- 
tion. 



There will be fifty-seven people on the 
bill at Henderson's, Ooney Island, nexr 
week. Nine acts will compose the pro- 
gram. 



Americans will not have the pleasure of 
seeing Harry Lauder, that is, not for some 
time to come, as he is booked solid until 
1012. 



Mr. Kean. for the past three years lead- 
ing man with Valerie Bergere. will make 
a tour in vaudeville on his own hook next 
season. 



Henrv Pincus wired Variety from At- 
lantie Citv as follows: " 'Mamzelle Cham- 
pagne' a tremendous success.'' It is Mr. 
Pincus' show. 



The only artist in all the world who 
appeared before royalty ami never wrote 
the papers aibout it is little O. K. Sato of 
Irvingtottj N. J. 



Billy Jerome has returned from Tryon, 
S. C. and will summer in the immediate 
vicinity of New York, running into town 
at regular intervals. 



Richard Pit rot. the agent, has been of- 
fered the part of a waiter in a forthcom- 
ing large Broadway production. Mr. Pi- 
trot declined the offer. 



Trene Mackey, sister of Julie Mackey 
and wife of Jules Ruby, sailed for Eng- 
land last Saturday to join her sister, who 
i«; said to be seriously ill. 

Jack Sutton, the manager of the Tas- 
inanian women acrobats, is tin* original 
"Happy .lack" Sutton, who was Hainum's 
noted cowboy 'way back in 'S3. 



London trial .shows are bad. A number 
of halts try about twenty turns every Mon- 
day, and couldn't possibly book all these 
acts if they were all novelties. 



Work commenced this week on the 
Plock building in Altoona, Pa., which is 
being remodelled for use as a Keith vaude- 
ville theatre next season. 



Meyer Cohen, manager for Charles K. 
Harris, has been granted a permit to sing 
in all city parks as soloist with the bands 
during the weekly concerts. 



Geo. P. Murphy, Jr., will spend the 
summer at Fair Haven, N. J., until open- 
ing with the "Tiger Lillies" company, for 
which he has been re-engaged. 



George W. Kngleberth, who has been 
amusement director for Coney Island, 
Cincinnati, will next season be with Hav- 
erley's Minstrels as advance man. 



Violet Bolls has sailed for Europe, 
to be gone for a couple of years. She in- 
tends to make her home in Paris and study 
real hard for a career in grand opera. 



Although not imported to this country 
for Keith's time, Selma Rrantz, the 
youthful young woman juggler, haft been 
booked by the Keith Agency up to Octo- 
ber next. 



Harry Taft, an American artist, who 
has been abroad for some time, is back 
in town looking over acts for foreign con- 
sumption. Mr. Taft will shortly return 
to England. 

When John C. Fisher's 4, Florodora" com- 
pany arrived in Baltimore the other day 
its members were notified that the salaries 
would be cut in two for the remainder of 
the summer. 



The receipts for the Trocadero Theatre 
in Chicago last week were $5,300, a record 
for the house. Stock is being given there 
under the management of Eastern Wheel 
burlesque managers. 

Morris and Morris, an English team do- 
ing a comedy acrobatic act, came over 
recently on the chance of getting time. 
They have been l>ooked to open at Proc- 
tor's Twenty-third July 2. 



At Grantham, England, lives Henry 
Johnson, the oldest acrobat in the world, 
who will reach the age of 100 the latter 
part of this year. He has appeared be 
fore William IV, the late Queen Victoria. 
and Kincr Edward V1T. when Prince of 
Wales. The King has lately sent him a 
letter of congratulation and irood wishes. 
No doubt America still has W r alter Went- 
worth, the world's oldest contortionist, 
who must be in the nineties by this time. 
He performed in England only a few 
years ago. 



Duncan S. Miller, founder of the 
IVoyal ITandbell Ringers, is dead. He was 
noted for charity, and mativ befriended 
cripples attended his funeral. 'Hie Ring- 
ers showed oft on to royalty, and in 34 
years gave 0,040 entertainments. 



The London County Council is still af- 
ter the Canterbury, a carefully managed 
house that has never had an accident. To 
meet their requirements heretofore the 
Canterbury and Paragon have spent 
ffiOJKMfc 



The Rell-Prevost troujie of four acro- 
bats will be seen in a short time. The 
Prevost of the firm is the original Prevost 
of Prevost and Prevost, while the other 
half of the hyphenated name is Tommy 
Bell of the Bell Family. 



Some time ago it was printed that Ed- 
gar Allen, now with Myers & Keller, had 
married. The report injured Mr. Allen 
among his fair acquaintances, who object 
to linger in the society of a married man, 
and he wishes it denied. 



Margaret Webb, late of Holcomb, Cur- 
tis and Webb, has formed a combination 
with J. Waldo Connelly, for four years 
pianist at Keith's, and will ojkmi in a new 
sketch on June 25 at Gloversville. The 
piece is entitled "Love and Absinthe." 



Bunco about artists who appeared be- 
fore the Crown Prince of Germany some 
weeks ago is still drifting into the papers, 
and it's a mighty good thing they did 
appear before him. as otherwise their con- 
tracts would have l>een broken. 



An American team now playing returns 
on one of the principal English tours was 
offered future time in consideration of a 
cut salary. The spokesman of the team 
pulled a tiny farthing out of his pocket 
and sad he wouldn't cut the saalry that 
much. 

Low Fields had some negotiations with 
Cissy Ix>ftus for his Herald Square The- 
atre company, but hesitated too long. 
While he was dickering for her services 
Al. Holbrook. representing Joe Weber, 
walked in. asked her to set a price and 
closed with her instantlv. 

A criticism of some of the London halls 
is that the show runs in too thin a vol- 
ume, too many single funis, and not of 
the kind that run as strong as doubles. 
Have more acts but a less number of art- 
ists than in America. The propram ar- 
rangement is poor, three or four singing 
turns following in succession. 



It is claimed for Eleanor Henry, a 
young girl prominently connected socially 
in the ultra part of Brooklyn and who is 
now in vaudeville, that she* is prettier in 
the peculiar mold of Edna May than Miss 
May herself. Miss Henry is quite ath- 
letic, without being S graduate of a 
physical culture school, although she does 
not use her muscular accomplishments for 
the entertainment of audiences. 



Last Siit unlay night in front of the 
New York Theatre the ticket speculators 

assemlded there had a fistic encounter 

over ri^ht <»f position. The tight waxed 

warm and though three police officers 

stood around no attempt to arrest the 

display of fisticuffs or the participants 

was made by the guardians of the peace. 

It is believed that word came from the 

box office to let I hem tight it out, as it 

would lessen the bookkeeping if there 

were one le*s (<• Stand in" with through 

disablement. 



VARIETY 



Why the Vaudeville Artists 

of America Should Organize 



BY SIME. 



With the election of the White Kats 
over and the Comedy Club well on it* way 
to a permanent organization the time 
.should not be far distant when the vaude- 
ville artists of America are gathered to- 
gether under one banner. 

Affiliation between these two societies 
should be readily accomplished at the 
proper moment, either through the indi 
vidual members joining the organization 
numerically stronger, or an open com- 
bination. 

Many of the foremost members of the 
White Knts have joined the other organiza- 
tion and by reason of this a friendly feel- 
ing exists. 

If the policy of the Rats is changed to 
an aggressive, persistent campaign for the 
purpose of enlarging the membership 
much good will result, but if the former 
method of indifference prevails the mem- 
bership will not increase rapidly enough to 
cause comment. 

Particular attention should be given to 
bringing the artists in the West into an 
organization. Many out there have never 
played New York, ami any nunuVr play 
only the smaller houses outside Chicago, 
but as a class tliey are exceptionally in- 
telligent. Variety has received a quan- 
tity of letters from Western artists and 
has published some. 

These letters have evidenced a high grade 
of knowledge, with the writers in posses- 
sion of the facts regarding the vaudeville 
conditions. 

Where there is intelligence there will be 
progress and the Western artists will come 
to the front. They are necessary to a com- 
plete organization ; irstly because all 
vaudeville artists should ik» leagued to- 
gether and secondly through the danger 
of not having them. 

. If the artists should feel at any time in 
the future that it would lie beneficial to 
make a demonstration of strength, 't 
might not avail without the assistance of 
these smaller acts. 

With the Weptefn Vaudeville Associa- 
tion, which is now openly combined with 
the Keith Agency, and the William Morris 
branch office in Chicago, a statistical sys- 
tem will bring to the agencies a list of 
acts from which material may be secured 
to replace any opening in a bill. 

A $400 act may not play the time is 
expected, but its absence will not close the 
theatre. The whole bill may refuse to 
play, but a show can be given with non- 
members of this description. 

The managers may not be able to offer 
a bill of the same merit, but they can g ; w 
a -show. If his house is open some business, 
will lie done. If an artist does not work 
he will not receive one cent from the man- 
ager. 

With all artists together one manager 



may put a bill together under amy circum- 
stances; perhaps two, three, live or ten, 
but one hundred and fifty hills could not 
be given in one week. The vaudeville con- 
ditions managerially are so closely allied 
that to touch one financially is to touch 
others. 

The salvation of the vaudeville artists 
of this country is to get together. Not 
here or there hut all. There is no repu- 
table artist that an organisation can 
a fiord to reject. 

Whether it be the Keith Agency or the 
William Morris coterie of managers in 
control of the vaudeville situation, the ar- 
tist must organize. Vaudeville is heading 
directly for an absolute dictator. It i> 
coining, and it can't l>e stopped. . If not 
in this generation, it will be in the next. 

It will l>e a different sort of merger, 
however, with the artists organised solidly. 
Some society must commence this. There 
isn't so much time left. When a com- 
bination of managers is strong enough to 
exert the barring clause it must api>eal to 
a sensible person that the minute for or- 
ganization can not be delayed. 

An argument will he raised that an 
agency which can give from fifty to 
seventy-five to one hundred weeks has no 
need for a barring clause or necessitv for 
its use. If this theory should prevail the 
uacle ssn es i of organisation becomes im- 
mediately apparent. 

The Keith people claim that they have 
not cut salaries nor do they intend to, 
and that Varietv has falsified itself bv 
making, any such statement. 

Variety says once more what it bus 
paid before, that the Keith Booking 
Agency will cut salaries, perhaps not so 
openly now that opposition exists, but the 
cut will come. A little each year. Thai 
"little" may not seem much until time 
h&| caused the percentage yearly to be 

considerable gross. With Keith in con- 
trol the artist will never return to the 
present money plane. 

There has 1mh»h some talk About an 
organization of all acts outside the classi- 
fication of "comedy." That will be a wis<< 
move if it can be successfully managed, 
provided the ultimate object is consolida- 
tion with other societies for protective 
purposes. 

Any proposition looking toward promo- 
tion of organization is good. Organization 
\< Imperative; it is needful, but it will 
never be wholly successful without all the 
artists. 

With this issue Variety will discontinue 
the series of articles under this heading. 
The artists have started on the proper 
road. Variety offers its assistance always 
and will report through its news columns 
the progress of their efforts. 



FOUR S'S. 

Pam Shannon and Sam Sidman will l>e 
a team from now on and are having a 
K|»ceial setting made for a new Herman 
coined v act in one. Thev open dulv 2 
at Newark, Ohio, playing park dates for 
six weeks thereafter. 



TWO MORE GO. 

Violet IIolls, late of "The Karl and the 
Cirl," sailed last week for London, where 
•die is scheduled for a vaudeville tour. Miss 
Molls was In T/ondon four years ago. This 
i:« her first trip across since then. On the 
name steamer was Zclma Ra wis ton. 



• 



• 



WHITE RATS ELECT OFFICERS. 

At the election held by the White Rats 
of America last Sunday the following of- 
ficer* wen- duly declared elected and in- 
stalled for ■ term of two years: 

President It. ('. Mudge. 

Vice-President Ceo. W. Munroe. 

Secretary l. K. Burlc 

Treasurer Marry <>. Hayes. 

Trustees- Ceo. K. Delmore, (alio U*, 
reiki and John Let lair. 

Chaplain (has. T. Aldrich. 

Note Rat Ken Shield*. 

Rap Rat— C. Lorella. 

(iua id Rat- M. J. Sullivan. 

Prop Rat— Frank Cardincr. 

Xectar Rat — .lunie McCree. 

Jest Rat— Hobby (lavlor. 

Robert C. Mudge, the newly elected 
president of the order, has been a member 
since February, 1901. The society was 
organised on June 17, 1IHM>. and chartered 
in duly, 1901. At the first meeting held 
on the date of organization there were as- 
sembled (Jeo. Fuller (Jolden, Dave Mont 
gomery, Sam Morton, Tom tawls, Sam 
Ryan, Nat Haines, Mark Murphy, Al Stin- 
son, Clias. Mason, James .1. Morton and 
Joseph I'ettingill. Among these were "'the 
original eight" who had previously met in- 
formally and were responsible for the 
birth of the society. 

Mr. sludge appeared professionally in 
the West during 'TO-'SO, but other than 
this has not been active in connection with 
the variety stage excepting for the man- 
agement of his daughter's (Kva Mudge) 
tour*. He has been interested in commer- 
cial pursuits and combines a thorough 
knowledge of the status of the artist with 
business principles. 

Judson (J. Wells was again selected a* 
attorney for the order. 

*j 

OFFICIAL INTERFERENCE. 

'The Globe of Death'" which WM« Ui 
have played Keith's I'liion Square Theatre 
this week did not appear through the Bu- 
reau of Combustible* serving notice that 
the act could not play owing to the gaso- 
lene carried. 

Although the Keith office was fully 
aware of the state of affair* at two o'clock 
on Monday afternoon, the management of 
the act was not informed of the full de- 
tails until five minutes before their time 
to appear in the evening. A short bicycle 
riding net only had been given in the af- 
ternoon. LcCaron and Herbert were sub- 
stituted for the week. 

JO PAIGE SMITH ASKS PERMISSION. 

An application has been made to the 
Supreme Court of New York County by 
do Paige Smith, the vaudeville agent, 
requesting permission to* marry in this 
State. The decree of divorce which end- 
ed Mr. Smith's last Wedded life forbade 
him again getting spliced. 

While it would not have Imm-ii against 
the law for Mr. Smith to join 
wedded hands in another State, it 
would appear from the application 
that do Paige want* to be married 
in his home city. The papers in the case 
neglected to mention the name of the 
future Mrs. Smith. Many guesses are 
made but none guaranteed. 



GOLDEN'S BENEFIT BIG SUCCESS. 

The testimonial to George Fuller Golden 
at the New York Theatre last Sunday 
night was a marked success, artistically 

.ind financially. i 

The large house was 'jammed full of 
humanity and the receipts are estimated 
at shout f>MNN& Mr. Golden in his speech 
of thanks said that he trusted to* amount 
realised Would go far toward restoring his 
health. 

The White Kats of America, through 
John P. ltd!; presented a Moral 'insignia 
of the order on the stage, together with 
*«">00 for an autographed program on which 

each person taking part in the perform- 
ance attached his or her signature. 

Fourteen number* were given, eleven ap- 
pearing between 11:98 and 10 o'clock, hi 
the order of their appearance they were: 
(lenaro and Bailey, James J, Morton "as- 
sisted" by Charles Grape win, Kddie U'on- 
ard, Trul v Shattuek, Henry K. Dixcy, Lew- 
is and Ryan. Andrew Mack, Six Proven- 
llies, Blanche King, ROSS and Kenton. 
George M. Cohan. Clarice Nance, Peter V. 
Dailey, DeWolf Hopper and the Empire 
city Qusrtet; 

Maurice Levi conducted the doe Weber 
orchestra for the occasion, and William 
Morris was stage manager, Lee Harrison 
act in" as announcer. 

Before the curtain ruse The Great La- 
fayette impersonated Mr. Levi, deceiving 
the entire audience, mostly composed of 
professionals. 






WINSOR McCAY FRAMING NEW ACT. 

The humorous illustrator, Witisor Me 
Cay, has in mind an elaborate vaudeville 
act embodying the chsrsctera of his "Rare- 
bit Fiend" series, it will lie given in pan- 
tomime and is expected to be ready by 
next season's opening. 

Mr. Met av may delay his own appear 

• • • ■ ■ 

anee regularly in vaudeville until his ar- 
rangement ftir future production by the 
Herald will allow the artist to travel out 
of town. At present his weekly contribu- 
tions to hi> paper prevents this. 

DE LORIS HAS A PLAN. 

An international touring vaudeville 
company is the present intention of Chev- 
alier Del.oiis. the sharpshooter. The Chev- 
alier has no love for managers, and in 
proof of his assertion that they arc not 
necessary to a profitable existence he says 
he will organize a company composed of 
himself and five ''sister acts," touring the 
world. The first stop will be Japan. 

Whether DeLoris considers himself or 
the "sister acts" the attraction he de- 
clines to aver, but seems positive that the 
uiils are necessary t<» the complete success 
of the trip. 



"Touchstone," the dramatic reviewer <d' 
the South African News. i-. developing as 
a vaudeville critic of discernment and 
judgment. 



FAST BOOKING. 

The Sixteen Barbers, a foreign acro- 
batic act, have been booked for over here 
through the II. It. Marinclli Agency and 
will open ai Niagara Kails duly 2. 

The New York office of the agency re- 
ceived a request for a foreign feature 
from the Kails people on last Tuesday. 
The cable was set in motion ami on Wed- 
nensday morning the confirmation for ten 
weeks was received. The Barbers are 
tumblers on the Arab style. 

The Si\ Cullvs have tilled I heir pi in- 
to $7oO for next, season. They have re 
fused all offers at the old rate. 



i 



VARIETY 



/ 



LEO CARRILLO'S CARTOON OF THE WEEK. 




• 


















K.-P. FIRM HAS FIFTH AVENUE. 

The Fifth Avenue Theatre has been 
leaned to the Keith-Proctor corporation 

for a period of ten years from May 1, 
1007, at an advance of $10,000 over the 
present rental. 

'Hie lease includes the store on the cor- 
ner of Twenty -eighth street and Broadway 
now occupied l>y a railroad ticket office. 

This will be torn out and an entrance 
made into the theatre, the present lobby 
nnd entrance on Broadway being discon- 
tinued at the expiration of the lease now 
in effert. That space will be made 
into a rentable condition. It is expected 
that it will return the increase in price. 

The International Kealtv Company 
through .). Austin Fynes. its prime mover, 
i> the landlord of the theatre huihliii" and 
executed the lease. 

EXPECT TO BOOK MONDAY. 

It is on the schedule of the Keith Book* 
ins Agency that the bookings and rout- 
ing of acts for next season over the com- 
bined circuits will commence next .Mini- 
day, June 2o. 

This action may 1m> dependent, though, 
upon the deci s i on of the Canadian circuit 
relative to two more houses in town* 
across the border which arc now being 
nought. 



NO "MRS." JAMES A. BYRNE. 

The kklnappirg ease in Philadelphia 
occupying considerable npace in the daily 

press in the early part of the week 
brought into the newspaper accounts of 
the affair the name of "Mrs." James A. 
Byrne. 

This woman, who wa> alleged to be 
the aid to the chief conspirator, was an- 
nounced as the wife of James A. Byrne, 
of the original Byrne Brothers, who are 
always associated with "Might Bells.'' 

While .lames A. Byrne is one of the 
origins la he has never married, and the 
woman who is mixed up with the kid- 
nappers nither assumed the name, or, if 
she had a right to it. is the wife of some 
other man. 

NOTHING IN IT. 

The daily papers on Thursday an- 
nounced a transfer of the properties 26*3 
to -j.v.i Wont 125th street and running 
through to 120th >t reel to Felix Isnian 
ami Harry Levey, the baekcrs of Mark 
l.ueschcr in hi> Chestnut Street Theatre 
enterprise. This gave rise to the rumor 
that they contemplated the erection of 
another playhouse in Harlem. At the 
present time it is the intention of the 

new owner* to convert the property into 
* . ii. 

an olliic Imildinir. 



EASTERN WHEEL HOUSES BY 
WHOLESALE. 

following the return of L. Lawrence 
Weber and (Jus Hill from a Western trip 
made in the interests of (lie Columbian 

Amusement Company and the Eastern 
Burlesque Wheel comes a statement that 

sites for nine new burlesque houses in va- 
rious cities between here and Chicago have 
lieen located, and the theatres will be built 
and finished by January 1 next. 

It is further stated that the contract 
for the latest house to he completed calls 
for December 1. No names of the towns 
have been given out* That will come later. 

This gi\es the Kasteru people thirty-six 
theatres, its full complement, a like unm- 
ix v of travelling shows having Immmi pm- 
\ ided for. 



COMING BACK AT LAST. 

lom Brant ford, the American comedian, 
is coming hack home some time in An 
jrust. Mr. Bra nt ford has liecn abroad these 
many long years, his last appearance in 
this country having iieen some time about 
I son. During his stay on the other side 
the American has built up a considerable 
reputation, Bcich, Plunked \ Wesley 
will direct his tour in vaudeville while 
here. 



A RUSH ABROAD. 

Here are some of the Marinclli Transat- 
lantic bookings for the near future: Jack 
son Caiuily of bicyclists, opening for a 
lour at Baris July 10; Millman Trio, 
Spissel Brothers and Mack and Tom 
I lea in at the (My in pin, Paris, August 17. 
Le Domino Kouge returns to London Au- 
Kiist 'JO to ojm'ii at the Palace. The Kita- 
fuku Troupe of Japanese are scheduled 
for eight months on the other side, in- 
cluding a .slay at the London Hippo- 
drome beginning September 24. Mignani 
opens in September at Amsterdam. The 
Mouatts in December will be seen at the 
Kolies llergerea, Paris, with a Continental 
tour to follow, and Campbell and Johnson, 
the bicycle pair, go to the Wintcrgarten, 
Berlin August is. 



TROUBLE OVER LOCATION. 

Cincinnati, June 22. 

An injunction suit has been brought to 
restrain the Fall Festival Association from 
using Washington Park for its fete. 

By some it is said that the persons 
who were opposed have changed their 
views, but in iin\ event it is declared to 
lie improbable that the hearing can he 
reached upon the court calendar until 
after the festival. 












VARIETY 



ORCHESTRAS ORDERED OUT. 
The Music*] Union has "ordered out" 
all orchestral playing in local vaudeville 
houses managed by the Keith Proctor 

Arm, 

This action is the result of the trouble 
arising over the cut rate j>aid by Proctor 
to union musicians as previously recounted 
in Variety. 

The action of the union at that time af- 
fected the Proctor city houses only, but 
since the consolidation Keith's Union 
(Square in now partly under the Proctor 
banner and that also conies under the ban. 

The Keith office is very much wroth 
over having Proctor's troubles thrust upon 
it. 

The order goes into effect after the cus- 
tomary two weeks notice, already given, 
expires. 



WINONA WINTER'S FUTURE 
SETTLED. 

Through a contract signed with Alf 
llaymaii. the theatrical manager, Winona 
Winter, the vaudeville artiste, will be un- 
der Mr. Hayman's management for the 
next five years. 

Miss Winter is the daughter of Banks 
Winter and seventeen years old. She will 
be started at the head of her own com- 
pany commencing next season. A play 
will be written around her talents, which 
are well set off by a pretty face and pleas- 
ing stage presence. 



LEW FIELDS RETURNS EMPTY- 
HANDED. 

The hasty trip abroad of Lew Fields to 
secure a play for his Herald Square The- 
atre next season resulted in a blank for 
the manager. Neither did Mr. Fields se- 
cure a contract for Vesta Victoria's ap- 
pearance at his playhouse. 

A piece by an American author will 
now be ordered. It will be of the "skit" 
variety, following those given at the Web- 
er house during and after Mr. Fields' con- 
Meet ion with it. 



HILL SAYS HE HAS RITCHIE. 

llillie Ritchie, the "drunk" of Fred Kar- 
no's "Night in an English Music Hall," 
may be the storm centre of a managerial 
legal row. AJf Reeves, the manager of 
the company now touring in the West 
with Mr. Karno's production, stated that, 
notwithstanding a report to the contrary, 
Mr. Ritchie would remain with him. 

(Jus Hill lietieves Ritchie will play with 
him next season as the star of "Around 
the Clock" and says that Mr. Reeves is 
mistaken; that he holds Ritchie under 
contract and shall insist that he goes out 
with the show in Septeml>er. It, is a nice 
exhibition of a difference of opinion. 

KEITH AFTER PARKS. 

Lima, O., .Tune 22. 
An offer has l>ecn made by It. F. Keith 
to the Western Ohio Railway for a lease 

on McJfcth Lake Park nnd theatre. 

The offer will probably be accepted. 
It is understood here that Keith is form- 
ing n circuit of parks throughout Ohio. 



Josephine Gftssmen k<>.,s to Australia 
at Christmas time for a six months tour, 
which may be Indefinitely extended. Her 

last visit there consumed two years and 
nine months. 



THE COMEDY CLUB. 

The committee appointed by the Comedy 

Club to procure permanent meeting rooms 

has not reported its decision, but may do 
so at the' next meeting on Sunday, June 
24. A constitution said to l>c very broad 
has been adopted. 

The club has decided upon a policy of 
secrecy, but it is known that the mem- 
bership has rapidly increased, with prop 
ositions in plenty waiting to be acted 
upon. 

A prominent artist in discussing the 
withholding of what would be interesting 
Information snenl the progress of the 
club said: 'I think it is a mistake to 
maintain secrecy in an organisation of this 
nature, and especially during its inception. 
It will tend to create the impression that 
the affair has been a failure. No one 
hearing of it in print will gradually have 
the club erased from his memory. The 
interest of the members and the profes- 
sion could be kept aroused by constantly 
reading about the club. When it is firmly 
established it will advertise itself; until 
then no opportunity for publicity should 
he lost." 

A matter discussed at the club's last 
meeting was the habit of managers of call- 
ing npon artists to journey from out-of- 
town houses to play Sunday engagements 
in theatres of the same management. The 
club determined that it should announce 
that its members would refuse to follow 
this practice in the future. 

The chief offender in this resj>ect has 
been the Proctor circuit, acts playing 
Albany being called u]K>n for special Sun- 
day appearances in New York constantly. 



EASTERN GETS BON TON IN PHILA- 
DELPHIA. 

The Eastern Wheel will play their 
shows in the Ron Ton Theatre in Phila- 
delphia next season. The house belongs 
to Jermon and will be entirely refitted 
and improved. 



A POLITICAL REWARD. 

Maude T. Cordon, who has been leading 
woman with Valerie Bergere, will he at 
the head of a new act presently. The 
forthcoming sketch was written by Ruth 
Bryan, a daughter of the Nebraskan with 
a political past. 



OUT OF VAUDEVILLE. 

There will 1m* little vaudeville given by 
llurtig A Seauion during next season. 
With the Music Hall on I'Joth street in 
possession of the Kastcrn Burlesque Wheel 
as one of its new New York houses there 
will be left for the firm the Sunday vaudi'- 
villi' concerts only. The Yorkville Theatre's 
policy will Is' stock, while the Metropolis 
will play combinations a.s formerly, ltolh 
these houses are now under the' llurtig & 
Seamon management. 



"BUSTER BROWN" CUTTING UP 
SOME. 

M. It. Raymond will send out his '"Bus- 
ter Brown" companies next season in the 
face of the manifesto of John Lelller, who 
represents It. V. Outcalt and declares the 
contract with Raymond annulled. Dur- 
ing last season Raymond discovered that 
the dramatic rights to "Ruster" were vest- 
ed with the New York Herald and ceased 
paving anv further royalties to Lettler & 
outcalt. He claims that no suit was 
brought to recover, but that he has insti- 
tuted an action for the return of some 
$0.'MH>0 in royalties he has already paid 
over to l-cftler & Outcalt through a mis- 
apprehension that they were the owners 
of the dramatic rights; Raymond now 
claims that he has James Gordon Bennett's 
authorization, by cable, to go ahead with 
his production. 



WEBER'S MUSICAL COMPLICATIONS. 

Victor Herbert will write the first half 
of the new Joe Weber production for the 
coming season. This much is settled, but 
who will complete the second part or 
burlesque portion of the show is still an 
open question* Maurice Levi has a con- 
tract for one year more to direct the 
music hall performances and write the 
musical portion of the entertainment. Mr. 
Levi says he will do it all or none and 
by engaging Herbert, Weber will place 
himself in the position of having to pay 
two salaries. Levi, however, is not out in 
the cold. He goes to England in December 
to write for a prominent l/uidon manager, 
having received a proposition bigger than 
anything he has yet been connected with. 
Another complication that has arisen is 
the publication rights to the doe Weber 
productions. Charles K. Harris holds a 
three years contract with one more season 
to run. If, Wit mark & Sons claim an ex- 
clusive contract with Victor Herbert. This 
Herbert denies. 



STEGER DISAPPOINTED. 

Disappointment ami a little rage is ram- 
pant in the breast of Julius Steger, who 
•mule a successful New York vaudeville 
debut at Proctor's Twentv-third Street 
Theatre this week. 

When Mr. Steger first had the notion of 
entering vaudeville he agreed with Mr. 
Proctor that he would play the Newark 
house at a reduced figure, to be slightly 
increased at Twenty-third Street and his 
price which was set to be thereafter paid 
was to l>e further advanced if his act 
proved a success. 

No written agreement was made, Mr. 
Steger relying upon a verbal understand- 
ing. The artist carried out his portion 
of the contract, but early in the week was 
told that if he desired to play longer on 
the Keith -Proctor time it would have to 
be at the reduced figure paid at the Twen- 
ty-third Street. 

Whether Mr. Steger accepts or not re- 
mains to be seen. His expensive company 
will probably prove a bar, even though he 
were inclined to do so. 



WANTED HEADLINE POSITION 
AMONG STARS. 

Of the programmed volunteers for the 
George Fuller Golden benefit last Sunday 
three disappointed, two unavoidably and 
one intentionally. 

L* Belle Daisy (The Red Domino) in- 
jured her foot and was forbidden by her 
physician from dancing, although she 
greatly desired to appear. Lillian Rus- 
sell sent a note fully explaining her in- 
ability to Ih» present, but- Joe Welch, the 
Hebrew comedian, declined to answer to 
his name because he had not been featured 
in the billing. Mr. Welch said that he 
had been accustomed to have his name 
in the largest type made and could not 
understand why an exception should lie 
made on the occasion of a benefit. 



WALDRON HAS ANOTHER IN BOSTON. 

A site for a new burlesque theatre in 
Itoslon has been secured by Chas. Wal- 
dron, manager of the Palace Theatre in 
that city. 

The new house will have a capacity of 
1 ,»m0 ami will play the shows of the Bast 
ern I'urlesipie Wheel. 



HERE'S A BET. 

A |>erson closely identified with the 
Keith-Proctor Interests offers to wager a 
small sum of money that the Chestnut 
Street Theatre, Philadelphia, will not lie 
opened as a vaudeville house next season, 
ami that no other house in the Quaker 
City can l>e had for that purpose, with 
the possible exception of the Grand Opers 
House- ami he doesn't think that even 
that could be secured, lie insists that 
combinations will play out the entire sea 
son at the Chestnut Street house. 



RAYMOND AND CAVERLY JOIN K. & E. 

It has been reported this week that 
Raymond and Caverlv. the Cerman come- 
dians, have signed a contract to play ex- 
elusivelv under Klaw & Erla user's direc- 
tion, replacing the Rogers Brothers in the 
affections of the firm. 



EASTERN WHEEL IMPROVING 
HOUSES. 

Alterations are being extensively made 
over the Eastern Burlesque Wheel's cir- 
cuit of theatres. 

In the Standard Theatre at Cincinnati 
the entire balcony and gallery have been 
torn out and reconstructed. This will in- 
crease the seating capacity about 400. 

The Majestic in Kansas City has had a 
gallery holding 500 added to its interior, 
and new dressing rooms have been built. 

A contract has been given to change 
the Lyceum Theatre in Boston to a around 
Moor house and increase the capacity 000. 

Alterations will be made on the West- 
minster at Providence tending to improve 
that house. 




M. E. NIBBE AND MARIE B0RD0UEX, 
••The Two IlalUniB," 

III V:iu<l. -villf. 



VARIETY 



MARTIN BECK TALKS. 

Martin Beck, the general manager of 
the Orpheum Circuit now in combination 
through the Western Vaudeville Associa- 
tion with Keith, was asked for a state- 
ment of his views on the merger. Mr. 
Heck said: "I think it is going to help 
everybody. We can give fifty good weeks 
or so and book an artist right through. 
Of course some artists are satisfied with 
thirty -five or forty weeks. They don't 
care to work more during a season. We 
can take care of everybody." 

Asked what changes if any the new 
deal would make in the plans of the West- 
ern Vaudeville Association, and the situa- 
tion of John Cort in the Northwest to 
book through it, Mr. Keck replied: "There 
will be no material changes. The book- 
ings will be carried on the same. In fact, 
I am going to Europe about August 1 to 
arrange for the opening of booking of- 
fices in London and Paris. We shall book 
for John Cort. He has made a contract, 
and unless he breaks it it will be carried 
out by us. If he decides not to give 
vaudeville as now planned, that is another 
question, but we will still hold the con- 
tract to book anyway." 



MYERS REMAINS IN ATLANTIC CITY. 
Although Henry Myers will give up the 
management of the vaudeville theatre on 
Young's Tier at Atlantic City on July 1, 
he will continue vaudeville at the seaside 
resort in another location along the board- 
walk. Mr. Myers has been busy this week 
looking after the Philadelphia project 
mention of which was made in Variety 
last week. This includes a roof garden 
on a nvw, Philadelphia "sky-sera per" to t>e 
open the year around. In the cold 
weather it will be enclosed and called a 
"winter garden." 



POLI BUILDING IN SCRANTON. 
Scran ton, Pa., June 22. 

The contracts for building the new Poli 
vaudeville theatre on Wyoming avenue 
have been let and work will be at once 
commenced* 

S. Z. Poli when here said the contractors 
would be required to file a bond to have 
the house completed by November 15 and 
employ none but union workmen. 

Mr. Poli enthused over the prospect and 
issued a statement that high-grade bills 
only would be presented. 



"RAIN-DEARS" SIGN WITH BECK. 

The "Rain-Dears," the "girl act" of the 
Ned Wayburn'a Attractions, the corpora- 
tion of which Mr. Wayburn is the heed, 
has been signed for next season by Martin 
Peck to travel with the Orpheum road 
show. 

The show opens at Williams' Colonial 
Theatre In New York on September 10. 
That sets at rest the question as to 
whether it would play the Williams houses 
the coining season. 



IS IT POSSIBLE? 

The Keith Agency claims that under 
the new order of affairs as they exist 
they are enabled to lay out routes for 
artists that will reduce the cost of trans- 
portation through jumps that range from 
street car fares to thirteen dollars. The 
average, it is said, will be in the neigh 
lmrhood of $1.00. 



ARTISTS' FORUM 

. 

Coaflaa your Utters to 150 ward* and writ* on on* side of paper only. 
Anonymous communications will not be printed. Name of writer must be signed and will b» 
held In strict confidence. If desired. 



Wichita, Kan., June 14. 
I'M it or Variety: 

Sir Olson Bros. & Baldwin will pay to 
any person or persons engaged in the the- 
atrical business as performers the sum 
of one hundred dollars within one minute 
after they will come to this city and make 
oath before a notary public; that Olson 
Hros. & Baldwin owe one cent to any {kt- 
son or persons who have ever made or 
signed contracts to work for the said Ol- 
son Bros. & Baldwin, and we will pay one 
hundred dollars to the editor of Variety 
if he or any correspondent connected with 
his paper will come to this city of Wichita 
and make oath that Ring and Williams, 
Davis Sisters, Nairn Ja flier, (Jilmore and 
LaMoyne, Woodbines and Madam Phillips 
constituted the bill at Vinewood Park, To- 
peka, the week of May G or any week 
.since the park opened this year. 

We will give one hundred dollars if we 
cannot prove Variety or its Topeka corre- 
spondent, or the correspondent who fur- 
nished the malicious article published in 
your paper of May 20. UKXi, on page two 
to be a liar. 

Olson Bros. & Baldwin's references are 
Fourth National Bank, Wichita; Wichita 
CJas and Light Co., Boston Store, Smyth 
Hardware Co., Santa Fc station agent, 
('ox, Diamond tt Joohoo Oo. and many 

others. Olson lirott. <(• Italduin. 

I The above unparliamentary mixed chal- 
lenge from Olson Bros. & Baldwin is Hat ly 
contradicted by the letter published in this 
column last week, written by F. (J. Kel- 
ley, secretary of the Topeka Railway Com- 
pany (controlling Vinewood Park at Tope- 
ka), in reply to a demand by Ring and 
Williams, one of the unfortunate acts, de- 
manding their salary. The following quo- 
tation appeared in Mr. Kclley's communi 
cation: "I have a letter from Mr. Bald 
win saying that he will be in the city in 
a few davs and indicating that he will be 
willing to compromise the salaries of the 
actors who were here at the same time 
you were. I think, as unreliable a party 
(Baldwin) as he seems to be, that any- 
thing you could get would be simply vel- 
vet." 

The financial responsibility seems to 
have resolved itself into a question of ve- 
racity between Olson Bros. A Baldwin and 
the Street Railway Company. Meantime 
the artists have been defrauded out of 
their money for services rendered, al 
though the booking firm -■till persists in 
claiming that their obligations, either 
moral or legal, have always been met. 
Kw.] 



T 



Chicago, dune la. 

Kditor Variety : 

Sir I wish to warn artists in this vi 
cinity against one Mi>s Jennie Campbell, 
who runs the Bijou Theatre at Calumet, 
Mich. She resorts to the most despicable 
methods imaginable in order to beat the 
artists out of their salaries. 

T played for her the week of May 2H. 
Tried my best to endure her all week, as 
the transportation back to < hieago is 
$13.2T>, an. I I had paid $(i.C»0 to go there 
from Marinette, Wis. On my closing 
Sunday nijrht. knowing that 1 had to 



make the 9:30 p.m. train for Escanaba, 
she took advantage of this and handed me 
my salary less $5, telling me that that 
was all she would pay singles in the fu- 
ture. 

I had a contract received through Mr. 
Sternad of the Western Vaudeville Asso- 
ciation, but notwithstanding it she abso- 
lutely refused to pay the amount it called 
for. 1 have since learned that she has 
practiced the' same trick on several other 
artists. 

Jt only goes to show that contracts are 
worthless to an artist as far as these 
little houses are concerned. Another rea- 
son why we should organize. 

Jan. T. Dentin. 



Kditor Variety: 

Sir— 1 was more than surprised to read 
that article in your reliable paper, headed 
"Wilson and Flynn Didn't Make Good." 

The following are the facts and we feel 
that you will give them in order to set us 
light in the estimation of your readers. 

The (J rand Street Theatre was giving 
vaudeville under a lease held by a Mr. 
A. llartson. He called at our ollicc and 
desired us to take an interest in the ven- 
ture. 

We agreed to invest dollar for dollar 
with him, providing that there were no 
liabilities hanging over the place. 

We learned later on that Rolsrt (Iran 
held an order for $100 and also heard that 
several acts, including the Postal Tele- 
graph Hoys and Wentworth and Vesta, 
received no salary for the week ending 
dune 0. 

We then decided to turn down the prop- 
osition and in order to act fair and square 
to all parties concerned wo told the art- 
ists to report for their engagements, but 
to be sure and learn who was the respon- 
sible party and whom they would look to 
for their salary. The acts that were 
booked there by us were Wilson and Rich, 
Hanson and dames, Lipson and Lipson, 
Bush and Lorand. the Fantas. Hayes 
and Wynne. Mr. llartson closed Lipson 
and Lipson before they opened, because 
"they were too inquisitive ami wanted to 
know too much." Hanson and James 
worked both shows Mondav and then 

l 

asked for part payment of their salary 
and were closed for so asking. 

The other people worked and under my 
advice and instruct ions asked for their 
pro rata salary every dav ami usually 
were successful in getting it. 1 told all 
the artists engaged to look out. for No. 
1. and T did just as I deemed right in the 
whole matter. 1 did not see Mr. llartson 
alter Thursday evening, June 7, and when 
his representative, Mr. l*cw Watson, asked 
me it we intended going into the venture 
I told him that Mr. llartson would have 
to explain certain hazy transactions 
(meaning the salaries due performers) be- 
fore 1 would consider it. He then said. 
"Well, you'll give me a program, won't, 
you?" T said. "Yes, but I'll have to put 
the artists on to the fact that there is no 
financial strength to the venture.'' I 
would like to state that Mr. \a>\\ Watson, 
the acting manager of the house, conduct 
ed himself in an especially courteous man 



ner and did all he could to get the per- 
formers their money every night. 

I attach herewith the signatures of the 
various acts who played there under these 
conditions and who are conversant with 
the facts herein stated. 

Trust you will treat this matter with 
the fair spirit and courteous method for 
which you are rapidly becoming noted. 

Jas. D. Flynn, 
For Wilson & Flynn. 

I Signatures of the acta as stated above 
were attached to a statement that "the 
above letter is true in every particular." — 
Bo.] 



June 16. 
Kditor Variety: 

Sir — In looking over your valuable pa- 
per to-day (June 10) I notice that your 
correspondent at Albany in commenting 
on the bill at Electric Park there says 
that "Maxwell and Dudley were fair." I 
wish you would kindly deny the fact that 
we were there, as we have been laying off 
during the present week in this city, so 
could not have been in two places at the 
one time. In justice to artists, we think 
it only fair that managers should change 
the billing matter of their shows when 
they find an act isn't going to play the 
date. Especially when -they have had 
ample time to do so, as so often an in- 
justice is done the artist. 

Maxwell & Dudley. 



MANAGERS AND AGENTS ORGANIZE. 

Chicago, June 22. 
A new social and fraternal organization 
has been promoted here by the theatrical 
managers and agents of this city. The 
organization will be known as the Ama- 
ranth Club and only managers and agents 
will be eligible for membership. Some of 
the members arc Howard Mathewson, 
( 'hris. O. Brown, Adolph Meyers, Edward 
1 layman, Arthur Fnbish, E. P. Car- 
rut hers and Chas. S. Wilshin. 



K. & E. HOLDING OFF. 

A couple of thousand dollars is all that 
stands in the way of Klaw & Erlanger 
leasing the Franklin Square Theatre in 
Worcester. The lease is owned by Tobias 
Burke of Providence and Pat F. Shea of 
Buffalo. The managers of the big syndi- 
cate have had innumerable conferences on 
the subject and refuse to go beyond a 
fixed sum for the lease. 

When the Shuberts took over the 
Worcester Theatre it left K. & E. without 
a house in that town and despite this con- 
dition of affairs they will not yield one 
inch from their position of apparent indif- 
ference to the situation. 



THE HIPPODROME LEASED. 

Contracts probably have been signed 
leasing the New York Hippodrome prop 
erty to a well known theatrical manager. 
There were a number of active bidders, 
among them (Jeorge W. Lederer, who has 
ample backing from some Chicago capital- 
ists. 



F0Y UNDECIDED. 
Eddie Foy has not yet decided whether 
to remain in vaudeville next season or 
sign with a production. He has received 
an o'l'er of ten weeks from the Keith peo- 
ple. 



VARIETY 




Julius Steger. 

"The Fifth Commandment." 

Twenty-third Street. 

For his entrance into vaudeville Julius 
Steger made the happy selection <>f a play- 
let by Willis Stroll in which all the dra- 
matic arts are splendidly blended, and the 
dialogue finely written. The title re- 
lates t<> that biblical injunction to "Honor 
thy father and thy mother." and the story 
b that of a young heiress who has wed a 
a nondescript musician being separated 
from her husband by her parents. The 
mother dies at childbirth, but a daughter 
survives, of whose existence the father 
abroad is unaware. The scene opens at 
the homo of the father-in-law. The daugh- 
ter, now grown to the age of seventeen 
with a passionate fondness for music, has 
invited a singer ami harp player from the 
street into her grandfather's home through 
hearing a song she had been told was her 
mother's favorite. The singer is her 
father. Recognizing a photo on the table 
he relates to his father-in-law in the third 
person the story of his life. Upon acci- 
dentally discovering the daughter he in- 
sists upon his paternal rights and the 
grief-stricken grandfather, acting upon 
the motto, relents, surrendering the girl 
with a presumptive altogether happy exis- 
tence of his reunited family forever after. 
The story is so well told and tense that 
the audience hung upon the players' words. 
Men and women were seen to use hand- 
kerchiefs freelv after the finale. No one 
had credited Mr. .Steger with the dra- 
matic ability to successfully carry through 
a part requiring an art seldom found in 
one supposed to be an operatic fixture 
through the quality of his voice. But Mr. 
Steger played with feeling and sincerity. 
He may have fallen short of the emotional 
heights which might have been reached, 
but that he gave an excellent performance 
is best evidenced by the rapt attention 
he commanded. A capable company sur- 
rounds the star. Julie Heme as the 
♦laughter added a sweet simplicity to a 
charming role as conceived by her, and 
Forrest Robinson, the embittered grand- 
father, played clearly and convincingly. 
Tony Pearl was the other street musician, 
playing the accompaniment on a harp for 
the songs of Mr. Steger. Mr. Pearl not 
alone displayed unusual talent in the play- 
ing of this difficult instrument, but he 
suppled the small quantity of comedy 
given to his Italian character in a master- 
ly manner. It was comedy of the thor- 
oughly enjoyable kind, subdued and in- 
sinuated rather than coarse or forced. The 
sketch was staged by Ren Teal and it is 
worthy of study by all vaudeville pro- 
ducers. "The Fifth Commandment" is a 
valuable acquisition to vaudeville. It •« 
edifying and it is a gem. sime. 



Ned Wayburn's Attractions. 

"Rain-Dears." 

.New York Theatre Roof. 

"Rain Dears," the new 'girl act" of the 
Ned Way burn company, having its first 
New York showing 1 his week, proves the 
hit of the season in its claws. There is 
a scenic side rising above the young wo- 
men, and while as a rule "girl acts" de- 
pend upon one novel idea, Mr. Wayhurn 
and his associates have literally bespat- 
tered their latent offering with novelties. 
( >f the four scenes, either "In Toy land"" 
01 "Way I town Yonder in the Oornfield." 
the first and last, is sufficient to guaran- 



NEW AGTS OP THE WEEK 



tee the success. A pu/.zling dress arrange- 
ment is worn in the opening scene taken 
from the "White Cat." Dressed as 
"dude" toys with massive heads, the head- 
gear falls apart, revealing a combination 
>uit. The final setting holds a rain storm 
attachment with genuine water. "In Ice- 
land" the third scene has a "breakaway" 
which is worked in view of the house, 
the setting changing perfectly in a mo- 
ment. Neva Aymar is the leader of the 
girls and looks pretty in her changes, 
particularly so as the boy. Her singing 
voice may be affected by the open air, 
however. There are some lively Way- 
burn dances and a good lot of girls. Red 
stockings are worn throughout. This 
should be corrected. If a machine storm 
in addition could be thrown on the back 
drop it would add an effective finish to 
the present rain scene. "Rain-Dears" can 
be run all summer on the roof and may 
keep on running a long time after. It 
is the easiest scoring act seen this year. 

Sime. 




Carl Hertz. 
Illusions. 
Twenty-third Street. 

It is about five years since Carl Hertz 
appeared in -America. During that time 
he has been playing abroad. Mr. Hertz 
has several illusions and one very good 
"capper." There is nothing of what he 
does that is not simple of explanation, and 
to anyone at all familiar with the myste- 
ries of stage tricks the solution follows 
his work. He is not a rapid operator and 
talks altogether too much. The whole act 
is full of talk, Mr. Hertz going so far as 
to speak to the person behind the black- 
board in tones audible to those in the 
boxes. Again in this trick, called "Bel- 
chazar's Blackboard," the scratching of 
the chalk upon the board may also be dis- 
tinctly heard in front. This illusion is 
supposed to be the star of the act, having 
the "envelope" trick of reading messages 
with it. Another, the Hindoo basket, car- 
ries two women resembling each other the 
most in dress. The really good feature is 
"Aga." The woman rises from a rug laid 
upon the floor. Another, "The Brrtlal 
Chamber," is good for an average audi- 
ence. Mr. Hertz was liked. Anything 
smattering of the supernatural will find 
its admirers and believers if at all skil- 
fully handled. Mr. Hertz, however, has 
a world of room for improvement in every 
way, the most important item at the pres- 
ent time being his talk. Sime. 



Princess Pauline. 

Songs. 

Pastor's. 



\l 



Twelve years have passed away sime the 
last appearance of Princess Pauline in 
this country. She i.s said to have received 
th< royal surname from her Gypsy origin. 
The Princess is singing four .songs at Pas 
tor's this week, but pleasing only with one, 
"I've Got 'Em." Of the others "The Yan- 
kee (iirl" is such a broad bid for applause 
by an English woman that even the Pastor 
audience, notoriously "easy," will not 
fall. Another called "In Sunny Spain" 
has quite the poorest lyric heard in many 
a day. With more suitable selections the 



young woman might do a great deal better, 
but wiM always have to overcome a per- 
fectly Mat voice, without volume or uielodj. 
Of a fetching stride in walking, and a per- 
fect carriage, the Princess, who is of a 
pronounced brunette type, makes a pleasant 
stage picture. She needs to insert an Eng- 
lish accent while singing. It will be bene- 
ficial. Holding over another week at this 
house, a further opportunity will be pre- 
fcented for another showing with other 
numbers. With her present list she is 
helplessly useless for vaudeville. In a 
production she might l>e placed to advan- 
tage. 

Sime. 



Inman, Wakefield and Company. 

"Recognition." 

Pastor's. 



V 



With a special drop representing the ex- 
it rior of a boxing club, and working in 
"one," Inman, Wakefield and company in a 
new sketch made a very good impression 
on the Pastor audience. It is in reality 
a sidewalk conversation, with the sharper 
confidence man relieving the rural ac- 
quaintance of all his money through vari- 
ous tricks and promises. William A. In- 
man as the old Irishman played well, while 
there was a taking breeziness about P. L. 
Wakefield as the "con" man who after- 
ward is discovered to l>e his victim's long- 
lost son. This portion is rather weak, al- 
though full of pathos. Neither is capable 
of handling the dramatic end. Ed Morton, 
the "company," evinced a desire to shooi 
on and off the stage. The sketch is built 
after the style of that in use by Howard 
and North. It will gain laughs and im- 
prove with age. 

Sime. 



V 



Edgar Bixley and Company. 
"The Enchanted Tree." 
Twenty-third Street. 

Mr. Bixley will probably not claim any 
imount of originality for the sketch he 
is presenting this week. The author's 
name is not given. It is a collection of 
comedy material ami talk pieced together 
for laughing purposes. In this it succeeds, 
for the audience laughed moderately, 
while applauding Mr. Bixley generously 
for the parodies he sang. There is one 
amusing and original comedy incident 
shown in the use of a barrel for an ele- 
vator. The action at the opening is slow 
snd should be quickened; also the milk 
bottle should be immediately dispensed 
with. There is no humor in this, even 
though a few weak-minded people laugh 
at the sight. There is a singing finish 
which might be changed without losing 
the music. That could be given as an en- 
core for the parodies. A preferable 
finale might be to have the farmer dis 
cover, after he is struck with the pump- 
kin. Bixley up the tree and proceed to 
"lambast" the "Village Cut-up" as the 
curtain falls. Mr. Bixley in a tramp 
makeup hardly suggests a "cut up." "The 
Village Souse" would be a better name for 
the part. The company is competent for 
the work required, but it might be im- 
proved upon. "Polly" could be eliminated 
and Archie Glue might have more added 
to hi* part, with an injection of ginger on 



the side. Altogether too much time is^ 
given to the mule. The act will never be 
a big comedy hit, but may be worked into 
a laughing success, with Bixley's songs al- 
ways as a safeguard. Sime. 




Nellie Beaumont and Company. 
"My Busy Day." 
Twenty-third Street. 

Nellie Beaumont is not a stranger to 
vaudeville, but is appearing this week in 
a new offering by (jJeorge Totten S'mith. 
It is named "My Busy Day" and the airi- 
ness of the title is indicative of the plot. 
It allows Mias Beaumont to sing, dance 
and make a change. She has grown thin 
ner, presenting a pretty picture upon the 
stage in the opening, wearing a pink hat 
which is removed all too soon. Pred Wayne 
is chief assistant, playing the part of a 
mischievous office boy. Whether Mr. Wayne 
is attempting to copy Billy B. Van, Miss 
Beaumont's former partner, is not certain, 
although his work at times strongly sug- 
gests that comedian. If so there is no 
reason for it and Mr. Wayne should en- 
deavor to rest solely upon his own meth- 
ods. A monologue given by him for an 
encore pleased some, but it kept Miss 
Beaumont off the stage too long ami this 
should be adjusted. Also some legitimate 
excuse for singing the song immediately 
upon her entrance. When making applica- 
tion for a divorce the reverse follows. M. 
F. Zorn played a colored elevator boy 
without annoving or amusing anyone. Tin- 
sketch itself is the least commendable 
part of the act. It pleased and may easily 
be worked into a good comedy offering. 

Sime. 



and 0oi 

v 



bmpany. 



Murphy, Whitman 
"Old Friends." 
Pastor's. 

In a bucolic sketch written by Geo. II 
Murphy, in which he has supplied himself 
with the principal part, there is nothing 
new excepting the story, overdrawn an 1 
improbable. The comedy is not of the 
higher class, leaning mostly to dough and 
Hour. The commendable part of the offer- 
ing is the cast. Mr. Murphy and Walt K. 
Whitman are excellent as "rubes," while 
Fannie Monroe as a "Sis Hopkins" sort 
of a hayseed young woman was distinctly 
a hit. Mabel Raymond played a mis 
chievous adopted daughter, looking the 
youthful part perfectly. Some time could 
Ik- taken out by forcing the action and 
when that is done the sketch will be mod 
erately amusing. A special set is carried. 

Sime. 




Juliet Wood and Company. 

Travesty. 

Pastor's. 

Juliet Wood, formerly associated with 
Fred Ray in travesty, has branched out 
for herself in the same line. With Jno, A. 
Byrne, Jr., as he? sup]M>rt, Miss Wood has 
pieced together Some dialogue under the 
title of "Much Ado About Nothing." Mr. 
Byrne has not worked into his part of .. 
King as yet. although his makeup in tin- 
part is humorous. He is now playing too 
stiff and mechanically. Miss Wood by 
comparison stands out strongly. The talk 
is the customary "travesty" sort. <*onsis; 
Inf of puns and jokes, while some real 
comedy is derived through "supers" as sol 
diers. This idea together with the finale 
has been taken from tin- old act as played 



VARIETY 



by Wood and Kay. Miss Wood looks 
well and has a groundwork which can be 
made into a good comedy offering. A special 
M»t i.s required, Miss Wood clinging to 
"one" in this piece That position brings 
the players too close to the audience 

Sim*. 




"Jim Dandy Girls." 
"Girl Act" 

Henderson's. 

Misses Washburn and Flynn, both of 
whom have been identified with burlesque, 
have worked up a fast dancing and singing 
act helped out by a pair of "picks," four 
decidedly attractive girls and pretty light- 
ing effects. The act opens with a dark- 
ened stage, the back drop being a half 
transparency showing a river moonlight 
scene. The girls are singing a negro inel- 
(Mly off stage. All come on with a rush 
and do a fast dance as an incidental to 
the "CJoblin" song. The picks could be 
trained to use their parts of this number 
to better advantage. The second number 
is the bootblack chorus from ''The Social 
Whirl," led by Miss Flynn in knickerbock- 
ers. Time for a change is allowed by a 
rather long dance by the larger of the 
boys and the final number goes with a 
swing to a high closing note that should 
be good for a recall anywhere. The sketch 
made a surprisingly good showing at Co- 
ney Island this week considering the lack 
of lighting facilities and the newness of 
the offering. The four chorus girls have 
been supplied with adequate costumes. 
The two principals dress well and work 
hard. At times they overwork. The act 
should find place. /{uv/i. 



complished by other performers while the 
rings are still should command attention. 
In this instance, however, something is 
lacking, and it is probably a third person. 
One attempts comedy, and he might try 
straight work with his brother, dropping 
the comedy until found to be essential. The 
taller boy is a finished gymnast, graceful 
and neat in this work. One or two new 
tricks are shown, but all the feats might 
be claimed as new through the manner in 
which they are executed. A more flashy 
apparatus would help. 

Sime. 



OUT OF TOWN 



/ 




Work and Ower. 

Comedy Acrobats. 

New York Theatre Roof. 

Billed as the "first American appear- 
ance" and "Europe's newest scream," it 
appeared to those present on Monday even- 
ing that the foreigners are easily amused. 
Some familiar ground tumbling having a 
poor brand of comedy running through 
it prevented the team from being liked, 
although one new trick was shown. Col- 
lins and Hart were represented in the 
comical part, some of their comedy hav- 
ing evidently been left over on the other 
*ide ami appropriated by this team who 
brought it back to the place of begin- 
ning. Appearing after the Stein-Kret tos 
was a disadvantage, but Work ami Ower 
will never do over here in good company. 

Simc. 




Hanson and Nelson. 
Sister Act. 
Henderson's. 

These girls were formerly together, but 
for four years have been going their sev- 
eral ways. Their new dancing and sing- 
ing sketch is splendidly costumed and 
well put together. Both have voices of 
Ample volume and a not unpleasant quel- 
ily. ami the Blftp Fay imitation of the 
taller girl gave the act an effective touch 
of comedy, although this specialty would 
lose nothing by being toned down a bit. 

Rush. 



Alvin Brothers. 
Flying Rings. 
Pastor's. 

Two boys doing acrobatic feats on the 
flying rings while swinging generally a: - 




Laurance and Grace Sylvester. 

Versatility. 

Pastor's. 

No name may be applied to this offering 
excepting versatility. The program calls 
it "Mike Murphy's Mistake," but Mr. Syl- 
vester attempts so much that the reason 
for the title is lost. As a comedian at 
the opening he does not fare too well, but 
or the rings he is just passable, with a 
new undressing idea. Another change 
bring*; him in "one" with a song and 
•lance. Miss Sylvester is a sweet-looking 
little person with a small still voice. So 
quiet that she should do a "kid" part and 
songs without waiting one moment. Her 
appearance will carry her through if noth- 
ing else. »S'»me. 




Nellia Butler and Company. 
Farcical Sketch. 
Keith's. 

A capable pair who get more out of 
a complicated farcical plot involving a 
vast amount of horse play than would 
most others. The narrative has to do 
with a sporty husband, a jealous wife, a 
French marriage ceremony that was not 
binding, and a will under which the hus- 
band was to inherit a fortune provided 
he was not married at the time of the 
testator's death. Upon this were piled 
complications enough to fill out a three- 
act farce. Both principals worked hard, 
and got most of their points over the 
lights. While the text is too talky the 
pair save themselves by roughness and 
noise which catches the upper house. Miss 
Butler looks well in a black gown and 
plays with certainty and confidence. In 
their search for a finish warranted to 
yield the shy and elusive "hand" the au- 
thor, Herbert Hall Winslow, lias gone far 
afield to drag in the American flag. 

Ruth. 



ARTHUR DUNN TAKING A CHANCE. 

Commencing at the opening of next sea- 
son, Arthur Dunn, the diminutive come 
dlan, will pro astarring with himself as 
the "angel" in a play called "The Kittle 
.loker." 

Mr. Dunn's manager will lie D. \V. 
Truss and the bookings will be obtained 
through Klaw A Krlangcr. 

HAMMERSTEIN PLANNING FOR 
NEXT SUMMER. 

Oscar llammerstein has commissioned 
Ned Wavburn to devise and stage a mam- 
moth "girl act" for the Victoria Roof. It 
i> to be produced next summer, and the 
year's advance notice was given to Mr. 
Wayburn in order that a "stunner" might 
be gotten up. 



Una Clayton and Company. 
"What's in a Name." 
Majestic, Chicago. 

The troubles of married life are exposed 
in "What's in a Name." The plot is in- 
teresting and serves as a good foundation 
for the bright dialogue and rapid situa- 
tions. Miss Clayton is an emotional ac- 
tress and some of the scenes in the play- 
let indicate that a more serious sketch 
would give her better opportunities for the 
display of dramatic talent and emotional 
l>ower. Francis Morey gave good support 
in a thoroughly capable manner, while 
Marie Gebhardt was pleasing. The 
sketch was liked. Frank Wienberg. 



E. Frederick Hawley and Company. 
"The Bandit." . 
Majestic, Chicago. 

"The Bandit" is a one-act melodrama that 
thrilled and held the audience for over 
twenty minutes. The scene shows t Ii — 
abode of a Mexican outlaw. . Mr. Hawley 
ax the bandit gave a clear and conscien- 
tious portrayal of the part, acting with 
force and dramatic power. Frances 
Ifaight ns the captive was excellent, whik» 
If. B. Rowe looked well as a Mexican out 
law. Frank Wiexberg. 



WILL HAVE TWENTY ACTS. 

The corporation of Ned Wayburn's 
which was organized as a vaudeville pro- 
ducer is living up to its intentions. 

Besides the acts which have been pro- 
duced there are sufficient under way and 
planned to give the concern twenty „vaude- 
ville acts for immediate use by Septem- 
ber 1. 

Mr. Wayburn believes he will give vaude- 
ville a novelty of value in a new aerial 
ballet. It has been about completed and 
is entirely new in conception, being worked 
on different lines from those of the same 
nature previously shown in Mroadway 
spectacles. 

Gertrude Oarli.sle has also been placed 
under contract and will appear in one of 
the acts. 

Mr. Wayburn says the report that a 
change is impending in his producing com- 
pany wns foolish. 



The four Sullvs will 1m> six next .season, 
with a new sketch also. 



RECEIVER IN ATHLETIC PARK. 

New Orleans, June 22. 
Athletic Park hns gone into the hands 
of a receiver. Arthur Leopold, an attorney 
of this city and a stockholder in the park. 
has been appointed. Archie Cox. wh > 
last managed the park, has accepted a lu- 
crative position in Sail Lake City. 'Hie 
park will reopen June 24 with the Maud 
Daniels company. 

GROVER STILL HOLDS IMPERIAL. 

William T. drover, the Brooklyn vaude- 
\ ille ' manager, denies that the Shuberts 
have taken the imperial Theatre, in which 
Mr. drover attempted to put vaudeville 
last year. 

"I still hold the lease on the Imperial," 
said Mr. drover at Brighton Reach this 
week. "T have not yet decided to what 
use T shall put the house next season. I 
am considering the matter now and by 
the first of next month will have made 
my arrangements for the coming vear." 



AFTER STELLA MAYHEW. 

An offer was made to Stella Mayhew, 
the comedienne, this week by the Boyle 
Agency for a vaudeville tour, two weeks 
awaiting her pleasure at the seaside. 

No great hope is entertained that Miss 
Mayhew will accept the offer. Her con- 
tract with the Joe Weber company calls 
for her services next season and Mr. Web- 
er is unlikely to release her for a vaude- 
ville appearance. 



BOOK THEMSELVES. 

Logansport, I ml., June 22. 

Variety's article last week saying that 
Amnions & Dubois, the proprietors of the 
Crystal circuit of vaudeville theatres, book 
through the former Henderson Agency in 
Chicago has caused a "gun" expedition in 
search of your correspondent here. 

The firm books independently, with 
headquarters in Marion, Ind. The oppo- 
sition to the Crystal circuit throughout 
the state placed their bookings with the 
Henderson people. 



RAILROAD SETTLED. 

Owing to an accident received on one of 
the Newark Traction Oo.'s surface cars 
last week, W. K. Whittle, the ventrilo- 
quist, was unable to appear at Electric 
Park in that city, where he had been 
booked. 

Mr. Whittle settled the damage with 
the company at $350 without legal inter- 
ference. 



MARIE'S SONGS. 

When Marie Lloyd comes to America 
next season under the direction of Percy 
Williams she will revive her famous song 
hit, "The Costers Wedding." Two other 
songs she will render are "There Was 
Something on His Mind" and "The Cus- 
tom of the Count rv." 



AERIAL "TRY-OUTS." 

M. S. Bent ham tried out five new acts 
on the Aerial Koof dardefn on Thursday. 
He has set aside every Thursday afternoon 
for the remainder of the summer for a 
similar purpose. 




NELLA BERGEN. 

Now slnulTitf one of tin* principal roles In Bouaa's 
Sew opera, "Tin- Free T/onee," at the New Amster 
■lam Theatre. Ml** Jtergcn will bo beard again In 
vaudeville aft<>r the regular season terminates. 



10 



VARIETY 






Shows of the Week 



By Sime 



PASTOR'S. 

It is doubtful if Mr. Pastor will equal 
tliis summer the show he is presenting thu 
week. New acts are plentiful in it, ami 
this always lends additional interest even 
to tlie casual goer. 

Through a freak of l>ooking in which 
the i>oints of interest in the acts were not 
specifically stated in all cases, there are 
two ring and two wire acts on the bill. 

Princess Pauline, Ininan, Wakefield and 
company, Murphy, Whitman and com- 
pany, Juliet Wood and comimny, Alvin 
Brother! and Laurence and Grace Sylves- 
ter, all new to this house, are reviewed un- 
der New Acts. 

Dixon, Bowers and Dixon with Anna 
Hurt were a late number to appear. The 
girl walks a tight wire and does some con 
tortious. The men dressed as "rubes" 
supply a certain quantity of comedy, fin- 
ishing with a "baseball" encore. One of 
the former members of the trio is missing, 
he having been replaced, with Miss Burt 
added. Much of the old material remains 
and the act gained laughs, although the 
girl seems to be the principal. 

The Four Sullys in "An Interrupted 
Honeymoon" are depending upon the two 
bright youngsters and have added" a novel 
ty for an encore in the form of a very 
young baby brought upon the stage. It is 
in i>oor taste. 

Marshall, the mystic, draws laughs 
through his manipulation of hats and an 
"egg" trick. There are two points which 
Mr. Marshall might explain. Whether Ik» 
did some of the hat work before the late 
Sparrow, and if his "egg" trick antedates 
the similar one of Horace Goldin. In 
the latter case, however, Mr. Marshall ex- 
eels Goldin in the trick, doing twice as 
much in and at the same time. 

Osborne and Wallace have played Fas- 
tor's several times this season. The audi- 
ence is growing accustomed to the team. 

1.41 Centra and La Hue are a man an 1 
woman who play musical instruments and 
try very hard for approval, which they re- 
ceive in some degree. The man works in 
blackface, and although a small act it is 
ambitious. What apparatus they have has 
been worked upon for a very showy effect 
and the electrical illumination helps a great 
dcal. vv ~ In these days of American flags 
and Patriotic airs in connection with music 
there is much that may be forgiven in re- 
turn for the absence of the customary dis- 
play! 

Sid Baxter assisted by Blanche South* 
wick were also on the bill. 



A PRODUCING VAUDEVILLE FIRM. 

A new firm has been established for the 
purpose of producing and properly ex- 
ploiting vaudeville novelties. The concern 
styles itself Sanger & Pitman and is com- 
posed of Eugene Sanger and Richard Pit- 
man. Mr. Sanger has been on the stage 
for the past twenty-four years with many 
prominent stars as actor and stage direc- 
tor and during ten years of that time he 
was on the variety stage. Mr. Pitman 
was last season leading man with Will- 
iam 11. Crane and for eight years pre- 
viously was a mem tier of E. H. Stot'henf^s 
companies. The first of the firm's presen- 
tations will be a big scenic production 
by Edward MeWade and Eugene Sanger, 
entitled "Drum-Head Court Martial." li 
is described as a twenty -minute melo- 
dramatic comedy. 



NEW YORK THEATRE ROOF. 

Vigorous action and some money have 
done wonders for the bill on the New 
York Roof) and if the adverse opinions 
<>f the critics after the opening perform- 
ance can be counteracted the managers 
will have no reason to regret their ten- 
I ncy. 

"Rain-Dears," which bolstered up the 
show wonderfully, and Work and Ower, 
a foreign couple, are reviewed under New 
Acts. 

The Stein-Erettos returned after a long 
absence, with a girl added to the troupe 
of hand and head balancers. The former 
and what were sensational tricks then are 
given again, but have lost novelty 
through repetition by natives. 

The long dive to the table is the finish 
as usual, and there is a new trick or two 
introduced. The men are remarkable 
workmen and win applause easily, but 
have a poor idea of comedy. Such as they 
attempt should be dropped and the act 
given altogether in pantomime. Why the 
girl has been added is difficult to per- 
ceive. Judging from what she did it was 
intended as a portion of the humor. 

The Six Proveanies, all girls, on bi- 
cycles are continuing their successful 
career. All things considered there is no 
cycle act that excels it. The girls arc 
K< od-looking. riders of the first class in the 
solo work, graceful in execution and en- 
joy the work, which mains it attractive 
to the front of the house.^ The little girl 
is full of animation and jiossesses per- 
sonality to a large degree. 

Salerno with his skillful juggling is 
proving the big hit predicted, although he 
seems unable to grow accustomed to the 
roof, making slips seldom occurring in an 
enclosed theatre. 

"Seeing New York," the musical piece 
causing all the damage at the opening 
two weeks ago, has liecn hacked, hewed 
and demolished until one hour and five 
minutes only are left. The piece is still 
full to overflowing of Clifton Crawford 
and Carrie De Mar. Some dialogue re- 
mains and Crawford handles the most of 
it. His voice does not carry to either 
sidefof the house. 

The fifteen girls in the chorus are made 
to fill the stage through being dressed 
and placed well, but Cheridah Simpson is 
the star dresser of the performance. Miss 
Simpson has seldom looked better than she 
does in this piece. 

A new scene has been added advertising 
Levey, the cleaning man. The idea was 
taken from the defunct "Poster Girls," 
and the bill board setting is plastered 
with the name of the dress renovator, who 
put the scene on complete at his own ex- 
pense even to the costumes. 

If twenty minutes were to be taken out 
of the piece, with a vaudeville act added, 
the result would he a swift moving bill 
and as at present constituted, with one 
exception, equal to any roof show* that 
could be arranged. 

"While on her way to South Africa to 
play in the halls there Libbie Arnold 
Blondell stopped ofT long enough at Ma- 
deira to p«»st home an illustrated card 
saying she was enjoying the trip. Miss 
Blondell, according to general report. j>os 
vessel a happy faculty of enjoying herself 
anywhere. 



TWENTY-THIRD STREET. 

Proctor's Twenty-third Street Theatre 
is presenting this week what would be an 
unusually good bill at any season of the 
year. 

That the people dowutown realize "a 
show" is in progress is plainly evident 
from the attendance. On Tuesday night 
the theatre was simply packed. 

A distinct drawing card in Julius Ste- 
gcr is partly responsible for the good at- 
tendance. Mr. Stcger with Carl Hertz, 
Xellie Beaumont and Edgar Bixley will be 
fcund under New Acts. 

Four numbers out of the programmed 
nine receive that classification and Spa- 
donij the juggler, might also be included, 
he appearing here for the first time since 
leaving the country. 

Spadoni has added two new tricks as 
tar as he is concerned, although Salerno 
brought them over here. In the heavy 
work there has been no change. The 
mounting for the cannon is a "toboggan" 
instead of the former springboard, but the 
board was more effective. A new suit of 
tights sets off the juggler's physical pro- 
portions, and he now wears the upper por- 
tion decollete, displaying a perfectly 
smooth breast to the waist almost. It is 
A pretty sight. 

Following the tearful result'L of "The 
Fifth Commandment," Mr. Sieger's sketch, 
Raymond and Cuverly not alone had that 
to overcome but position as well, they oc- 
cupying the next to closing number. The 
"Dutch* laying! obliged the audience to 
laugh after a short spell, and the bur- 
lesque operatic finish of the team did the 
rest. Many local "gJ»gs" were sandwiched 
in, but the audience preferred the old and 
standard jokes. 

No regular imitator's routine is complete 
nowadays without an imaginary curtain 
speech of Richard Mansfield, and Taylor 
Holmes, who has composed his monolgue 
of a varied assortment, is no exception. 
Mr. Holmes believes also that he is giving 
an imitation of Eddie Foy. He was well 
liked when he was just Taylor Holmes, 
but it will be a difficult matter for Mr. 
Holmes to separate himself on the stage 
from the famous people he has heard of 
but evidently not seen. 

'Hie three Ronays. the French girls who 
first appeared at the Hippodrome, are here 
with their musical and other endeavors, 
and have a neat little act in its entirely 
which could be greatly improved by an 
appropriate setting around it. Cus Leon- 
ard, (ho musical magician, opened the 
bill, while an orchestra strange to this 
house supplied the music. The orchestra 
leader is now Harry Collins, and a feature 
of it is that the musicians can read the 
music, but don't seem to know what they 
are playing. 



LONDON NOTES. 



An Anglo-American syndicate has de- 
cided to run a big Christmas Fair at 
Olympia, based on international lines. 
There will be a circus, a pantomime, a 
new version of Mazeppa and "All the Fun 
of the Fair" at cheap admission. 



Card King Carlton, the 'Human Hair 
Pin." is making much hay in the absence 
<>f his emigrated rival Tom Hearn. Mr. 
Rarrasford has decided to enlarge I he 
Leeds Tivoli and call it The Hippodrome. 
At present it seats about 2,o00. 



Willie Brothers, head balancers, are an- 
nounced at Leeds as "undoubtedly the 
handsomest young men on the variety 
stage." 



East End Hebrews of the humbler class 
are voted very quaint at the Pavilion. 
They claim to be "America's greatest He- 
brew dialect comedians." As opposition the 
l/owcnmirth Brothers took a chance at 
Collins' Music Hall and though put ou 
late at 11:05 made a success and were 
shifted to a better place. They advertise 
as "Not the Greatest Hebrew Comedians 
in the World," and refer to such others 
as "Dave Warfield, Weber and Fields, 
etc." 



Manager Frank Weeks of the South 
London is off for a fortnight's holiday in 
the Channel Isle of Jersey, where Langtr; 
erstwhile took her lily bloom. Weeks has 
army antecedents and is a firm, able and 
popular man. 



Vestp Victoria has a severe cold, but 
still does her triple round nightly. The 
average London hall gives si>eoial facilities 
for taking cold, as obsequious lackeys 
honor arriving stars by holding stage doors 
open for a long period, the wind blowing 
through in fine style. In winter some of 
these places are like barns, with no fire 
outside the manager's office. Of course 
this does not apply to later and better 
halls, which are magnificently up to date. 



The new llolborn Empire of Walter 
Gibbons is a hall of rich beauty and is 
doing enormous business. So with his 
latest venture, the Croydon Palace. As 
Gibbons now dissociates his halls from the 
list of George Adney Payne there are whis- 
pers that the circuits are drifting apart. 
We shall see. The Lyceum closed quietly 
last Saturday night. Gatti's West- 
minster still continues closed, though at 
least one man has shrewdly surmised to 
me that money can be made at that hall, 
granted the right man and management. 
The location is fine and many good un- 
barred acts could bo picked up for it by 
a real live act hunter. 



Mr. Pinero saw Rose Stahl at the Palace 
and now they say she is scheduled for a 
Frolunan play and a West End bow in the 
legitimate, to which she is no stranger 
Mathews and Ashley, cross-talk comedians. 
are the last successful opening at the 
Palace. 



The white-wigged minstrel first part at 
the Ellon Terry benefit, with Manager Sey- 
mour Hicks in the middle and eminent 
folk playing "corner men" or "end men,*' 
will no doubt boom minstrelsy a little. 
Some think the proposed M. B. Leavitt 
venture, which will bring back producer 
Barney Fagan, is planned for a ripe time, 
as depressed minstrelsy is likely to boom 
up. 



The Variety Artiste**' Federation will 
hold its general meeting about July 10 to 
elect officers and adopt a constitution, etc. 
For president the contest would seem to lie 
mainly between Charles Goboru and the 
present organizer, Frank Gerald. 



VARIETY 



II 



Shows of the Week 



By Rush 









BRIGHTON BEACH. 

William T. drover*! seaside music ball 
opened for the summer this week with ;i 
capital bill headed by Georgia (aine and 
Harry 11. Lester. This is Miss ('.line's 
first vaudeville appearance in Brooklyn. 

"An Interrupted Honeymoon" is the 
title of the sketch, which would fare but 
poorly in almost any other hands, but 
which is more than saved by the delight- 
ful personality and clever work of Miss 
Caine. The best minutes of the fifteen or 
so that the pair occupy the stage are those 
which are devoted to several first-rate 
musical numbers. Miss Caine has a voice 
of agreeable quality and her winsome 
stage presence does the rest. Mr. Lester 
was never seen to better advantage and 
his bit of comedy business with a song 
booster in the audience was well worth 
while. 

Charles Burke and Grace LalVue, with 
"The Silver Moon," which was familiar to 
burlesque several years ago, were well 
liked, although their other sketch gives 
the pair better opportunity for the sing- 
ing and dancing. The "Inky Dinks" show 
no falling off in their work in the dancing 
department. 

Calera in a juggling act has the Euro- 
pean hallmark. His best work was in the 
card and coin tricks involving rapid ma- 
nipulation. He would do well, however, to 
use metal disks of not so high a polish. 
Several times in shifting the coins to the 
back of his hand they could be seen to 
Hash in the reflected light. His last trick, 
the balancing of a tea table on three bil- 
liard cues, was palpably faked. 

Seymour and Hill were in the No. 2 po- 
sition and scored unmistakably with their 
fast comedy acrobatics. The man does a 
quantity of clever falls and the pair put 
over enough unique and effective comedy 
to make their act run to a high percent- 
age of laughs. 

The Three Deltons have an acrobatic 
act that stands close to the top. The act 
opens with a slow hand-to-hand stand 
that most of the other acrobats would 
consider a feat worth working up to a 
good deal later. The comedy member does 
not strain too hard for burlesque effects 
and has several strength tests of value. 

Jack Wilson and company made good 
with talk material which was not all new. 
The act is neatly dressed and the three 
members work rapidly, "passing the buck" 
in good style. 

The Transatlantic Four have about the 
usual male quartet layout, except that 
they do not play the comedy quite as 
strong or in quite so broad a vein as the 
average. Another variation from the 
established rule was the uniform dressing 
of the men and the absence of parodies on 
popular songs. The men have good voices 
which blend well. 



Walter Jones and Mabel Ilite have been 
offered forty weeks from the Keith office 
at $3f>0 weekly. The price asked and re- 
ceived when playing the Proctor houses 
was $000. 



HENDERSON'S. 

The Coney Island Music Hall's bill fur 
this week is in reality much better 
than appear! on paper. There are no >big 
names, but the entertainment runs along 
to a reasonably good average. 

The Fourteen Black Hussars hold over 
for the third week. The act remains un- 
changed The ponghhouse finish with the 
bass drums brings the Bowery sightseers 
crowding about the door and the act seems 
to be a favorite with the Henderson pa- 
trons. 

"The Jim Dandy Girls," an act shown 
for the first time, and Hanson and Nelson, 
together again after a four years separa- 
tion, are under New Acts. 

'Hie young American Quintet did well. 
A novel feature of the act is the presence 
of a girl with a strong voice resembling 
that of a boy soprano. This voice dom- 
inates the quintet, giving an odd and al- 
together pleasing effect to the ensemble 
numbers. Their dances were good. 

Daly and Reno make up an acrobatic act 
of value in which there are good original 
comedy falls. Barrel jumping and clean 
tumbling fill the act out. 

Marcus and Ardell show pretty much 
all the work of the Gartelle Brothers. As 
in the latter act, rather too much time is 
taken in the early part by a succession of 
falls and bumps and the talk that ac- 
companies this simple performance is not 
interesting. One of the pair works in 
cork and the other straight. The final 
dance was fairly good. 

Bcdini uses his dog to fair purpose in 
his acrobatic act. The animal itself is a 
well-behaved terrier and moves through 
its work without much prompting. 

The best thing the Imperial Four do is 
a popular medley. At least one of the 
other numbers was not adapted to quartet 
singing. The bass wore a well-fitting 
dress coat, presenting a good appearance, 
but insisted upon wearing his silk hat at 
a rakish angle. 

Jessiea Cree, formerly with "The Four 
Seasons,'' has a neat single act, but should 
select another melody for her fire! whis- 
tling solo. The Toledo Troupe, four con- 
tortionists, have some excellent feats. 
The youngest member is a well -appearing 
boy and his work should be featured more 
strongly. The act is attractively costumed 
in a sort of turner gymnasium suit with 
loose shirts and well-fitting trousers. 

Zara and Stetson have some rather 
weak baton juggling, but finished well 
with double torchon. Martin Brothers get 
a good volume out of two xylophones. 
Among the others were Morton, Temple 
and Morton and Stella Rinehart. 



There is now* some legal controversy 
and fencing as to Mr. St oil's cancellation 
of Coliseum specialties, resultant on re- 
organization. Some of these turns had 
lost much London time by submitting to 
barring conditions, alter which thev were 
suddenly* "let out." 



The Three Olympias, who do statue 
poses in imitation bronze and who were 
scheduled to soon be one of the attrac- 
tions at the Hippodrome, have put for- 
ward their New* York engagement until 
some time in 1907. 



Business on the Victoria Hoof has 
reached such proportions that Oscar Ham - 
merstein concluded on Tuesday to sus- 
pend the "deadhead*' li.st. A large num- 
ber of the people who had previously 
been accorded the courtesy of the roof 
were stopped at the door. 



HAMMERSTEIN'S. 

Some pretty raw work characterized the 
Fays' performance, which does ahout as 
much harm to the smoothness of the bill 
as would a long wait. Missed cues, re- 
peated failures to catch right names and 
inability to cover breaks in the usual Fay 
style, in addition to the old grammatical 
misdemeanors, gave the turn a decidedly 
amateurish flavor. The strength of the 
act is the medicine-show line of talk pro- 
duced by the man and the comedy talk of 
Mrs. Fay. Even this becomes pretty tire- 
some toward the end. 

Tom Hearn, the lazy juggler, won the 
first laugh of , the evening. He was 
moved forward from No. 9 to No. 4, fol- 
lowing the Spook Minstrels. He got to 
the risibilities of the audience early in 
his act and held to a good percentage 
of laughs throughout. 

The Sharp Brothers opened the bill and 
although their act was accompanied by 
the distracting buzz of late arrivals they 
scored fairly. The closing dance step in 
unison was well liked and the boys had 
several songs in which the voices harmo- 
nized well. 

They were followed by the Camille 
Trio, comedy bar act, whose obvious en- 
slavement to the slapstick did not bring 
the returns that might have been expected 
from such rough burlesque. Their knock- 
abouts would be -a scream in an audience 
composed largely of children or with a 
circus playing the rural districts, but the 
Ham merttein audiences are educated to 
rather higher grade comedy. 

The Spook Minstrels sang in sufficient 
volume to have their voices carry to the 
open-air jKjrtion of the roof without 
straining or injuring the harmony. They 
are working up to the motion pictures 
with a good deal of skill and managed to 
get their applause in the right places. 
The Monday night audience asked for sev- 
eral songs after the five men had dis 
closed themselves. 

Capt. Woodward's seals made a distinct 
hit lw'fore an audience that is notoriously 
not kindly inclined toward straight ani- 
mal acts. Ilie balancing and juggling of 
the animals is startling in its cleverness, 
although it is a natural trait, and the 
comedy is well managed, (lood show- 
nianship is displayed throughout, even to 
the utilization of the disagreeable neces- 
sity of constant feeding for comedy pur- 
poses. 

Collins and Hart in the closing place 
won out against the handicap of their po- 
sition. 'Hie stunt involving a cat and 
a horn won a big laugh and when the pair 
reached their parody acrobatics, what was 
left of the audience stayed to see the act 
out and laugh. 

The Musical Cuttys scored with the 
brasses, but the vocal selection did not 
please so well. The number in which 
string instruments are employed by the 
girls could be improved by the selection 

of more popular music. 

Italia Selhini, with her cheerfully can- 
did display of curves and undulations, 
supplied most of the "beauty interest" of 
the bill, and Cliffe Berzac's Comedy Cir- 
cus and Bice and Prevost were both well 
liked. 



KEITH'S. 

A bill somewhat above the Keith stan- 
dard is offered at the Union Square this 
week. Itobert Milliard and company is the 
presumptive headliuer iu the sketch "As 
Ye Sow," in which he was seen last year. 

Nellie Butler, assisted by Joseph Dai ley 
and a stage hand uniformed as a bellboy, 
is teen for the first time and is reviewed 
under New Acts. 

Merri Osborne has an offering showing 
the essential features of Melville Ellis' 
1 pianologuc," which is to say she delivers 
several imitations to piano accompaniment. 
Miss Osborne is rather too substantial a 
peiaon to be styled chic, but there is a 
suggestion of Frenchiuess about her get- 
up and a delicacy of innuendo about her 
that vaguely recalls Yvette Ouilbert before 
the days of her aspiration toward dignity. 
One of the comedienne's numbers rather 
lends one to think that there has been some 
loosening up in the policy of the Keith 
house touching all things verging upon the 
.suggestive. The little gossipy talk was 
handled with the utmost finesse. 

Hay L. Hoyce has four veritable gems 
of character delineation. His best effort 
was an imitation of a country school super- 
intendent. This was so good it should 
have been used as the climax of his series. 
Mr. Royce is undoubtedly a specialist. His 
work gives evidence of long and careful 
study from life. All his types are skill- 
fully drawn, but it was the last one, that 
or an awkward yokel, that scored most 
positively. The others were drawn more 
closely to life, but were in rather too quiet 
a vein of comedy to catch the fancy of 
Fourteenth street. They should do better 
elsewhere. 

Geiger and Walters call theirs "In the 
Streets of Italy" because they carry a real 
hurdy-gurdy, wear Italian costume and 
l a Ik in the Latin dialect. The man works 
one comedy eatchline to death and the 
woman sings not too well. lie has several 
odd tricks with a violin, one of which was 
the performance of reproducing talk on 

the instrument. This part of the act was 
very amusing and caught on hugely. 

Gertrude Gebest had imitations of 
stage people that were little better than 
fair. Her impersonation of Vesta Victoria 
has been done better and she carries the 
added handicap of incongruous costuming. 
She is an attractive girl and has a voice. 
Hei racetrack recitation gave her a good 
finish and altogether her sprightlineaa and 
agreeable stage presence made her well 
liked. 

Johnnie Stanley and Grace Leonard 
get away from the familiar ran of danc- 
ing and singing teams. They get a good 
start in the good graces of their audiences 
with a fast and entertaining line of talk 
and the good impression is not taken ad- 
vantage of to unduly extend the time of 
the act. 

Milliard's sketch is rather talky and its 
sermonizing somewhat tiresome, but it has 
the proper indite melodramatic value de- 
manded downtown and the Introduction >f 
the "ehce ilde" helps a lot. 

Howard and Howard; Cnron and Her- 
bert, the cadet and Ihe clown; Alexis and 
Scha 11. Rarto and Lafferty and Mile. Edna, 

the whistling girl, were the others. 



The St. Onge Brothers will sail for Ku- 11. A. Mvcrs may arrive back homo dur- 

i"pe on August 7. in'_' Hie next week. 






12 



VARIETY 



TROUBLE IN SIGHT. 

Humors are current of a falling out be- 
tween Klaw &, Erlanger and Felix Isman 
over the leasing of the Chestnut Street 
Theatre, Philadelphia, to Mark Luescher. 
Isman, who controlled the lease, is in 
league with the big syndicate in several 
enterprises, notably Fritzi Scheff. When 
Isman purchased the old Parker House 
property several years ago he announced 
that he would build a theatre thereon and 
that K. & E. would be its lessee. 

Erlanger, it is said, feels that Isman 
should have known that the sympathies of 
the big syndicate and all its allies are with 
the new Keith crowd, and the leasing of 
one of their properties to strengthen an 
opposition circuit is contrary to the amen- 
ities. Another reason may be Erlanger's 
avowed hatred for Luescher. 



MISS AINSWORTH FLUCTUATING. 

Virginia Ainsworth has left the "Flora- 
dora" revival company at the end of the 
second week. The management of the 
company is said to have "notified the or- 
ganization that salaries were about to be 
cut to a summer basis. Miss Ainsworth, 
who was recently a vaudeville possibility, 
indignantly refused to cut the regular scale 
of the Broadway prima donnas' union and 
l>owed herself out of the engagement. By 
(his action she becomes again a presump- 
tive candidate for the continuous. 



"SISTER ACTS" ALWAYS WELCOME. 

"Georgette," who attained some reputa- 
tion several years ago as a singer, has 
entered into an arrangement with Gypsie 
Bellaire, formerly a member of the Joe 
Weber chorus, by which the pair will ap- 
pear next season in vaudeville as a "sis- 
ter act." "Georgette" was married about 
a year ago. She became Mrs. Secor. 
When she comes into the varieties she 
will add coon songs to her old grand 
opera repertoire. 



W. A. FREMONT ATTACKED. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, June 22. 
A lively encounter took place between 
W. A. Fremont, manager of Homes' 
Stock and Vaudeville Shows', W. M. Pol- 
lard, a theatrical agent, and Hugh Mc- 
Phillips. Fremont claims that Pollard and 
McPhjllips attacked him. He had a heavy 
walking cane and used it when one of the 
men cut him on the head. Both Pollard 
and McPhillips were arrested, charged with 
assault and battery. Pollard and McPhil- 
lips claimed Fremont owed them money. 
Recently John Carroll, father of the 
juvenile singers and dancers, Carroll Sis- 
ters, accused Pollard of taking the children 
to Georgetown, Ky., and not paying hotel 
bills or salaries. The performers, some 
dozen in number, were sent back home by 
the Elks and the mayor of Georgetown. 



COMEDIANS 1 CLAIM DISALLOWED. 

r.\ a decision handed down in the Su- 
preme Court this week Sam Siddons and 
Hob Harris are refused a judgment of 
$0,300, the amount claimed on a contract 
with the firm of Weber & Rush. 

Sidman and Harris, according to the 
papers in the case, entered into a verbal 
agreement with Weber & Rush to play 
the German comedian roles in a touring 
"Twirly-Whirly" company. The plaintiffs 
declared that they were promised twenty - 
eight weeks at $300, and that they only 
had seven weeks employment. This was 
in November and December, 1904. 

The court decided that there was no 
contract in evidence and decided for the 
managers. 



COPYRIGHT LAW MEANS MORE 
MONEY. 

In the event of the passage of the new 
copyright law which comes before the next 
session of Congress the owner of a song 
hit will derive a revenue therefrom that 
had heretofore been denied him. It is the 
talking machine rights which have in the 
past been annexed without asking per- 
mission. On the surface it would appear 
that the big talking machine corporations 
would fight such legislation with might 
and main. As a matter of fact they are 
heartily in favor of the proposed law, as 
they can by tying up the various publish- 
ers effectually shut out all opposition and 
especially the smaller manufacturers who 
have been continually underbidding them. 



PATTI DOESN'T WANT VAUDEVILLE. 

William L. Ly kens' trip to Europe to 
secure the services of Adelina Patti for 
vaudeville has been in vain. Much of what 
little chance for success he may have had 
was destroyed by his endeavor to freeze 
out the individual who suggested the idea 
to him and offered to put it through. Ly- 
kens acquiesced and placed the proposition 
before F. F. Proctor, who offered $5,000 a 
week for the services of the diva. Lykens 
then essayed negotiations on his own ac- 
count, with the result that by the time he 
arrived in Europe Mine. Patti had been 
thoroughly prejudiced against the propo- 
sition, saying that she could not possibly 
listen to any offer that involved over 
three performances a week. 






The case of Charles Coborn is again at- 
tracting attention. He has not played 
the London Pavilion since November, 1890, 
nearly sixteen years. Preluding this he 
played a continuous engagement of three 
years at the Pavilion. He lias been boy- 
cotted at other establishments also. Mr. 
Coborn is an intelligent, scholarly man 
and one of the founders of the Music Hall 
Benevolent Fund. He thinks his success- 
ful attempt to save this charity from the 
hands of the wreckers on April 22, 1890, 
was the cause of the boycott. 



ENGLISH MANAGERS STOP BOOKING. 

There is a dullness in the bookings in 
England. The managers over there have 
stopped engaging artists until existing 
contracts have been played. 

Formerly it was the custom to book 
from one to three years ahead, but this 
practice tied up the policy of the houses 
so firmly that it will be abandoned. 

English bills hereafter will be made up 
more on the American plan, although not 
quite as hastily. 



The former Proctor city theatres have 
been brightly decorated with the "Keith- 
Proctor" signs, but Keith's Union Square 
Theatre still retains the solitary electric- 
ally lighted announcement of "Keith's" 
outside the entrance. One door, which is 
open all day, has had painted on it a 
stingy little announcement reading "Keith 
and Proctor." A stranger in town might 
judge the interior to be a clothing store. 



BEARS EXPENSIVE. 

The Hagenlieck bear act, carrying sev- 
enty-five of the White Polar species which 
will appear at the Hippodrome in the 
fall, receives $2,000 weekly, and the man- 
agement provides transportation back ami 
forth, together with feeding and stabling. 
Another "soft" part of the contract allows 
Paul Schurz/thc German agent, and Clif- 
ford C. Fischer, who booked the act for 
the Hippodrome, ten per cent coin mis- 
sion on the weekly salary. 






GLAD TO HEAR IT. 

Mabel Harrison, party of the first part 
in the past famous arithmetical chorus in 
"Babes in Toy land" and who has lately 
been one of the principals in "The Three 
Graces" at Chicago, is East, ready to enter 
vaudeville. 



STEINER WANTS HIS SHARE. 

Alexander Steiner, the agent, claims to 
have been responsible for booking Salerno 
on the New York Roof for the summer, 
but his name does not appear on the con- 
tract. Ten per cent is being regularly de- 
ducted from Salerno's salary for "agent's 
fee," but Mi. Steiner lias not thus far par- 
ticipated in the revenue. He has impor- 
tuned the juggler to pay him an additional 
ten per cent without success. 



PRESS WORK. 

It is alleged that Oscar Ileiiiemami, the 
former manager for Machnow, the giant, 
is the person who notified the authorities 
here that Mr. Hammersteiu's latest impor- 
tation is mentally unsound and succeeded 
in having the Russian detained for one day. 
Heinemann is the individual who sold Wil- 
liam Morris the "Dida" patent rights. 
Morris afterward learned that he had no 
title to the act. 



"SEEING NEW YORK" TO TRAVEL. 

Joseph Hart says that he will send his 
"Seeing New York" review on the road 
at the conclusion of the season on the New 
York Roof Garden. Practically the same 
cast will be retained, with the exception 
of Clifton Crawford, who is booked in 
vaudeville. Considerable dialogue will be 
injected and the piece lengthened to an 
entire evening's entertainment. 



MONEY IN ROLLER SKATES. 

The roller skating rink at Broadway 
and Fifty-third street is reported to be 
making $250 a day at the present time. 
Madison Square Garden is also said to 
be earning large profits. 



BOON MADE A MISTAKE. 

Maurice Boon has worn out three 
"barkers" in the business of attracting 
attention to his five-cent Unique Theatre 
in Grand street. It lately became neces- 
sary to replace the incumbent of that 
high office by one with a fresh voice to 
go into the competition with the street 
and elevated cars. 

The manager turned in a bunch of ad- 
dresses and a letter was sent off in a 
hurry to the most promising of the lot. 
Next day came back the answer: 

"Dear Sir My name is Miss Blanchard, 
not Mr. I don't know what the duties 
of a 'barker' are, but I am a dressmaker 
and no dog." 



QUITE PARTICULAR. 

Kstclle Went worth has resigned the 
prima donna role in "The Tourists" and 
is once more seeking a vaudeville route. 
She has been tendered a "try-out" by 
Hurtig & Seamon at their Metropolis 
Theatre Roof Garden, but will not ac- 
cept a single week even for the purpose 
of breaking in her act. Miss Wentworth 
feels that before she will consent to "strip 
to tights" for a vaudeville audience she 
must have the absolute assurance of an 
entire season's work. It must be that or 
she won't take the leap. 



RENO BUYS FIELD'S ACT. 

George B. Reno, of Reno and Richards, 
has bought from Grace Field the act 
known as "Grace Field and Her Matinee 
Maids" and will probably star his wife 
in it. He has booked it for sixteen weeks 
through the Keith Agency. Miss Field 
has been engaged by Charles Frohman for 
one of his fall productions. 



BERZAC AFTER WOODWARD'S SEALS. 

The troupe of trained seals belonging to 
Oapt. Woodward may be purchased by 
Cliflfe Berzac, the animal trainer. Some 
details are to be arranged about customs 
duties and other minor things before Mr. 
Berzac will close. The price has been set 
and accepted. 

Over forty weeks time have been offered 
Berzac by the Morris office if he secures 
the act. It will go out under the direction 
of Berzac, carrying a trainer along. 



GREEN ROOM CLUB'S LIBRARY. 

Several months ago the Green Room 
Club took up the subject of founding a 
great reference library of dramatic liter- 
ature in a new clubhouse that is soon to 
be erected as the permanent home of 
this organization. 

At a meeting held last Sunday afternoon 
it was decided to follow the suggestion of 
the library committee, and committees 
were appointed to obtain subscriptions and 
for the purpose of arranging for a series 
of six public performances to begin in this 
city Sunday night, July 22. Following 
the performance of July 22 five perform- 
ances will be presented in nearby summer 
resorts, like Atlantic City and Asbury 
Park. 

Franklin Bien, the corporation lawyer, 
was elected chairman of a general com- 
mittee, with Frank Russell as secretary. 
An entertainment committee, consisting of 
Holli8 E. Cooley, George Began, Charles 
Dickson, John Leffler, Ned Wyburn, 
William Morris, Louis Pincus, Edward C. 
White and Raymond Hitchcock, was ap- 
pointed to arrange the bill to be presented. 
During the past week the entertainment 
committee have received offers to appear 
from Elsie Janis, The Fays, Charles J. 
Ross and Mabel Fenton, Edna Aug, Fred 
Walton and company, John T. Kelly, 
Edith Ethel, Gus Hill, Joseph Oiwthorn, 
Al Hart, James J. Morton, James J. Cor- 
bett, The Great Lafayette, Andrew Mack, 
DeWolf Hopper and Raymond Hitchcock. 
Elsie Janis, now en route for England, will 
return to New York in time to appear. 



SHUBERTS' NEW SOUTHERN HOUSE. 

New Orleans, June 22. 
The Shubert8 have leased a new theatre 
now building in Baronne street, but still 
retain the Lyric. The Lyric would make 
a splendid house for burlesque. 



VARIETY 



13 



The opening of "San Francisco" occurred 
Inst Saturday at. "Dreamland," Coney 
I.- land. It is the first spectacular produc- 
tion given based on the recent calamity 
at the Golden Gate. There are fire scenes, 
called "Inception," "Evolution," "Realiza- 
tion," "Destruction," "Incineration" and 
"Resurrect ion." The total time for the 
production consumes about twenty-two 
minutes. One hundred and twenty-five 
people are on the stage, one hundred in 
front of the footlights and the remainder 
composed of stage hands. The production 
as given at the Coney Island resort is an 
expensive one and the building of the 
scenery is a large item. Many "props" are 
required, and in addition to the fixed 
charges a cast has been engaged by the 
managers, Henry Lee, Henry Myers and 
Mark Luescher, which, while rendering the 
playing of the drama realistic, adds much 
to the wrong side of the ledger each week. 
The spectacle carries the audience from 
the days of '49 to the present state of 
devastation of San Francisco and the ac- 
tion is so rapid that the attraction De- 
comes a big drawing card through the 
talk it excites. The opeujug day was 
rainy, but capacity shows were played at 
each performance. There is a plan under 
way whereby the production may be sent 
en tour in the fall, as it could be fitted to 
any indoor stage. The stage at Dream- 
land, where the show is now given, is 
smaller than those in many theatres. 
Owing to the building of a skating rink 
in the "Fire and Flame" enclosure where 
"San Francisco" is located, the stage spaee 
was considerably lessened. Lawrence 
Marston is the stage director of the piece, 
having put it on. 



L. N. Scott, manager of the Metropoli- 
tan Opera House at Minneapolis, Minn., 
Lac Stafford, part owner of the house; M. 
J. Breslauer, of the Northern Display 
Advertising Company, and Theodore L. 
Hays, manager of the Bijou Theatre, have 
incorporated as the Twin City Amusement 
Company. It was the original intention 
of these to play both a "Fighting the 
Flames" and a fireworks show, but the 
date for the former is uncertain. Pain's 
"Fall of Pompeii" will be given, however, 
probably in August — the week of 13 being 
the date of the annual encampment of the 
G. A. R. 



Meriden, Conn., is now holding its cen- 
tennial week celebration. Conventions of 
German Catholics, firemen, bankers and 
others have attracted a large crowd to 
that city, and special amusement features 
are provided daily. About fifteen thou- 
sand visitors are present. 



The Valley Theatre at Syracuse, N. Y., 
under the booking direction of Frank Mel- 
ville will open July 25. The bill for the 
first week will be made up by the Red 
Raven Cadets, Adele Purvis Onri, Harry 
Tsuda, Gallagher and Hild, Libbey and 
Thrayer and Youngs and Brooks. 



MAYBE A THEATRICAL? 

Albert Pulitzer is really serious in his 
intention to start another daily paper in 
New York. He has organized a big syn- 
dicate to finance the scheme, and will 
subscribe liberally of his personal funds. 
A tentative staff of writers has been en- 
gaged. 



8UMM BR PARKS 



LUNA PARK, CONEY ISLAND. 

All the new features of Luna Park are 
now in running order excepting the "wa- 
tershed" coaster. That will be open 
snortly. The feature of the park is un- 
doubtedly "The Great Train Robbery," a 
realistic reproduction of a moving picture 
series which caused much comment when 

shown in vaudeville houses on the screen. 
The setting is in the old Delhi enclo- 
sure at the lower end of the park and 

runs oblong. Through its formation the 
audience is obliged to climb almost per- 
pendicular steps and sit upon each other 
while witnessing the show. There is a 
capacity for about 2,000 people and a 
show may be given every thirty -five min- 
utes. On Decoration Day twelve per- 
formances were run through. 

After the performance opens no one is 
allowed past the gate. This is due to 
the fact that anyone walking into the en- 
closure after all have been seated would 
interrupt the show. 

A Western mining camp is shown in the 
distance across a pond of water, with hill- 
sides stretching away on either side. It 
is located in a "cut" in the "mountains/' 
and the train robbers are seen at the sa- 
loon of the village, drinking and makiug 
merry with the girls. 

There is some pantomime and dancing, 
when horses are mounted, and an an- 
nouncer who describes the first scene ex- 
plains the second, which is to be the rob- 
bery of the fast express. 

The curtain which has been dropped is 
raised, and the same "cut" reveals a rail- 
road track with a miniature express 
speeding across the mountain tops. To 
the accompaniment of bells and whistles 
the "fast express," which should come 
lushing into view, is given a shove by 
someone behind the curtain and slowly 
moves onto the stage. The picture from 
there on is followed out, including the 
chase,' which is not quite so graphic as 
when pictorially shown. 

No attention has been given to the de- 
tails of the production. A good buck 
dancer could be introduced in the first 
scene and at least a presentable curtain 
should be installed. The one now in use 
is a soiled piece of stringy cloth. 

The real engine and coaches and the 
whole effect makes an enjoyable show for 
children. Elderly folk are apt to smile. 

The park in general remains in the 
same crowded condition. The only com- 
fortable place in the enclosure is the 
Japanese tea gardens on the raised bal- 
cony. 

Open air attractions are given and the 
park is doing big business. 

8ime, 



Mike Whallen, after folding his \valk 
tag stick into his vest pocket and /elling 
rich comedy, shows a power of patjfos few 
would suspect in his story of atf Italian 
who 'begs a rose from a stranger because 
his dead wife and child were named after 
the flower. That part of the story told 
in broken Italian, where the man conies 
home and calls several times for hi-* 
"Leetle Rose," only to learn that she has 
passed away, is very touching. 



ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 

Now is the season at the Atlantic Oast 
resort. The hotels are not overcrowded 
but the board walk has a lively appear- 
ance remindful of the Master days of the 
gayly dressed promenaders. 

The various amusement places lined 
along the route of the lengthy gangplank 
are in readiness for the crowds. The 
Steel Pier has a few improvements, but 
its most prominent drawing card is the 
Washington Orchestra Band, an attraction 
able to draw a crowd on a Sunday even- 
ing when an admission of twenty -five 
cent! is charged, with the privilege of re- 
maining on the outside and hearing the 
music equally as well. The band has be- 
come popular through a selection of up- 
to-date melodies, with proper disregard 
for the classical. 

Young's Pier, a trifle farther down the 
walk, is suffering, on the other hand, from 
too much band. Fairman's Boston organi- 
zation plays here, and it has a cornetist 
who is under the impression that his in- 
strument will act in the capacity of a 
danger signal to the sea-going vessels. 
Mr. Cornetist blows as loudly as he can, 
to the detriment of the harmony, the ear 
drums and the vaudeville show given in 
the theatre. The band's music is driven 
through the walls of the theatre at the 
end of the hall, and during the progress 
of the bill a talking turn is turned un- 
consciously into a musical act. Vaude- 
ville is quite the thing on Young's Pier 
and a good bill is provided. 

The new extension to the pier has 
a skating rink and the rolling craze has 
taken hold of the seaside. A moving pic- 
ture of the San Francisco disaster is open, 
while some concessions will probably find 
room in the forward hall. 

Tilyou's Steeplechase is amusing the 
children. There is no comparison between 
the one in Atlantic City and that at Coney 
Island, but the children have great fun 
with a "slide," while the many little turns 
and tricks help to pass time. The vaude- 
ville theatre is steadily used. 

Vaudeville is also given at Guvenator's 
and the Steel Pier, where a minstrel show 
is running. 

Inirersoll's Roller Coaster is in order 
and there is a Hale's Tour. 

The Johnstown Flood, managed by 
Harry Davis, is divided from another of 
his enterprises called "The Bijou" by a 
wooden compartment in the box office, 
but neither are doing big business. 

The Nixon Hippodrome, billed as a 
'million-dollar" venture and announced 
for opening on July 1. has stopped oper- 
ations. Some wooden piles are the only 
indications of expenditures. Even though 
active work is resumed there is no possi- 
bility that the finishing touches can be 
added before the first of the year. 

The new Young's Pier is fast nearing 
completion. Its opening date is set for 
July 1, but that also will be delayed. 

Bime. 



In court the Oxford manager. Middles 
borottgb, explained his keeping open after 
licensed hours by saying a handcuff king 
locked in a coffin was trying to get out. 
The judge let him off with costs. 



Luna Park ai Washington opened last 
Monday. 'I he weather was against a pro- 
pitious attendance, but the managers were 
gratified at the showing. The Navassar 
band, the combined Dial & Armstrong acts 
composed solely of girls, is reported to 
have scored strongly. Much interest was 
felt whether the success met with by this 
band would be through the girls or the 
music. Both contributed and those re- 
sponsible are correspondingly pleased. 



All talk abo'ut the summer resort places 
of amusement makiug huge profits is not 
borne out by the facts. Luna Park, re- 
garded by everybody as the most success- 
ful outdoor place of amusement in the 
world, paid only ten per cent on its stock 
issue the first and second seasons, and last 
year, "due to the reconstruction of Luna 
Park," the stock paid nothing. A number 
of the attractions in the park, however, 
are controlled by subsidiary companies 
and the profits thereon are not shared by 
tho stockholders of the parent organiza- 
tion. 

Reich, Plunkett & Wesley are booking 
for the park at Lake Pontoosac, Pitts 
field. Mass. 



WoodskU Park, at Camden, N. J„ will 
put on vaudeville shortly. 



LONDON NOTES. 

At the Empire Palace, Bdiuboro, Acting 
Manager Charles Cawood is leaving after 
twenty years with the house. At the Lon- 
don Km pi re Mr. Spencer Barry, of Aus- 
tralian experience, has been appointed the 
stage manager. 



It is not exactly true that the Moss 
Empire*! Limited, is an aggregation of 
thirty-six halls. The firm owns certain 
halls and works in close sympathy with a 
smaller group dominated by Oswald Stoll. 
It manages certain halls, for their indi- 
vidual or ' syndicated properties, in consid- 
eration of a fee. Also it forma certain 
halls. These establishments vary widely 
as to business done and performers must 
stand a sharp cut at a few of the smaller 
places. Most are twice nightly, but some 
show one each night. Through the bar- 
ring clause an artist signing the tour shuts 
himself out of thirty towns. 



liondon is much cheaper than New 
York to people who know the town. Rooms 
cost less. A hard link performer can get 
shaved all week for what he pays for one 
shave in America, and buy a Sunday paper 
with the leavings. Car fares are trifling. 
Most music lull Is give free admission to 
artists. Bui when you lay off you lay off, 
and short notice work is scarce. 



An artiste who sang questionable song* 
at the Kinpire, Johannesburg, South Afri- 
ca, had his twelve weeks reduced to «ix 

weeks. This is the first time in fifteen 
vears that a < "titract at this house has 
Iwen curtailed. 



The Hippodrome claims that its great 
water spectacle. 'The Hood," not only 
eooli the Hippodrome air delightfully, but 
confers a public benefit by flushing the 
street drains near it with half a million 
gallons of water weekly. 



i 



14 






VARIETY 



The Chat. K. Harris Couriar CORRESPONDENCE 



Devoted to the interests of Songs and Singers. 

Addreeo all communications to 

(HAS. K. HARRIS, 81 W. Slit St., N. T. 

(Meyer Cohen, Mgr.) 



CHICAGO. ILL. 



two remaining members. Lucy and Luclex are 
spending a three weeks vacation In thel* cottage at 
Muskegon Heights, Mich. 

FRANK WIESBERO. 



Vol. 2. 



New York, June 23, 11HWI. 



No. 6. 



Miss Mario Laurent, a 
sweet soprano singer 
who is a popular fa- 
rorlte over the Kelth- 
Proetor Circuit, now 
piny lug the parks for 
the summer, says that 
"Somewhere," the 
new song, Is without 
a doubt the biggest 
hit that she has ever 
sung, surpassing even 
the success she made 
inr.1 season with 
"Would You Care?" 

The Metropolis Four, 
consisting of the very 
cream of minstrel bal- 
ladlsts, William O. 
Wood, first tenor; 
Harry A. Ellis, second 
tenor; William H. 
Hallett, first bass; 
William Macdonald, 
second bass, are 
knocking them over 
everywhere with 
"Somewhere." Harry 
Ellis, for seven years 
with Dockstader's 
Minstrels, aays: "Tell 
the boys that 'Some- 
where' Is the goods." 

Le Tung Foo, the only 
Chinese baritone In 



the world, who played 

1 In m liters t el li 's Roof 

Garden last week, is 
making a feature of 
"Somewhere," which 
he sings with fine ef- 
fect and Is very much 
taken up with the 
song. Those who have 
not beard this singer 
will be somewhat sur- 
prised at his correct 
pronunciation when 
they do. 
Mitchell and Cain are 
making a feature in 
their act of the great 
march song, "Sister," 
In which Mr. Cain's 
phenomenal tenor 
voice has an oppor- 
tunity of showing It- 
self to Its fullest ex- 
tent. 

Josephine Gasman has 
"Is Everybody 
Happy?" In prepara- 
tion and Intends to 
make it a feature of 
her act. Having had 
considerable experi- 
ence In this line, Miss 
Gasman knows a good 
song when she gets It. 



ANOTHER OLD PROGRAM. 

In line with the 1865 program published 
recently here is one from Mr. Pastor's 
Opera House in 1872. It will be noted 
that it is far more ambitious and more 
familiar names appear: 

TONY PASTOR'S OPERA HOUSE, 

•01 Bowery- 

Tuatday Evening, September 14, 1171. 

PROGRAMME. 



Overture Orchestra 



THE BOY OF THE PERIOD. 

Jim Peachblow Harry Kernell 

Lawyer Bookworm C. F. Seabert 

Erastus plodder Frank Girard 

Hannah Plodder Hen Mason 

Johnny Toothacher Billy Carter 

Peta Lather Johnny Manning 

MISS JENNY ENOEL 

(The Queen of Song) 
In her characteristic serio-comic songs. 



AFTER THE WAR ■ 
(Original.) 
HARRIOAN * HAST. 

TONY PASTOR'S COMIC BONOS. 

TERP8ICHOREAN EVOLUTIONS, 
Miss Kitty Le Roy. 

The Comedian Star Comique, 
QUI WILLIAMS, 
In New and Original Dutch Character Songs 
Written «nd Composed by Himself. 

MARRYING THE WRONG WOMAN. 

Tom Dobbs, alias Parson Jones Hen Mason 

Jimmy Mustard Johnny Manning 

▲Ipblus Peppers C. F. Seabert 

Mrs. Allspice Miss Cecelia Iferd 

Kittle Ginger Amelia Gorenfio 

BILLY CARTER'S BANJO SOLOS, 
(The Country Circus Show, Etc.) 

THE DUTCHMAN'S TROUBLES. 

Judge Bismarck Gus Williams 

Senator Gambettl Frank Girard 

MAGIC CHANGES. 
Ed. Banker. 

THE DAY WE WENT WEST, 
(Original) Harrlgan A Hart. 



First Appearance In New York of 

LA PETITE GEORGIA, 

Pupil of the World- Itonowned PROF. R. RISLKY 
This Infant Prodigy Is the Youngest Gym- 
nast on the Stage. Must Be Seen 
to Be appreciated. 



Overture 



. . . . ■ ■ • 



• •■•••• 



. . Orchestrn 



To Conclude With the Laughable Sketch Entitled 

HOUSEHOLD DIFFICULTIES. 

Caesar, a Servant Hen Mason 

Mr. Brown Frank Girard 

Mrs. Brown Miss Mary Gorenfio 

MATINEES. TUESDAY AND SATURDAY. 

Friday. Ladles' Invitation Night; a Lady Ad- 
mitted' Free With Each Gentleman. 



MAJESTIC (C. E. Draper, mgr. for Kohl A 
Castle i. — One of the best bills of the season is 
presented this week. Eddie Foy, a Chicago prod- 
uct, made his first vaudeville appearance here iu 
"Cartoons of Famous People." The burlesque im- 
personations of Roosevelt and Rockefeller won en- 
thusiastic applause, while Imitations of Vesta Vic- 
toria, although few In the audience had ever seen 
the English comedienne, received several recalls. 
The act In Its entirety made a hit. E. Frederick 
I law ley and company and l'na Clayton and com- 
pany are under New Acts. The Four Emperors of 
Music are expert musicians and were liberally ap- 
plauded. Leah Russell, "the Ghetto girl," made 
her usual hit in songs and character Impersona- 
tion. Gardner and Revere repeated their comedy 
singing and dancing sketch and scored a hit with 
the audience. The Hazardous Globe act Is thrill- 
ing and sensational. It Is performed by a man ami 
woman who go through all sorts of evolutions, 
finishing by a ride on a motor cycle. Irene Frank- 
lin has a sweet voice and manners. Her songs 
were well received. Hcndrlx and I*rescott are good 
dancers. Other numbers on the bill are offered by 
Mi l"u rla ml uud Murray, Hy Greenway, Tipple and 
Kllment and Mury Manning. 

OLYMPIC (Abe Jacobs, mgr.).— Ward and Cur 
ran have a !ot of new material in their time-hon- 
ored sketch, "The Terrible fudge." The Majestic 
Musical Four have one of the liest Instrumental 
acts seen here and scored a success. The comedy 
they interspersed proved diverting. Keno, Walsh 
and Melrose are expert acrobats and gymnasts. 
They held the audience until the moving picture 
screen was lowered and responded to several cur- 
tain calls. The comedian of the trio could now 
eliminate the bit of comedy which he originated 
where he falls with a table in an attempt to get 
over it. This is being done by so many that it 
has lost its value. Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Kelcy 
present a delightful comedy sketch entitled "A 
Tale of a Turkey," replete with pathos ami humor 
and well acted. Wlllard Newell and company In 
"Last Night" have a rollicking sketch. The situa- 
tions follow In rapid succession, but there Is room 
for more comedy lines. It pleased immensely. 
Tyler and James, colored vocalists, use their so- 
prano and contralto voices to good advantage and 
blend admirably. They have good stage presence. 
George Austin Moore pleased with a number of 
songs, including the "Pixie" pot ponrri. Mildred 
Flora on a slack wire uses the same familiar 
comedy. Tegge and Daniels do a lot of "kidding" 
in their conversation sketch. Some of the Jokes 
are good, singing fair. Chas. I^edegar In comedy 
tope walking act pleased. Others on the bill are: 
Gonzalez Brothers, Sully and Phelps, Hattle Ster- 
ling and Reno and Azora. 

TROCADKRO (I. M. Welngarden. mgr.).— "A 
Girl from China" Is the burlesque offering by the 
stock company. The piece Is patterned after "The 
Geezer" and given a handsome setting, showing 
quarters In Chinatown. While reminiscent of 
Weber and Fields and not quite as funny as the 
previous presentation, It Is devoid of suggestive 
diffusion. Battling Nelson and "The Girl In Blue" 
are retained. In the olio appeared Edwards and 
Glenwood, Robert De Mont Trio and Harry New- 
man. 

FOLLY (J. J. Fennessy, mgr.).— The "Bowery 
Beauties" burlesque company, with Murray J. 
Simons, Louis Dacre, Glorie Eller and the Great 
Carroll, is the offering this week. 

WHITE CITY (Paul D. Hows, mgr.).— In spite 
of the ccld weather crowds continue to visit this 
resort. In the vaudeville theatre the bill con- 
sists of Allen Wlghtman. Mack and Dugal, Peter 
J. Smith, Musical Forrests. Maude Delmar and 
Iiew Wells. Outdoor features In the new plaza by 
Cameron and Eph. Thompson's elephants are Inter- 
esting. Will J. Dicker, coon brass band singer, is 
one of the extra attractions. Kryl and his band 
moved over from Rlvervlew Park, succeeding 
Randa Rossa, and offer a program of populur and 
classical selections. 

SANS SOUCI PARK (Leonard Wolf, mgr.).— 
The vaudeville bill at this park Includes Flo 
Adler, Frank Hall, Walton and Wllllston and Pete 
Baker. The comfortable lienches under shady 
trees are always filled with lovers of good music, 
which Is furnished by the Banda Roma. The side 
attractions are receiving large attendance. 

RIVBRVIBW PARK (Win. M. Johnson, mgr.). 
— The fireworks Spectacle* "Fall of the Golden 
(Sate," is more pretentious than originally intend- 
ed. The production covers an area of ten acres 
and employs ."00 people, including complete city 
fire brigade and equipment. Other new attractions 
secured bv the management are "The Kansas 
Cvclone," '"The Water Nymphs" and the ."Vassar 
Vaudeville Girls." A large circle swing will be 
Installed during the week. 

CHUTES'.- A pony hlpi>odromc has been added 
to the list of amusements. The mermaid act of 
Filter proved a strong feature and puzzles spec- 
tators by her marvellous amphibian practices. In 
the vaudeville theatre are Jessie P.ellgard. Tony 
Reagan, Chas. and Joe Memcyer and moving pic- 
tures. 

BISMARCK GARDEN. The North Shore rendez- 
vous opened for I he summer with Carl Runge 
and his band as the chief attraction. During the 
rammer a series of concerts will be given by other 
bands and orchestras. 

COLISEUM. Mr. and Mrs. Watrous are the 
soloists with Wells band, which has firmly estab- 
lished Itself in favor. The program has l»een ar- 
ranged to please the most fastidious lovers of 
inelodv and business continues good. 

RAVINIA PARK. Walter Damrosch and his 
New York Symphony Orchestra opened the summer 
season at this suburb resort, giving two concerts 
dally. The success of this organization at Rnvlnla 
last season prompted the management to prolong 
the engagement of Mr. Damrosch this year. 

NOTES.— The Trocadero last week played to the 
largest business In the history of that theatre, 
exceeding all previous records. James F. Stevens, 
of the I>» Rrun Grand Opera Trio, was suddenly 
called to Minneapolis by the death of his brother 
In that city, and the "II Trovatore" act at the 
Olympic wa* changed the latter part of the week 
to selections from •'Hie Rohemlnn Girl" by the 



ALT00NA. PA. 

PARK THEATRE, Lakemont <L. T. Shannon, 
mgr.). — Week IS: Bell and Richards, comedy musi- 
cal act, well received; Marie Le Roy, very good; 
Cordownle Sisters in song and dance, pleasing; 
John F. Clark, excellent; The Be-Anos in an acro- 
ltatlc act delighted (he audience. The Le Roys, 
trapeze performers, free attractiou, took well. One 
of the new amusements at the park Is the "shute 

the chute," which will be In operation shortly. 

NOTE. -I. C. Mlshler and wife left on an extended 
trip of the Lakes and M't. Clemens, Mlcb. 

C. G. C. 



ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 

YOUNG'S PIER (II. Myers, mgr.).— Week of 
IS: The KItabauza Tfuup* of Japanese mude a big 
hit with their mixed acrobatic and Juggling act; 
The Astaires, dancing act, good; Doherty's Poodles 
pleased matinee audiences; LeClalre and Hart, 
comedy strong men. strong hit; Two Pucks, sing- 
ing and dancing, fair; Frank Mayne and company, 
"The Sexton's bream." fulr; Peggy Fox, singing, 
fair. STEEPLECHASW PIER (Giles Clements, 
mgr. >. -Marseilles, contortionist, was big hit; Pete 
Shaw, acrobat, good; Adams and White, musical 
act, good; Baby Tweed, singing and roller skating, 
fair; Massey and ('lenience, blackface, good. 
Keene, comedy Juggler, fair; Irene Latour nud her 
dog Zuza for the third week, good; Ed M'ora, Illus- 
trated songs, good. GUVERNATORS THE- 
ATRE (Sid Fern, mgr.).— The Vnnos, handcuff act, 
for the second week scored big; William Robbins 
and Lydia Trenman, singing act, good; Kaufman 
Sisters, acrobats, big hit; The Three McKees, 
change artists, good; Alvora, singing, good; 
Somen ami Lev, conversationalists, fair; The Bar- 
ten, acrobats, good; I-iTotir Sisters, singing and 
dancing, fair; Two Rays, roller skating, food; 
Stanley Probst Trio, singing and dancing, good; 
The Healeys. sketch, fair; Kit K arson, novelty 
shiKitlng,' good, and Bailey and Picket t. acrobats. 
good. 8TEBL PIEJR (J. Bothwell. mgr.).— Mur- 
phy and Gibson's mlmtrels are still doing a gotsl 
business here. S. WAOHTER. 



BALTIMORE, MD. 

ELECTRIC PARK (Schanberger & Irvln. mgrs.). 
—Week 18: Bill o|m>ii» with The Quaker City 
Quartet, excellent; Jacob's Dog Circus, splendid; 
Carnelli and Eddy, comedy Jugglers, entertaining 
and unique; Lillian Le Roy, pleased Immensely; 
Doherty Sisters captured the entire house. The 
open air feature, the Edgetoris, male and female 
trapeze artists, took well. The concerts still con- 
tinue, as well as dancing and other attractions. 
RIVERV1EW PARK this week has the Open- 
ing of the new gondola lake, with a fort In the 
middle of the water. The fort will be Illuminated 
and the gondolas will be etpilppcd with electric 
engines. Work on the Roman Arch Is nearly com- 
pleted and the wiring is In. The Royal Artillery 
Band, Senor Alia, leader, still continues popular. 

G. J. WOLFF. 



BINGHAMTON. N. Y. 

WHITE CITY (William Kendal, mgr.). Week 
1S: The vaudeville bill at this resort Is an unusu- 
ally strong one. with the best acts seen nt the 
resort this season. Hume, Cain and Hoey, the 
harmony singing and comedy trio, who leave 
shortly to fill their European engagements, pre/red 
a surprise to the patrons: the work of Milton and 
Kelser on the triple bars Is unexcelled; McNamee. 
the clay modeller, provoked laughter with his pe- 
culiar characters, and MacNIchols, the champion 
roller skate dancer, and his dog .lip were well re- 
ceived: Elliott and Neff, the comedy singing duo, 
scored a big hit. JOGGERST. 



CINCINNATI, 0. 

ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS (Walter If. Draper. 
Sec'y). — Innes* Band, with the following soloists: 
Herman Bellstedt, cornet; Vaclav Jiskra. string 
Imiss; l\ml Sarll, clarionet, and H. ,T. Williams, 
harp. On Wednesday evening a ragtime concert 
was given which proved oue of the strongest draw- 
ing cards of the season. Each number was given 
In nn artistic manner. A novelty In the way of 
outdoor music was the solo playing of Mr. Jiskra, 
double string bass. Palne's "Last Days of Pom- 
pell" (A. I* Dolson. mgr.). which has been ex- 
hibiting here for the past two weeks, gave a vivid 

reproduction of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. 

CHESTER PARK (I. M. Martin, mgr.). -This 
week's attractions In the vaudeville theatre are: 
Laura Davis, singing comedienne, very good; 
Brothers Gloss, statue posing, very artistic; Sis- 
ters Batcheler, singers, dancers and musicians, big 
hit; Mine. Luba de Sarema and her trained ani- 
mals, who held over for another week; Chester 
Park Oia-ra Company In "The Rounders." Next 

week: "Belle of New York." LAGOON (J. J. 

Weaver, mgr.). — Lionel Legate, equilibrist, re- 
mains another week, giving free outdoor exhibition. 
In the theatre Herbert nnd Willing, singers and 
dancers, made a big hit; Mantell's Marionette 
Hippodrome was Interesting: The Aherns, acrobats, 
did some good head-to head balancing. Mile. 
Marie, fire dancer, and Sanders, Dean ami San- 
ders In a sketch called "A Timely I*»sson" were 

well receive. CONEY ISLAND (Anderson & 

Brooks, mgrs.).- Bryant's Minstrels continue an- 
other week. The performance this week Is much 
smoothers than the first week. Bert Melburn. 
John Cartnell. Billy McKee, George Van and 
D'Arcy Campbell were the hits of the show. 

ii. nEss. 

COLUMBUS, 0. 

0LRNTANOY PARK THEATRE (Will Prosser, 
mgr.). — The Kleins, clever; Lillian Ashley plenses; 
Esfelle Wordette and company took well; the 
Four Dancing Harrises pleased; Do Onzo and Mc- 
Donald are appreciated. UNDER CANVAS. - 

Rlngllng Bros., 1S. INDIANOLA PARK.— 

Burdlow Trio, fair; Put Conway and his band, well 
received. 



Cobb's Corner 



JUNE 23. 1906. 



No. 17. A WMfcly Word With WILL tba Wordwrtght. 

* 

Call and aee me about that SKETCH, 
that ACT, that SONG, that PARODY. 

'Twon't cost you anything to talk it 
over. 

If your "turn" needs a half-sole and 
heel, or a patch, bring it to 

■ 

WILL D. COBB 

WORDWRIOHT 
Theatrical Exchange Bid*;., 

1481 BROADWAY, 

NEW TORS CITY 



DALLAS. TEX. 

LAKM CLIFF (F. II. Parry, mgr.).— Week of 
June 17; Zoa Matthews, proved the hit of the bill; 
Tens Julian, revealed a Iteautiful soprano voice 
and made a hit; Daisy Ford, pleasing; Sydney 
Aspland, very pleasing; Lew Newcomh and the 
American Male Quartet proved a success; Warren 
chase, acceptable; Jack Martin, One. E. A. A. 

DES MOINES, IA. 

INOERSOLL PARK (Fred Buchanan, mgr.).— 
Week 17: Clayton White, Marie Stuart and com- 
pany In "Paris"; good; Steely, Doty and Coe. 
musical act, excellent; Koder-Lovell Trio, comedy 
bicyclists, good; Wells and Sells, comedy acrobats; 

Hallan and Hayes. EMPIRE (M. J. Kargor, 

mgr.).— Closed June 17. Will reopen early In 

August. IOWANA PARK (W. R. Uourley, 

mgr.). — Week 17: Royal Opera Company In "Mi- 
kado"; excellent business. UNDBR CANVAS.— 

(Sentry Bros.' Dog ami Pony Show, 8, 9, popular 
and played to capacity business. Rlngllng Bros, 
have their advance paper up. 

II. V. REAVER. 



EAST0N, PA. 

ISLAND PARK (D. E. SeGulne, mgr.).— Week 
IS: Lew Simmons and Tommy Harris, well liked; 
John T. Hanson and Maybel Drew, "The Village 
BUI Poster," caught the audience and received 
liberal applause; Jack Symonds made good with his 
monologue; the Marvellous St. Julian, gymnasium 
expert, presented a very clever and entertaining 
act; Murphy and Andrews, entertainers, gave a 
little of everything and made good; Pierce and 
opp. Genua comedians, went big. IMctures 
closed. MAC. 



ELKHART, IND. 

CRYSTAL THEATRE (Jack Bentham, local 
mgr.). — Week 18: Colburn and Francis, good 10- 
ception; Asbtoii nud Baric, moderately successful; 
Blanche Freeman, Illustrated song, takes well: 

Lewis ami Harr, hit. UNDER CANVAS.— The 

J. Frank Hatch Shows under the auspices of Ihe 
Firemen's Benevolent Protective Association are 

drawing fair steed crowds. Show medium. 

NOTES. The Bucklen Theatre Vaudeville has 
dosed Its doors due to lack of patronage. House 
has been a loser from start. Ill Henry, whose 
troupe Is summering here, has left for his mines In 
Idaho. He states he will return the latter part of 
July to make preparations for next season. 

C. A. B. 



ERIE, PA. 

WALDAMEER (Thos. Maloney. mgr.).— Bill for 
week 18 Included: The Lovetts. acrobats; Lee 
White, singer; Baby Owen and company. 
In a Juvenile sketch; Joe A. Hurdman. comedian, 

ami the Wolf Brothers, acrobats. FOUR MILE 

CREEK (H. T. Foster. Mgr.).— Program com- 
mencing 17 presented: I*a Adelia, dancer; Tom 
Moore, etna song shouter; Rud Farnum Trio, mu- 
sicians; Don and May Oordon, bicyclists, and Will 

Fields,, comedian. NOTE.— Roller skating Is 

very popular at Four Mile Creek. 

L. T. BERLINER. 



EVANSVILLE, INT. 
OAK SUMMIT PARK (Edwin F. C.alllgan. 
mgr.).— Melville and Conway, comedv sketch, Were 
the features of the bill of 17. Their comedy Is 
clean cut and well received. Master Slater was 
fair with his songs; Fannie Frunkel, formerly of 
"The Runaways," was successful with her songs; 
Warren nnd Roekway, comedy musical act, fair; 
Gordon Eldrid failed to please with his monologue. 

Moving pictures closed. COOK'S PARK (Harry 

Laurance. mgr.).— The Two Rocketts are the head- 
liners week of 17. Their comedv sketch, "The 
Steeple on the Hill." was well liked. Andy Rice, 
Hebrew comedian, fair; L. DeArlcn's contortion 
net pleased; Scott and Wilson, comedy, good; 

Oaaee, comedy jugglers, made a hit. THEA- 

TpRIUM (West A Vrenon, mgrs.).— Tills house 
opened 13 with five cent vaudeville, fiood houses 

have been the result of their excellent offering. 

NOTES.— The Elks had a great week. They 
brought the Clnclnnatus Amusement Company's 
"Feasts and Furies" here. This production la a 
winner. Five hundred people are used In It. Ilie 
vaudeville acts are numerous and for the most part 
good. ROBERT L. OP/ELL. 



VARIETY 



IS - 




park. The management baa Installed continuous 
va urn- vllle In place of musical comedy. 

FAIRPLAY. 



FRESNO. CAL. 

NOVELTY (J. Edwin Venlo, mgr.).— Week 11: 
Harry De Lain as "the giddy old maid" was well 
received by a large audience; Geo. F. Keane in 
illustrsted songs opened the show and won ap- 
proval; The Uregons in a singing act were also 
well received, the woman of the team being very 
clever; Bernard Novelty Company closed the show 
with a sketch which kept the audience in a roar 
of laughter. There are two sets of moving pic- 
tures this week. Capacity business. EMPIRE 

(W. A. Hoen, mgr.). — Week 11: Bimbo, comedy 
acrobat, went fair; too mich stalling in this act. 
Misa Cora Hoen sings the illustrated song; she 
went big, being a great favorite here. Hall and 
Lorraine in a sketch. ''The Book Agent," have a 
good act, the man being excellent in his Imitations 
of birds and animals. The Golden West Comedy 
Four, colored performers, scored. Pictures of the 
San Francisco earthquake and Are closed the 
show. Business good. BOB. 



GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

RAMON A (Louis' J. Delamarter, mgr.).— Week 
17: "The Chimney Sweeps," headed by Fanny Ide, 
late of "Tbe Isle of Spice." are the headllners; 
the dancing la a special feature and scored heavily. 
E. W. Eekert and Emma Berg, who are old 
favorites here, have a new operetta called "Mas- 
ter and Pupil," in which they pleased with their 
Hinging. The act concludes with their funny "Cat 
Fight" burlesque on grand opers. Thomas K cough 
and Ruth Francis were seen in the one-act play, 
"The Wsy He Won Her." Mr. Keough makes 
four complete changes and his characters are well 
done. The Imitations of Sam Bernard and John 
Ransone were but fairly done. Herbert and Rog- 
ers, last seen here with A. G. Fields' Minstrels, 
have a fair act. Harry Edeson and his dog Ik>c 
do a musical comedy turn that pleased. The 
Ramonagrapb haa the moving pictures of the 
Olmplan games at Athens, which are very good. 

C. H. HALLMAN. 



ITHACA, N. T. 

REN WICK PARK.— The park opened June 4. 
Week of June 11 made amends for the preceding 
week. Llbby and Trayer proved n drawing curd. 
Garry Owen and mother went strong. Mor.arto. 
musical, fine; The Val Vinos, excellent, and 
Woodward, tambourine expert, very good. June 
19: Show up to the standard. Seeback, good; 
Polk and Polk, good; Frank Burt, fair; Burkhardt 
and Berry, very good; Youngs and Brooks, fine. 

NOTES. — A. J. Stastney, pianist, on account 

of Inflammatory rheumatism was forced to retire 
temporarily from Renwlck Park. Prof. Becker 
has replaced him. Tbe Tompkins House is the 
theatrical resort here. J. B. HERSON. 



JAMESTOWN, N. Y. 

CELORON (J. J. Waters, mgr.).— A fine bill 
was presented week 18. The Six Gllnserettls did 
some good acrobatic work; Dan Quinlau and Kel- 
ler Mark had a rapld-flre talk named "Traveling 
Dentist"; Amerlcus Comedy Four, songs and com- 
edy; Henry and Francis in "The Janitor," and Ida 
O'Day, musician and singer. Attendance good. 

L. T. BERLINER. 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 

FOREST PARK (Lloyd Brown, mgr.) .— Rosat- 
tl's Royal Italian Bund played a return engage- 
ment week 17 to good business. Nellie Turn wall, 
soprano, pleased. At Hopkins Theatre Macart's 
monkeys were the headllner, scoring big hit with 
children especially. Avon Comedy Four, Dixon 
Brothers, the Vivians and Hader Brothers com- 
pleted bill. The Johnstown Flood still continues 
to be a liberally patronized concession. -ELEC- 
TRIC PARK (Sam Benjamin, mgr.). Week 17: 
Excellent business with Kllery'a Band as chief at- 
traction. Open-air act, Harry DuBcll. bicycle 
rider. In the German Village Connelly, Neff and 
Connelly, eccentric dancing and singing, I/oekhart 
Sisters gave a clever turn, making several changes. 
Guy Woodward sang. Alsace and Lorraine play on 
all sorts of musical instruments. Tin- Mystic 
nmtca and the Alligator Farm continue to Is? very 

is.pular concessions. FAIRMOUNT PABK (Ben 

Rosenthal, mgr.). — Business still big at this pretty 



LEAVENWORTH, KAN. 

PKopi.F/s (('has. Cunningham, mgr.). Week 
17: «'<K.k and Oaks, good sketch, pleases; the 
Great Itousell, clever ring and trapeze act; Dcl-A- 
Phone, mimic, does excellent; the Mozarts, slap 
shoe artists, much applause and well deserve It; 
C. E. llasleti, Illustrated songs, continues to make 
good and is well liked here; Peoplescope. 

LBB J. LOGAN. 



L00AN8P0RT, IND. 

CRYSTAL (Tom Hardlc, mgr.).— BUI thla week 
gives satisfaction. Howard Dot son, clay modeling, 
clever; Berrlan and Mackln, singers and daucera, 
good; Phil Conner, Illustrated songs, pleased; Cay- 
lor and Jefferson In "A Woman's Way" fair: 
KInodrome. DOWLING (J. E. Dowllng, mgr.). 



Minle Bentley, foot Juggler, very good; Hope 
and Thels, sister act, ordinary; Harry Jones, 
illustrated songs, poor; Chas. Heclow, comedian, 
made good; Sunetaros, Japanese wonders, good; 
moving pictures. REVILO. 

LOUISVILLE. XY. 

FONTAINE FERRY PARK (Wm. Relchniann, 
mgr. ).- -Week of 17: The Rossow Midgets are the 
headllners on tbe bill. They do some very fast 
ucrolmtlc work and close with a comedy boxlug 
Iniiii. The Bowery Boys' Quartet do some singing 
mid dancing which Is fair. Katherlne Oahl sang 
some fair songs. Charlie Rossow, the midget, In 
impersonations of great bandmasters, was good. 
Bailey and Austin, "Tbe American Beauties," are 
not billed as the headllners, but should be. Their 
burlesque work was funny and they scored a hit. 

NOTE.— Erllnger's Band is still furnishing the 

music for the free concert. Beatrice Fischer, the 
soloist. Is fast making herself a prime favorite 
here. CHARLES SYLVESTER. 



BAL 



PROFESSIONAL 

TRUNKS 



MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

NEW CRYSTAL THEATRE (F. B. Winter, 
mgr.). — Week 11: Nell Moran, Dan Baker and 
company (late of "Tbe College Widow" company) 
as headllners in new playlet, "Tbe Man and the 
Boy," in three scenes. Introducing novel effects 
with tbe aid of moving pictures. This Is the 
Moran-Baker company's first appearance as vaude- 
vlllians and they scored a hit. Ernie and Hen- 
neger have a unique act. Both men are inono- 
pedes. Cameron and Flanagan, singing, talking 
and dancing, caught tbe audience. Conkey, Jug- 
gler and monologlst, clever. Coming 18: Adonis 
Fayblo. contortionist; Herald Square Comedy 

Four, Sisters De Veau. WONDERLAND PARK 

(J. Whaling, mgr.).— Business rules good despite 
the zero weather which prevails. Bill week 17 
(■pedal): Kann War Airship. 

J. C. RCS1ION. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Gentry Bros.' shows are holding forth to good 
business. In addition to the animal acts they have 
a troupe of Japs and the Lorettn Twins Trio, the 
latter a kid bar act which appeared with success 
at the Orpheum last season. Hagenlieck Shows 
come July 2 and RiugUng Shows July 0. The town 
is billed to a finish In consequence. Rlngllng 
Shows are at La Crosse July 4, Red Wing B and 
St. Paul 7. Forepaugh -Sells Shows are at Winona 
July 4. Hale's Fire Fighters play Winona June 
20. Wonderland continues to get good business 
from both St. Paul and Minneapolis. The Four 
Alvanos and I>an Lamont's animal circus are the 
free acts, while the Johnstown Flood continues. 
Fp at Wild wood, north of St. Paul, the B. E. 
Gregory "Fighting the Flames" has been under 
water for two weeks on account of the breaking 
of n White Bear Lake dyke. The show will prob- 
ably open Sunday. 24. The regular band concert 
season at the Lake Harriet Pavilion Roof o|M>ns 
24 with the Oberhofer Orchestral Band. Concerts 
will be given every evening and on Sunday after- 
noons until July 29. when Llberattl and his band 
come In for four weeks of two a day. The annual 
encampment of the G. A. R. will be held here 
week of August 12 and local showmen are acting 
accordingly. CHAPIN. 

MONTREAL, CAN. 
.RIVERSIDE PARK (Al E. Read, mgr.).— Week 
17 opened to bad weather. Zimmerman's band con- 
certs contnue strong. The Millman Trio are a 
feature; have an excellent act. Youno, a Juggler 
and balancer on the Jap style, has a good uct with 
exceptionally pretty settings. The Four Fausts, 
acrobats, gave good act. Kosonsa, Illusionist, hi 
good. Clark's dogs and ponies next week. DO- 
MINION PARK. -Week 17: The concert by the 
Vander Meerschen band took well. Herman Wee- 
don's lions are the feature act. The Foresters 

held a three days festival here this week. SOU- 

MKR PARK (Lavlgne & I>aJoIe, mgrs.). IS opened 
new bill. Lavigno's band concerts are popular. 
The Manello and Mamitz troupe of acrobats are 
the feature act. Well liked. Herbert's dogs, tine; 
Skatlnella, good; llcngler Sisters, clever; Louis 
Cvr and pecarle, strong men. give a remarkable 
exhibition. AL M. PRKNTISX. 



NEWARK. N. J. 

PROCTOR'S (R. C. Stewart, mgr.). Week 18: 
The bill this week was well received and Includes 
a few newcomers at this house. The Laskcy Rolfe 
Quintet, Cotn p oo e d of four cellos and a bass viol, 
render pleasing selections; The Three Dumotids, 
Parisian street singers have been heard here before 
and with their singing and violin playing repeat 
their former success; Winona Winters, a daughter 
of Banks Winters, an old-time minstrel, gave Imi- 
tations, lielng especially good in her ventrlloqulal 



They're made of fibre. Your money back if 
trunk don't suit you. Can you heat itl 
Send for Catalogue V. 

WILLIAM BAL (Inc.). HO W. 40th Street 



numbers; The Maaeea do a novelty Juggling act; 
The Boldens, colored song and dance team, went 
as well as the majority of performera In their 
line; Mtusnn and Mertou won't let you go to 
sleep, but they should dig up some new "cou"; 
May Yokes and company in a new sketch lalsdled 
"A Model Maid" carried off the honors. As an 
eccentric comedienne Miss Yokes is one of the best 
that has apiieared at this house In some time. 
The support was capable. Motion pictures were 
good. OLYMPIC PARK (Hans Weaver, mgr.)— 
Week 18: "Boccaccio" was the offering of the 
Mm. in Opera Company this week, with Edith Brad- 
ford, Laura Moore, Carrie Godfrey and Jack 
O'Nell, all newcomers. The performance was 

-ELECTRIC 



quite tbe best so far this seasou. 
PARK (C. A. Dunlap, mgr.).— Week 18: A good 
show at tbe Rustic Theatre. Those here are: 
Rlchy Craig, with his novelty phonograph con- 
versation act; Christy and Willis as the tramp 
and soubrette, good; Sam Soda, sang; Wentwortb 
and Vesta with a dog were good and tbe Three 
Madcaps, young women who do an acrobatic turn, 
work bard and go great. They probably will re- 
main over another week. HILLSIDE PARK 

(Wm. Thaller, mgr.).— Week 18: Olive Swsn, 
Bob Mason, Sam Scovel; Mamie Fisher, tbe "Slide 
for Life Qlrl"; Nebraska Bill, with tbe rest of tbe 
cow boys and girls; Prof. Archie Urlffen, the bal- 
loonlst. Tbe ballroom, roller-bolK»r and vaudeville 
show are all still attracting the crowds to this 
park. NOTES.— William Whittle, the ventrilo- 
quist who played Electric Park last week, had a 
narrow escape from death In a trolley accident 
while returning home after tbe evening perform- 
ance last Friday. The car was crowded with peo- 
ple returning from tbe park and was struck by a 
runaway aand car on a grade. Mr. Whittle was 
accompanied by his wife. Fred Stanton, tbe come- 
dian of this city, has been engaged to play the 
part of the football coach In "Tbe College Widow" 
for next season. He formerly did monologue. 
Mattle Blake, tbe "show girl," will form a part- 
nership in the near future and enter vaudeville. 
She will write all her own songs. A special drop 
will be carried. Andrew and James, contortion- 
ists, are rehearsing a new novelty act for next 
season. It will be called "Lather Go; or, A Close 
Shave." JOE O'BRYAN. 






NEW BRIGHTON, PA. 

John and Mamie Couroy, singing and dancing, 
fair; Nellie Nice, singing, fair; Bartlett and Col- 
lins, comedy sketch, good; John P. Rodgers, sing- 
er, good voice; DeYau and DeVau, musical act, 
the best seen here. WM. LYTTLE. 



NEW BRIGHTON, PA. 

JUNCTION PARK (S. Hanauer, mgr.). The 
bill for week of 18, better than one of last week, 
includes: Johnny and Mamie Conroy, who made 
quite a bit; Nellie Nice, singing, fair; Bartlett 
and Collins, fair; John P. Rodgers, good, and De 
Yeaux and l»e Veaux, poor. C. V. D. 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
WEST F.ND PARK (Thos. S'. Winston, mgr.).— 
Week 17: Anna Franklyn, excellent; Gllllhaii 
and Perry have some talk that reeks of the melo- 
drama* l^i vine and licouard and the Fredericks 
Family completed the bill. Fischer's Baud re- 
ceived unstinted applause. Business is excellent. 
Hill 24 contains The Rosalres, Reckless Reklaw, 
Cilllihau and Perry and Anna Franklyn. 

O. M. SAM I t M. S. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

KEITH'S (II. T. Jordan, mgr.).— Virginia Earl 
and her Six Johnnies scored aa the chief offering 
on this week's tjlll. With the "girl act" lumber 
being worked to a point of suffering, the "boy 
uct" given by Miss Earl and her sextet of young 
men was a pleasure. A Seymour Brown has re- 
placed L. R. Berry. For tbe first fine during 
his several visits here Harry Davenport met with 
n complete front by trying out something which he 
lalieled "Some English Types." It consisted of a 
"burglar song," which was meant for a satire, and 
another about "styles of girls not to mnrry." 
Both were equally bad. Once was enough, how- 
ever, and his old act was substituted after the first 
performance, and went as well as ever. The Or- 
pheus Comedy Four also proved dlsappontlng. 
Heretofore this quartet has met with much ap- 
proval here, but on this trip their singing was 
far below tbe average and the Introduction of a 
tableaux with a song about home and mother, 
aided in the downfall. Tony Wilson, Helolse and 
the Amoros Sisters were put on as one act. Their 
offering consists of a melange of Juggling, danc- 
ing, singing and horizontal bar and trapeze work. 
Each In turn won its share of the honors. 'Un- 
set was divided into two numbers later and con- 
tinued to please. The three women are sisters, all 
clever and look well, while Wilson does good 
work on the bars for so heavy a man. Argyro 
Kastron, a violinist e, made her first appearance 
here. She pleased. Mr. and Mrs. Perkins Fisher 
rejieated their "Half Way House" and It was 
well received. James A. Kleruan, of "Florodora" 
fame, introduced "The Taming of the Beast." 
'Hie sketch is written on much broader lines than 
are generally acceptable In this house and the 
blue pencil cut quite a figure after the first per- 
formance. There are no redeeming features about 
the act or the work of the people In It, although 
Stella Beardsley looked very pretty. The Three 
Seldoins. In artistic statuary poses were good, as 
were Lillian Mills and BlldS Morris, two of Ned 
Wayburn's Minstrel Misses, who gave an abbre- 
viated "first part"; Harry Evans, the boy vocalist; 
INI Estus, equilibrist; Miles and Rlckards, who 
sang well and had some poor comedy, and George 
Neville and company, who up on "A Gold Deal" af- 
ter the pictures, made up the list. Business, 
which might Is' considered good considering the 
time of season, continued at the three houses 
which offer a summer season Of stock burlesque. 
The company at the Trocadero is billed as "The 
High School Girls." probably in honor of ihe 
sweet girl graduates who are having their annual 
Innings. The vaudeville bill In connection Is fair. 
The Bijou Stock entertained well-filled braises, with 
Edna Davenport and others adding specialties. 
Ix>ttle Gilson was an added feature of the week's 
entertainment at the Lyceum. KINKS. 



SKETCHES 



WRITTEN TO Q«DMt 

ANY STYLE FOR 
ANYBODY 



SONGS Ud PARODIES 

HARRY DILLON 

Rotm (33, Knickerbocker Ttatrc BM£ 



PITTSBURG, PA. 

THE GRAND (Harry Davis, mgr.).— An excel- 
lent bill is pleasing big audiences. Clsude Oil* 
liugwaler and bis comedy company present "A 
Strenuous Proposal." Mr. Gllllngwater plays dual 
roles and his drunken vulgar suitor shows a 
power of character study that entitled the actor 
to tbe praise that has preceded his first appear- 
ance here. He was ably assisted by Carlyn Stre- 
llts and Edith Hinkle. The Eight Allisons re- 
peated their former triumphs. Enjoyable comedy 
and music Is given by Stanley and Wilson. Tbe 
young woman has an excellent soprano voice, while 
the man Is a clever German comedian. John and 
Bertha Gleason, assisted by Fred Houlihan, have 
a splendid dancing and musical turn. Ben Welch 
caught a whirl of applause on bis entrance and 
kept everyone In a fine humor with bla Hebrew 
witticisms and parodies. Smlrl and Kesaner with 
graceful dancing and good acrobatic work went 
well; Diamond and Smith, good; Garry Owen and 
company, in varied entertainment; Clark's Dogs 
andl Ponies; Nlblo and Riley, eccentric dancers; 
Brazil and Brazil, Brown and DeLores round out 
the bill.. Tbe memlMTS of Harry Davis stock 
company arrived here Monday and immediately 
hegan rehearsals of Cecil Raleigh's one-set drama, 
"Tbe Spy." Marlon Ballon. Charles Abbe, Minna 
I'liiiiips. George Probert and Alice Oale are the 
leading members, while Oscar Eagle, of the Llebler 

forces, Is the managing director. PARK8. — The 

Kilties Band entered upon a two weeka engage- 
ment at Luna Park this week and with tbe high 
diving Norlns comprise the free attractions. Two 
new permanent attractions opened their doors at 
Luna during tbe past week, Aza, "tbe electrical 
girl," and the Hindoo illusion, "The Flying Wom- 
an." At Dream City Manager Cunningham pre- 
sents Dlavolo and his loop act. Holcombe's Band 
has been re-engaged, the Klmara Japanese Troupe 
will remain, and on Wednesday evening another 
fireworks display was given. At West View Park 
the Grand Army Band of Allegheny give concerts 
and the Butler Brothers present their "Dare Devil 
1 4-n p for Life." Many picnics will be held here. 
At Kenny wood Park the Herald Square Opera 
Company present a musical mlx-up, "A Trip to 
India." Mayer's Band gives dally concerts. At 
Calhoun the Pan-American Minstrels bold forth. 
Oak wood has Dunn ha nit's Second Brigade Band, 
assisted by Edwin Kelly, whistler, and Cliff Far- 
rell. monologlst. At Southern Park Nlrella's pop- 
ular Fourteenth Regiment Band heads an enter- 
taining bill. MADAMR PITT. 

PUEBLO, COL. 

EARL (O. M*. Morris, mgr.). Week IS: Bry- 
ilon's IK>g Circus, Four Cycling McDonalds, Stod- 
dard and WUson; Peck and Peck, comedy singing 
sketch; Oscar Walsh and others. Good attend- 
ance week of 11. LAKE MINNEQCA PARK 

(Joe Glass, mgr. I . -Week of 18: G a gnon- Pollock 
stock company In '"Ihe Gambler and the Lady." 
Liherattl'a Band, 22 lo 23. Very heavy attend- 
ance week of 11. E. D. SCOTT. 



SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 

BON TON (J. II. Young, mgr.).— Week 11: La 
Mar, the eccentric monologlst; Henry Fink, He- 
brew specialty, good bit. The White Lo Lo !n 
magic. Illustrated song, moving pictures and the 
two charming little girls. Inez and Odey, In song 
ami dance. Fair patronage.- — NEW GRAND (R. 
J. Klddell, mgr.). 14*19: A good company In 
"Sunnv Africa," with San Francisco disaster pic- 
tures. - ORPIIEFM (P. G. MaeLean, mgr.).— 
Orpheum Stock Company In "Old Heidelberg" 
filled the house all week. -CASINO PARK (Wm. 
Gulney. mgr.). Week 11: Zlnn's Travesty Com- 
pany In "Morocco" was popular. This Is one of 
the moM| frequented shows In the city. — LYRIC 
(Wm, Gulney, mgr.). Week 10: Blttner company 
In "Northern Lights." Good companv and busi- 
ness. JAY E. JOHNSON. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 
CIHH'F.S (John Mnrrlsejr, res. mgr.). Week 
June II: Knrno's London Comedy Company, Frank 
and But, Probst, Kelley and Viohlte, Argenantl 

Trio. Foster and Foster and the Francellas. 

WIGWAM (Sam Harris, mgr.). 'Mils tent theatre 
opened Monday evening vslth packed house and a 
fine show with tie except Ion of Ihe opening act. 
which was ptotupt 1) closed. The audience was one 
of the roogbest crowds seen In a theatre In a long 
time ami evidently did not attend the opening with 
anv desire to Witness the performance, but simply 
to have a goinl time, which consisted principally 
of hooting and yelling at the artists on the stage. 
Rach act was received with Jeers, ami such acta as 
T. Nelson I low us', Joseph Calahan's and Musical 
Bent leys' were simply wasted on an audience of 
this kind. The hill included T. Nelson Downs. 
Joseph Calahan, Musical Bentleys. Jones Sisters, 
Leeds and Leeds, Jean Hathaway and pictures. 

B. D. C. 

































16 



VARIETY 



WANTED 

FIRST-CLASS 

Stock Rep. Co. 

ON PERCENTAGE 



In High-Class Park 
Theatre Opening 



July&d 



for several 

weeks. 



FRANK MELVILLE 



1402 Broadway 



NEW YORK CITY 



CELEBRATE THE FOURTH WITH FIREWORKS 

ASSORTED LAWN DISPLAYS AT 

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Shipped toy Bxpraaa to Any Part Of the* United States 

Sindfmr Catmtoj 

B. E. GREGORY 

167 Dearborn Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 



Musical Conductors 

May l*> addressed care VARIKTY. 



MAX FICHANDLER 

DISENGAGED. 



RICHARD KIESERLING, JR. 

disengaged. 

AL. ELLIS 

WITH HENRIETTA CROSMAN. 



Subscribe now 



sod be sure of 



LEOPOLD FUENKENSTEIN 

144 E. ,_8€|TH ST. NEW YORK CITY. 

CHAS. E. HART 

270 W. 39TH ST., NEW YORK CITY. 

FRED R. HOFF 

"BUSTKR BROWN" CO. 



HUGO O. MARKS 

"THE ROLLICKING GIRL" CO. 

K. WEIXELBAUM 

"LITTLE JACK HORNER" CO. 



VARIETY 



audiences and is a good attraction. NOTE, — 

The new Colonial Amusement Hall at Put-In-Bay 
Island wan opened to tbe public Sunday, Jane 17. 
It Is under the management of T. B. Alexander, 
u well-known theatrical man. 



8HAM0KIN, PA. 

EDGE WOOD PARK (Joseph West, mgr.).— Bill 
18: The Brownings, comedy act, pleasing; Viola 
Dubai, vocalist, good; Miller and Hunter, come- 
dian, ordinary; Robin, comedy juggler, good; Deely 
and Austin, singing and dancing, fair. Coming 
week 25: Mile, and Delome, Degraff Sisters, Terry 
and Elmer, Billy Barlow, Hanley and Flynn. 

MILLER. 



RACINE, WIS. 

BIJOU <.Wui. C. Trlda. local mgr.) —Bill for 
week 14: Hungarian orchestra in high class musi- 
cal selections, pleased; BUI Sheridan, comedian, 
fair; Barry and Patrick, comedy sketch, good; El- 
dorado Trio do a fairly good singing act accom- 
panied by their own music; Fannie Hatfield and 
company, the dancing statues, tbe hit of the bill, 
took several bows each show; Marshal and Ewlng, 
comedy sketch, well liked; Chlsley and company, 
dramatic sketch, a very good dramatic act, some- 
thing oat of the ordinary and pleased; Swain and 
Powers, singers and dancers, very good; Loveland 
Family, musical act, know how to handle very 
difficult music. Closing with two sets moving 
pictures. Good business. 

WM. J. McILRATH. 



ST. PAUL, MINN. 

WONDERLAND.— Splendid performances and 
good business. Johnstown Flood big attraction. 
Special features: The Four Alvlnos, fine exhibition 
of gymnastic feats; Dan Lamont's Animal Show 
and Helntseman's Military Band. WILDWOOD. 

-Hooligan's Slide and figure eight are doing the 
business. Future dates: Gentry Brothers' Dog 
and Pony Show week of 25; Uagenbeck'a Greater 
Show . July 3; Ringling Brothers, July 7. 

B. T. ROBERTSON. 



TOLEDO, 0. 






SANDUSKY, 0. 

CEDAR POINT (George A. Bocckllng, mgr.; 
Col. R. J. Dlegle. mgr. theatre ).--Lljszle Weller, 
a clever little trick planlste, is the headllner here 
1 hi- week; Cook and Stevens, colored, are good; 
lierger Brothers, comedy acrobata and equilibrists, 
have fair act; W. H. Mack and Ma H. Elliott in 
•The New Minister" have a clever sketch, Mor- 
ris and Shayne have charge of the hooking this 
season.— HISTORIC JOHNSON'S ISLAND (0»pt. 
('. L. Goodslte, mgr.).— The moving picture show, 
The San Francisco. Earthquake, under the manage- 
ment of Miss Jessamine Wood*, still attracts large 



CRYSTAL (Geo. W. Lawrie, mgr.).— Week of 
18 an exceedingly good program includes Archer 
and Cartelle, two clever women in Dutch songs and 
dances. The Three Trlllers, rag builders, are well 
up to the standard. Will C. Baker is a pleasing 
singer, while Eddie C. Hays is exceptionally good 
in monologue and has some really funny songs. 
Stephen and Ahpel, two very fine sketch artists, 
and the Kinodrome, with "the invisible man," 
complete tbe bill. Attendance has been good since 

the opening of this house last month. THE 

FARM (Joe Pearlstein, mgr.).— May 18: Good 
hill, big house. The acts are Melnotte La Lola 
Trio, comedy act on wire, good; the Schubert Quar- 
tet, fulr; Willie Dock ray is a favorite in blackface 
monologue; the Harts, singers and dancers; Flor- 
ence Reeves la a really clever violinist; J. H. 
Hutchinson and company make all they can of a 
mediocre sketch termed "Tbe Yule Suiasher." 

Moving pictures close the show. NOTES. — 

Manager Lambkin announces that the Arcade will 
not reopen before September, as extensive altera- 



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CLIFFORD 



Playwright 



Emmet Corrigan, Robert Downing, Dorothy Morton, Walter Per- 
kins, Callahan ft Hack; Jack Wilson, Etc. 

Latest Successes it* Vaudeville « 

CHARLOTTE PARRY In "The Comstock Mystery** 
ROLAND WEST in "The Criminal** 

Address, Care VARIETY 



WANTED 



FIRST-CLASS COMEDY TUMBLER. 



HERMAN BUSH 

OF BUSH A GORDON, 60 EAST 118TH ST., NEW YORK CITY. 

Look at this Combined Machine 

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lions sre contemplated. J. C. Morris, of Luna 
I'ark, Pittsburg, was here this week and has uiude 
arrangements to put in an attraction at Walbrldge 
I'ark. which is to be ready by July 4. 

SYDNEY WIRE. 



TORONTO, ONT. 
SUNNYSIDE GARDEN THEATRE (E. Brooker, 
mgr.).— Jack Franklin with his fine Illustrated 
songs was held over week of 18. Miller and Ed- 
wards, singing duo; Brown and Cobay in a sketch; 
Roberts and Wright, picture song act. and new 
moving pictures shown by Prof. Green. Good at- 
tendance. HANLON'S POINT (L. Solmon, 

mgr.). — Will H. Beasley, the wonder, was the 
headliner week of 18 and took well. Others were 
Leon Adeline and Rice, jugglers; Helen Trenvllle, 
lyric soprano; John T. Kelly, mimic and come- 
dian. A special, attraction was Seymour's Comedy 
Dogs. Big crowds at this popular resort during 
the week. HARTLEY. 



TRENTON, N. J. 

LAKE SIDE THEATRE, Spring Lake Park.— 
Tbe bill week of 18 is one of the best so far this 
season; it is the first week under the new agents. 
Carl Boehmer, magician, led the bill and did some 
clever stunts. Quigg and Mack, eccentric come- 
dians, were good. Tbe Great Richards, female 
impersonator, is clever; bis dancing was graceful. 
Sterling Trio was compelled to respond to encores. 
Topack and West did a comedy sketch, very clever. 
Mile. Danna, serpentine and fire dancer, another 
"Paplnta," very good. The slide effects were 
beautiful. Electric Theatre has for its attraction 
"Since Father Went to Work/' H. B. H. 



WORCESTER, MARS. 

LINCOLN PARK (San ford Wallln, mgr.).— 
Week 18 includes: The La Vails In a trapeze act; 
Charles Kenna, monologist; Mudge and Morton In 
a musical act; Donovan and Arnold, rapid fire art- 
ists, and the Baker Troupe of cyclists. All are 

doing very well. riNEHURST PARK (J. F. 

Donovan, mgr.). — Massey and Cramer in a musical 
net ojtened the show and pleased; Waldo Whipple, 
blackface comedian, was good; McLain Sisters in 
Hinging and dancing act did well; Cook and Hall 
have a good musical act; Ma June in singing act 
was entertaining and Morrison and Berwick closed 

the bill with a fair song and dance act. 

WHITE CITY (II. H. Blgelow, mgr.).— Lee W. 
Schnyler, high diver, and Bending Bonda, a con- 
tortionist, are the free attractions this week and 

both are making good.- NOTES. The female 

member of the Baker Troupe of cyclists slipped 
and fell on tbe wet stage at Lincoln Park Inst 
Monday, sustaining slight Injuries; she continued 
her act under painful difficulties. The Galveston 



Songs That Win on Their Merits 



f 

a 



M 
j 



Professional 
Department 



HARRY JONES 
THOS. KELLY 
JOE McNATTI 



o 

o 



H 

Ef 

o 



FRANCIS, DAY ft HUNTER 

15 WEST 30th STREET, NEW YORK 



Flood has been added to tho many attractions at 
the White City. HARLOW L. STEELE. 



YORE, PA. 

HIGHLAND PARK.— The Highland Park Stock 
Company opened Its season week of 18 with "Tbe 
Charity Ball" and "The Three Guardsmen" to 
capacity business. Between the acts Pearl Lytell, 
Wilbur Mack and George P. Randall go big. Tbe 
roster of the company Is as follows: N. Appel, 
manager; Roger Baker, Edmund Abhy, Wm. J. 
Townsend, Chas. Price, Geo. Randall, Wilbur 
Mack. Wayne Darby, Wm. Nelson, Ernest Bean, 
Louis Lytton, Josephine Price, Pearl Lytell, Irene 
Gordon, Marlon Sherwood and Helen Grayce; also 
Bill Stouffer. "props." JACK DIAMOND. 



VARIETY 



17 



VAUDEVILLE AGENTS 



WILLIA 



ORRIS 



1440 BROADWAY, Corner 40th St., NEW YORK 

Telephone 053. 054. 955 Bryant. Cable Addreee. Wlllmerrlo. 

CHICAGO OFFICE : 167 Dearborn Street 

SPECIAL ATTENTION WI LL BE GIVEN TO SUM MER PARKS AND FAIRS 

N. B. It l« Important that artiste tend their open time to 
both the New York and Ghlcag-o Offices 



Tel. MI7 Bryant. Cable. "Control," Vow York. 

The Agents' Agency 

CLIFFORD C. FISCHER 

1440 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 
HOLLAND BUILDING. 



B. BUTLER BOY LB. 



MATH I AS B. TUFTS. 



THE BOYLE AGENCY 

INTERNATIONAL 
VAUDEVILLE AND DRAMATIC 

SI West Slit Street, NEW YORK. 

Cmble Address. "Butleboyl." New York. 
Tel. 4075. Md. Sq. 

IDA CARLE 



Vaudeville Agent, 



St. James Bonding . 



Tel. BOM Madison. 






ln$ersoll& Hopkins Co. 

lift BROADWAY, M. Y. CITY. 

Amusement Park Agents 



BORNHAUPT EBB 1 *™"" 

St James Bldg. Tel. «6M lfad. So.., New York 



CHAS. ESGHERT 

with Al Sutherland, St James BnUdlmg. 
Booking only good acta. 



Anything There's a Dollar In 

JAGK bBVY 

140 West 42d St. New York 



H. B. MAR1NELLI 



NIW YORK 



PARIS 



LONDON 



Tel. 1187-1188 Madison. 



Cable, Myeraba. 



MYERS-KELLER 

General Vaudeville Agents 

31 West 31st Street, New York 

•Phone, 2032 Madiaon 

REICH, 

PLUNKETT 
* WESLEY 

ST. JAMES BUILDING 

Alex. Steiner 

VAUDEVILLE ABEMT 

Boakdmt Forties <mk Native Acts. 

ST. IAMB 



Cable. Cable, Cable, 

"Helferslch" "Uptodate Pari*" "Bravissimo— London' 

HOLLAND BUILDING, 1440 BROADWAY. 
TELEPHONE: 8084 BRYANT. 



FRANK MELVILLE 

KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING 

SUMMER AMUSEMENTS SS 

CONSTRUCTION AND THEATRICAL 
ATTRACTIONS 



Pitrot&Girard 

IntemationaJ Vaoderille Agents 
1205 Broadway, Maw York 

TnL. 4S1S 



W.J.PIimmer 

Excluaive booking agent for all attractions play* 
ing the Empire Cirouit. Address Knickerbocker 
Theatre Building Annex, Rooms 780 to 787. 




niETY 



KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDINO, NEW YORK CITY 

CARDS OF ARTISTS 

UNDER THB HEADING OP 

"REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS" 



1 -2 Inoh elngle oolumn, 

1 Ineh " 

1-2 Ineh double eelumn, • 

1 Ineh 



AT FOLLOWINQ RATES: 



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• B2.00 monthly, Nat 
4 00 M ■ 

. 4.00 ■ 

7.S0 ■ ■ 



PASTOR'S 

14TH ST., 3D AVE. CONTINUOUS. 20 A 30 CTB. 

NEXT WKRK, MONDAY, JI'NK SB, MDS, 

ELMER TENLEY, 

Re-engagement —Second week of 

PRINCESS PAULINE. 

JOE AND NELLIE DONAR 

Arthur Don and Minnie May Thompson. 

Walter Schrode and Lixale Mulvey. 

Belle Hathaway's IVi •forming Monkey* and 

Mm Ihmhih. 
Gray and Graham. Nagel and Adams. 

Daly and Reno. F. Daly BurgeHS and 

Tony and Flo Vernon. Dog Pinnegan. 

Patchen and Clifton. The Multlmarvelgraph 

Max Bitter. and the American Vltagraph. 




6REATER N. Y. CIRCUIT 




TIEATRE 

or 

VARIETIES 



VHAMMERSTEIN'S 
ICTORIA 

Next Week ^gnSBm JUNE 25 

Prices. Mo. We, 7(c A tl 00. Mat. Every Day. Me k 60c 

FIRST APPEARANCE IN AMERICA. 

THE HUMAN SKYSCRAPER, 

MACHNOW 

THE INDESCRIBABLE RUSSIAN GIANT. 

Actual Helghth. feet 2% Inches. 
Positively the Tallest Man Ever in Existenoe. 

6— MUSICAL OUTTYS— 0. 
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LALLA SELBINI 

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BE RZ AC'S COMEDY OIBCUS. 
RUB AND PRBVOST. 

TOM IIEAKN. 

COLLINS AND HART. 

FWRREROS AND HIS WONDERFUL DOG. 

OAMILLE TRIO. 

SHARP BROTH BRS. 




ALVIENE'S 



Vaudeville School of acting 

AMD 

listititi of Stage Daooiig 



Grend Opera Houee Building 

23rd Bf. and Eighth Ave. 

New York City 



Largest and moat enoeneafnl 
school of the kind in Bow York- 
New acts rehearsed and whipped Into shape. 
Vaudeville acta, dances, sketches, ate., taught. 
1,000 successful pupils now on the stage, 
for Illustrated booklet. 




New 
Richmond 

Hotel 



(EUROPEAN PLAN.) 
EU80NS THEATRE, northeast corner Clark and Klnsle streets. 



OHICAGO, III. 



A. J. FLYNN, Prop. 



Everything new. Running wster, stesm heat, telephones in all 
rooms; elevator service. Light breakfast served In rooms free of 
charge. Make my hotel your home when In Chicago. 



SHOES 



FOR STAGS, EVENING AND STREET WEAR. SOLE AND "EXCLU- 
SIVE OWNER OF BERNSTEIN SHORT VAMP AND STAGE LAST. 

Everything in footwear pertaining to theatrical productions. 

WILLIAM BERNSTEIN, 
Ttd. r>68 Mad. 509 Sixth Avenue, near 31st Street, New York. 

WESTERN DRAMATIC AGENCY 

Managers wanting reliable people In all branches of the theatrical profession, write. Office open from 
10 to 10. Desk room for Manager*. 127 LA SALLE ST., NEAR MADISON, CHICAGO, ILL. 

(Experienced chorus girls furnished.) P. J. RIDGE, Booking Agent. 

LONDON -MUSIC HALL" 

G7>e Great English Vaudeville Taper (WfKJy) 

401 STRAND. Vi . C. 

American Representative — Mite Ids M. Carle, Room 706, St. Tames Building, where a 
file of s sp sffi can be seem end advertisements will he received 

AMERICANS COMING TO LONDON SHOULD ADVERTISE IN THY 

Theatrical s Sports Review 

The offloe will always welcome Americans. 

0ATLEY A CRAWLEY, Proprietors. BERT A. DORMAN, Editor. 

Offices, 61 Green Street, Leioester Square, London. Eng. 



Amusement Booking Association <«•■> 



JOHN F. McGRAIL, President and General Manager. 

CHAS. E. ELLIS, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Vaudeville, Dramatic, VSXFSXMsa 

724726 Chicaf o Opera Jluiise Block, CHICAGO, U. S. A 



When answering advertisementt kindly mention Variety. 






18 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



Bowers. Walters and Crooker 



THE 3 RUBES 



WEEK JUNE 25 RIVERSIDE PARK, MONTREAL, CA. WEEK JULY 2 OPEN 



BBN F\ 



BLLA 



GRIININELL mB GARDINER 

(Lat* of Thompson And Dundy's Hippodrome) 
WILL MAKE THEIR VAUDEVILLE DEBUT JUNE 23tH. AT YOUNG'S PIER. ATLANTIC CITY 



Afaaawemsnr LOUIS W EM LEY 



REIOH. PLUNKETT A WESLEY, St. Jmmmm Building 



Antoinette Le Brun 

Prima Donna 

FRITZ N. HUTTNANN 
Teaor 



L e Brun Grand Opera Trio 

JANES r. STCVCNS I SPLENDID SUCCESS IN VAUDEVILLE. 

?£? I SI, 500 PRODUCTION. ENCORED EVERYWHERE. BOOKED SOLID. 

*'IL TROVATORE*' P«rm»Mnt addraii ctf VARUTY, Chicago OHica, 79 §. ClmrH Street. 



JUGGLING THORNS 



Have returned from Mexico after closing a 
successful rtkWk with Or in Bros. Circus. Open 
time sfter June 18th. Regards to ell friends. 

Permanent Address, 58 Rose St., Buffalo, N. Y. 




TO MANAGERS, AGENTS 
AND GENERAL PUBLIC 



NOTIC 

SAM. I HOWE 

HEBREW COMEDIAN The Original "A'PHUE" 

Formerly of Howe A Scott. Will be featured in bis original production, season 1906 and 1907, under 
management of David Kraut. 

SOME OF MY PAST SUCCESSES: 

Original Parodies Written For Original Burlesques For 

Joe Welcb. Miaoo's 'City Club." Season 1898 1859. 

Julian Rosa. 'High Rollers," Seasons 1900, 1901, 1902, 1908, 1904. 

Little Chip. "Wine, Woman and Soar," Season 1900-1906. 
Howe & Scott. 

And others. 



Address All Communications to 



SAM. S. HOWE, Young's Hotel, Atlantic City, N. J. 



MAY HOWARD 

AT LIBERTY FOR SEASON 1906-7 

For Farce Comedy, Extravaganza or Burlesque 



Oan Furnish Entire Production for Burlosi 

FOR 8ALE-50 FUNNY BURI,E SOUKS, including "Trilby," " Fi- 
Fi," "One-Horse Circus," "Cyrano de Rubber-Neck," etc, etc., etc. 
Books by Harry Morris and Fred Solomon Music by Stromberg. 

Mdress MAY HIWAHP-MOWRIS, 8601 Prairie h% „ Chhsft 

Send 50 Cents and Have VARIETY delivered 
Three Months During the Summer 




WE CARRY THE 
LARGEST AMD MOST 
TARIED STOCK OF 
DICE IE THE WORLD. 

Try our new TRANS- 
PARENT, INVISIBLE 
SHAPES, axe as many 
as yon wish, let Player 
select sny 2. 

PRICE PER PAIR. 
$1.50. 

BICYCLE PAPER. $0 per dot., best on earth; 
Bio<k Out Ink also, for line work, per hot., 
91.00; CHICAGO 8ET SPINDLE, 920; Roulette 
Wheels complete. 1.000 Harris checks. $186; 
Check Cop. the Poker risyers' best friend, $3; 
Harris Inlaid Checks, any design, per M, $22. 
Send for our new cut-price catalogue. Free. 
JU8T OUT. 

H. C. EVANS A CO. 

1 26 Clark St., Chicago. 



A. H. WOODS 

C an use sister acts and eketch teams for 

ass* 



The Child 

Theatrical Trunk Works 

91S EAST 9TH STREET, NEW YORK. 
Send for Catalogue F. 

VAUDEVILLE HEADLINERS 

-GOOD STANDAIO ACTS 

V you bare as odd open weak you want Is 111 at 

short aotioe writs to W. L. DOCKBTADER, 

Oarrlok Tkeatro, Wilmington, Del. 

Can close Saturday night and make any city east 

sf Obieags to open Monday sight 



Have your Card in VARIETY 




Tailor 



6 West 29th Street 
NEW YORK 

National Hotel 

(EUROPEAN) 
Van Buren Street and Wabash Avenue, 

CHICAGO 

The Home of Vaudeville Artists. In vicinity of 
all tbeatree. Modern, up to date. Write for rates. 

D. A. DOOLEY, Prop. 

0RPHEUM CIRCUIT 

OP HIQH CLASS VAUDEVILLE THEATRES 



^^^J^^^H^^^^R^yr^^^^^R^'e^^^^^^Wsa^^^^a^a^^^^a^s^^s^^^^^^^^aBayyyyyya^a^^ ■< 



If. MEYIBJTELD. JR., 

MARTI* BECK, General 
FRANK VINCENT. N. Y. Representative. 
▲ 11 Applications fee Time Mast be Aiarosssi U 
O. B. BRAT. Bailing Manager, 

111. 



ARTISTS DESIRING TIME 

Please Writ, to 

GEORGE MANAGER 

HOMANS SOUTHERN 

St. James PARKS 

Building Amusement 

N. Y. 



TAPESTRY LEATHER 
SOUVENIR SPECIALTIES 



TAPESTRY LEATHER PILLOW 
CUSHIONS 

front and back stitched, complete with fringe, 
$9.00 per doe. 

TAPESTRY LEATHER POST CARDS 

$16.00 per thousand. 100 designs. Send for 
a sample order of 100 cards. $1.60, postpaid. 

ART TICKING PILLOW TOPS 

contain 15 catchy and beautiful colored de- 
signs. Burnt leather effect. $2.60 per dos. 

THE "DOOTIE" PURSE POST CARD 

In tan or white, a winning souvenir for any 
locality or place. Catchy designs, blank space 









for name. Burnt leather effect. Big sellers. 
Order now. $9.00 per gross; 86c per doc, 
postpaid. 

JULIETTE POST CARD PURSE 
"JUST OUT" 

A novel and attractive souvenir, with local or 
comic views, entirely new and original. Space 
also for Initial. Price $18.00 per gross. Send 
for a sample dos. $1.50, postpaid. 

A COMPLETE ALPHABET 

1 inch, fancy letters, brown Ink and pad, for 
stamping post cards or purses. $1.75 the set 

Complete catalogue of specialties 
•enf upon res neat 






THE SOUVEIIR PILLOW TOP GO. 



320 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK 



sSABk»k9aT<s»tejpe1e<s^^ , 

a 

When answering advertisement* Maefa* mention Variety. 






VARIETY 



» | 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISIS 



RAH !! 



RAH ! ! ! 



RAH ! 1 1 1 



BI 




. 



GASTON 



AND HIS 



DAN F. SULLIVAN 
CHAD HUEBUER 



COLLEGE CHUMS 



BOB DUNLAF 
JACK GOLDIE 



ALLAN 




Premier Manipulator of the World 

Returned from Australian Triumphs. Unique, Refined, Artistic Novelty. 
Address, 1193 Broadway, Room 9, Mew York City. 

Week Juno 25— Majestic Theatre, Chicago, 111. Week July 9— Olympic Theatre, Chicago, 111. 

THE GERMAN POLITICIAN 

CLIFF GORDON 



MATERIAL BY AARON HOFFMAN. 



CHUTES, SAN FRANCISCO.. JUNE 24- JULY 1. 



AL. SHEAN— WARREN, CHAS. 



IN THIIR ORIGINAL TRAVESTIES 



QUO VADIS-CAPT. KIDD 

PER ADD., 91 CHESTER STRICT, MOUNT VERNON, N V 

iMftOB 1907-8 Starring under direction of Percy William*. 

MIKE BERNARD 

Pianist at Pastor's Theatre 

Can accept other engagements. Clob work especially. Address ear* of Pastor's Theatre. 

"THE ATHLETIC GIRL" 



I 



BELLE COR 



• It 




WEEK JUNE 24— HARLEM PARK, ROCKFORD, ILL. 



OUT WEST 




HARRY JOLSOIN 



"THE GHETTO SPORT" 



The Clever 
Singing 
I Comedian 



Harry Jolson, who presents n Hebrew monologue at the Family tlila week, Is something awny from the stereotyped way of portraying s Hebrew character. 
Ilia way of delivering his monologue did not seem to tire his audience. He finished with a burlesque Imitation of an Italian singing Miserere from "II 

Trovatore" that brought down the house.-Tbe Butte Miner. Permanent Address, care VARIETY, Chicago Offi ce , 79 s. Clark Slreet 



■ . 



DIFFERENT FROM OTHERS 



CLEMENSO BROS. 

NOVEL-TV MUSICAL COMBDY 

ACROBATIC CLOWNS. TIME OF ACT, 12 MINUTES. Address Care VARIETY. 

FLORENCE SAUNDERS 



DRAMATIC SOPRANO 



IN VAUDEVILLE. 



00 AND HEAR HER SING. 



ALICE 



GVSSIC 



Hanson 



and 



Nelson 



IN VAUDEVILLE. 
SINGING and DANCING. 15 MINUTES IN ONE. JULY 2D, ELECTRIC PARK, BALTIMORE, MD. 



CLIFF E BERZAC 

The Laughter Maker 



AQIMT. H. M. MARIMELLI 



EDDIE SIMMONS 

will ahortly Ooiiore f tViLt, In their latent 
■paesr with biHarS A IllHf •fferlna, , *Tony" 



SB,* DUPREE 

mmrmmn Omntmdy by Frmnk Kmmnmtty 



Johnnie Weber 



COMEDIAN 

Re-Engaged by the Seme Management Neat Season 



Thanks for Offers 



LOOK US OVER. 



LESTER and QUINN 

DANCING EXPERTS. REFINED SINGING AND DANCING. 



O! Cotton Will be Lifted From the Ears PLEASE. 



Season 1906-'07 



THE ACKNOWLEDGED KING OF SLANG 



BERT LESLIE 3? HOGAN'S VISIT 



II 



Supported by Miss Mi 



Ohl Joy for those that drive dull core away. 
MUSIC BY THE COOPER FAMILY. 



» Sailor, Mr. Burrell Barbaretta and Co. 

Chaperoned by WILLIAM MORRIS, and pojitivly busy continuvuj/y oil next jtajon. 
Oh Pop Corn Brittle. NOTHING OPEN BUT MY WATCH. 



When an»u>eri**g •dvertitemenU kindly ss+sHo* Vaeictt. 



20 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



6- M OWATTS-6 



A SON IOO0 RINOLINO BROS.-RBABON 1007 BUROV»B 



KLEIN s CLIFTON 

PRE8ENT THEIR NEW NOVELTY ACT, 
"TUB DUn/VlY'8 HOLIDAY" 

Produced for the first time at Poll's, New Haven. June 4. and a big y a j l, S ^fcUl drop and 
handsome continue*. Copyrighted. Now booking time for next aeaaon. Permanent addreaa, 802 W. 
39th street, New York City. 



TIM McMAHON'S GIRLS 




BUMMER ADDRESS: IS SD STREET. BORDENTOWN, N. J. 



Willie Weston 

THE POCKET EDITION OF THE PEOPLE HE IMITATES. 
Exclusive Agent, AL. MAYER, St. James Bide BOOKED SOLID. 



James F. Dolan/Ida Lenharr 




NYE 



Assisted 
by his 



ROLLICKING GIRLS 



BOOKED SOLID SEA80N (1906-7). 



•THE WIRE TAPPER," 
"THE HIGH TONED BURGLAR." 



Presenting Mr. Dolan's Original Faroes, 



"TAKING CHANCES," 
"A BIT OF TRAVESTY." 
PERMANENT ADDRESS, 257 W. 111TH ST., NEW YORK. 



Roland West 

PROTEAN ARTIST 

BIG HIT AT HURTIG A SEAMON'S 

Management of LOUIS WESLEY, 

Reich, Plunkett & Wesley, St. James Building 

1>IL,Y SEVILLE 



Europe for summer. 



ENGLISH COMEDIENNE. 
Open Keith Circuit September. 



IDA CARLE, Representative. 



THE MAIN 
WITH THE 
BO U IN C - 
IING HATS 






Management JACK LEVY, 1 40 W. 4 2d Street 



Arthur Rigby 

"PURVEYOR OF FUN" 

£Wf ROUTE SULUVAN-CONSIDINE CIRCUIT 

The Man That Handed Laughs to SAM BERNARD 

LEW ADAMS 

GERMAN CHARACTER COMEDIAN. 

-" Last season playing W. B. Watson's part of "Kraussmeyer" with Washington Society Girls." 
At liberty.. My comedy guaranteed to fit any audience.. ADDRESS CARE VARIETY. 

Royal Musical 5 



KEITH and ORPHEUM CIRCUITS 
commencing September 



REICH, PLUNKETT A WESLEY 
ST. JAMCS BLDG. 



BESSIE VALDARES 

TROUPE OF CYCLISTS AND UNICYCLISTS 

SMARTEST DRESSED AND MOST REFINED BICYCLE ACT BEFORE THE PUBLIC. 

IDA CARLE. REPRESENTATIVE. 



e 3 INLANDS 

PRESENTING A COMEDY SINGING, DANCING AND MUSICAL ACT. 

Introducing Master Hyland, the only child Baton manipulator In the world. Managers wishing s good 
feature act for next season. Per, address, 28 Osborne St., Danbury, Conn. 



TON 
10TTA 
AND 
< UFfORD 




P. W. 



Curtin & Blossom 

1906-7 

/YlANAGEMEINT 8/UVt 9CRIBINER 



DRAMATIC SOPRANO, 



Sarah Louise Cogswell 

Replacing Miss Wilson, of STANLEY A WILSON. 
PERMANENT ADDRESS. 64 W. 6STK ST., NSW YORK CITY. 

^"-ALVIIN BROS. pete 



World's Greatest Comedy Ring Gymnasts. 



Banian's Pt. Theatre, Toronto, Ont., June 25 30. 



Whan answering advertisements 



Have Your 

kindly mention VARIETY. 



In UARIETY 



VARIETY 



21 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



MARVELOUS 





MOST WONDERFUL GYMNASTS IN THE WORLD 

HAMMERSTEIN'S PARADISE GARDENS NOW 

BOOKED SOLID SEASON 1906-07 Qy I\\ "V E F^ S Sc KELLER EXCLUSIVE AGENTS 



CHAS.&MISSJACAHEARN 



Comedy Unicyclists and Bicyclists Extraordinary 

ADDRE88 ALL AGENTS OR HEW TOEX OLIPPEE. 



1 



LILLIAN MAYNARD 

DAINTY SINGING COMEDIENNE. IN VAUDEVILLE. ADDRESS KEITH BOOKING OFFICE. 

BEAU IDEALS OF VAUDEVILLE 

JOHN EMILY 

DELMORE & DARRELL 



BOOKED SOLID FOB THE SUMMER. 



NOW BOOKING FOB NEXT SEASON. 



ORIOINAL PIANOLOGUE. 



Melville Ellis 



Chas. 




Evans 



& CO. 

Season of *06 and '07 Complete 



Address Princess Theatre 
New York City 






WM. MORRIS, Agent 



Time all filled 



AT LIBERTY 





No relation to Anna 



BLACK FACE MONOLOGUE, SONGS AND PARODIES, VAUDEVILLE, MINSTREL OR BURLESQUE 

Would Aooopt Stock Burlmsquo for Summer 107 EAST THIRTY-FIRST STREET 

GRAND RAPIDS PRKSS, FEB. 28TH. 



Wllbnr Held, blackface monologlst and parodist, 
bad several new things to offer, among wblcb his 
parody on "Yankee Doodle Dandy" called him 
back several times, as did a new parody on "In 
the Shade of the Old Apole Tree." 



WASHINGTON POST. 

llie St. Onge Brothers, in a comedy cycle act, 
and Wilbur Held, in a monologue, l»eing th<> lead- 
ers. 

PHILADELPHIA KNQL1KER, NOV. 14TH. 

Wilbur Held gave a bright monologue. 



BOSTON JOURNAL, JAN. tRD. I'lTTNIU IK! DISPATCH, OCT. 24TH. 

Of the olio, tin' minstrel premutation by Mr. Wilbur Held doos a black face act. Hinging some 

Wilbur Held deserved Hpecial < , »>iiwiH'inlHtion be- songn, and tHling a few new Stories. Ills Hinging 

cause of I be artistic manner of bis liii|M*ruoiia- of "Kvcrylx>dy Works But Father" was good, and 



lion. 



made ipiile a bit. 



^ 



SYNOPSIS 

Enter young man, lodging to And; Knter the Bowery girl, Wboie first name Is Liz, 

Enter young girl, who cries all the time; Then Jlmmi<\ her pal, ri«ht onto the biz. 

Suxaphone solo, music thats' sweet. A song and ■ dance that is the best ever 

Enter Old Maid whose talk is a treat, The musical doll rack; that's certainly clever. 

Transforming of cot-bed to a warship. if this psssles you and you want the key 

Playing on port holes, this is a sure hit. Just look at the name. 

MADELL and CORBLEY 



NAT S. JEROME 



FRIEND 



»» 



"OUR YIDDISH 

Playing Hebrew Ooraedy Parts In Stock at Trocadero Theatre, Chicago, for the Summer. 
WILL CONSIDER 0FFER8 FOR NEXT 8EA80N. 



Andy Lewis 

PAST SEASON LEADING FEATURE SAM DEVEREB OWN COMPANY. 

P. B.—YE8. MAUDE ELLIOTT RETURNS TO THE FOLD. 



SOMETHING NEW. 



SOMETHING NEW. 



Lambert - Williams 

Singing, Dsnoing, Talking Aot, 

"OUT SHOPPING." 

Now booking for summer parks. 

All agents invited. 

FOR SALE 

WIGGINS FARM 

Apply to THE CHADWICK TRIO. 

BELL and HENRY 

"THE 8LEEPT MAN," 
Will shortly arrive in America. 

Harry Holm an 

IN VAUDEVILLE. 
BOOKED 80LID UNTIL MAY. 1907. 



William Gould 



AND 



Valeska Suratt 

Address Eccentric Club, London, W. C, until Sep- 
tember 1st. 
Cabls sddress, "Reichplunk." 

THREE MITCHELLS 

Vaudeville Faveritee 

FAREWELL AMERICAN APPEARANCE. 
EUROPE, 1907. 

CHEMDAH SIMPSON 

IN VAUDEVILLE. 
SUA W «7U> St. N»» fM% 



HAY/E YOUR CARD I IS VARIETY 



THE WORLD'S 
FAMOUS 



Mardo 




OOMIMO EAST. Open from S9*fmbor tOth. For time and term* sddrees REIOH, PLUNK ETT & WESLEY, SU Jmmmn Blrtg., Rmom 1024 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



22 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




The 



SISTERS AND BROTHERS 

Have closed a very successful season with the great Orpheum Road Show. Are 



THE DANCING STARS 

boo ked solid for 1006-7 under the management of Mr. Kohl, of Kohl and Castle. 





THE BANDIT 



Copyright XXC, No. 8.531. 
Ilia own molodramatlc success. Now bonking season 1906-07. 
Week June 25. Olympic. Chicago: week July 1. Electric Park. South 
Rend, Ind. Address all communications care "Variety," Chicago 
Office. 79 8. Clark St., or my sole agent, Mr. Edward Hayman, 
Western Vaudeville Assn., Chicago. 



THE GREAT ROSAIRE 

DIRECTION BOYLE AGENCY 
31 WEST 31st STREET - - NEW YORK CITY 



GEO. P. MURPHY, Jr. 

The Man With the BlacRboard 

Address, Atlantic Hotel, Fair Haven, V. J. 

Re-engaged next g eMon . 

FEATURED MANAGEMENT CAMPBELL it DREW. 



mindf 



Asm International Triumph 



t\ ROYAL- HIT l%T THE 



N. S. BENTHAM O. H. HARK A 5. 

Peraer\al Manager 

ED MARKUH. Press Representative. 



E 



9 I 



IE LEONARD 



HAS SIGNED FOR TWO YEARS WITH LEW DOCKSTADER'S MINSTRELS AS A SPECIAL 
FEATURE. Management Chaa. D. Wilson. Many thanks to vaudeville managers for their kind offers. 



••THE MUSICAL LAUOH /VVAKBR6" 



FRED 



ECKHOFF and 




ANNA 



TWCNTY.IOUR MINUTES 
REAL MUSIC REAL OOMEOY 



SOLID LAUGHS AND APPLAUSE AWAY FROM ALL, OTHERS 

Address REICH, PLUNKETT * WESLEY, 1133 Broadway, N. Y. City 



PRESS WORK, DOES IT PAY? 

STARS—SOME 
WORKED 




Dick McAllister 



ss 



31 West 31st Street, New York 



frevoli 

CHAPEAUGRAFHIBT. MAGICIAN A SHADOW- 
QRAPHI8T PAR EXCELLENCE. 

Princess Chinquilla 
and Newell 

PER ADD. JAMAICA, L. L 



IRENE LA TOUR 



AND HER 
CLEVER DOG 



ZAZA 



ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO 

921 GARDEN ST.. HOHOKEN. V. t. 





ENGLISH CHARACTER COMEDIENNE. 



"THAT BAD BOY 

in a "Night la an Emglisk Mualo Hall." 



WORLD'S GREATEST BAG PUNCHER 

Seeback 

Week June 25— Casino Park, Binghamton, N. Y. 

^ m g^ p^ BBSansBBBVB^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBH BSBBSn BlBBBBlSBBHBBSBl BB^ SBBVejBSBSl V SsaSBS* 

W/ALTER 

McPherson 

You Need Me in Vaudeville 

Management JACK LEVY, 140 W. 42d St. 



May Ward 

New York' 'm 
Fmvorlto Oomodlmnnm 

L eona Jhurber 

AND HER 

4 BLACKBIRDS 

Booked solid Beam 1S06-7. 
Direction M. S. Bent ham. 
Pickaninnies Singing German. 

JEANETTE DM 

AND HER SIX SWEETHEARTS. 



SHEPPARD CAMP 

"TOsT MAM FROM QEORBIA" 








BOOKED SOLID SEASON 1906-07 



VAUDEVILLE'S GREATEST ACROBATIC COMEDIANS 

Bj^j>ur_E«cluslve^g^nts > MYERS A KELLER 



KEITH AND ORPHEUM CIRCUITS 



Brockman, Mack and Belmont 

"THE COUNT ON MOTHER'S ACCOUNT" 
Comedy Travesty Act witH New Songs and Coatumee for the Coming Seaaon. Management of Reich, Plunkett (a* Weeley 

When answering advertisement* kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



23 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



TH 



TWO 



MEN 



IM 



IA/ 



COLLINS 



AND 



HART 



CARRYING THE ONLY CAT MUSICIAN IN THE WORLD 

Will present at Hammerstein** their new burlesque comedy act, which it far superior to their present offering:. Have signed new contract this week on the strength of the new act for 
entire summer. If you want to know how good they are see the way Hammerstein bills them on the program. This is an original idea that was to have been presented on their re- 
turn from England. 



i 



A HUMOROUS, ENTERTAINING NOVELTY, 
(A REAL CHINAMAN— NOT A PAKE.) 



LEE-TUNG-F 



• It 



WORLD'S ONLY CHINESE BARITONE. 

Singing American, German and Chinese Songs. June 11— Hammerstein' s Roof Garden. 



NAT 



SOL 



Fields 



A 



D 



Fields 



With T. W. Dinkins next season. Putting on both shows. 

Thanks to managers for offers. 

Address FIELDS AND FIELDS, Care T. W. Dinkins, Knickerbocker Theatre 

Building, New York. 



JEANNE BROOKS 

"The Girl with the Smile." 

Booked Solid Summer Season by William Morris' 

Chicago Office, 167 Dearborn Street. 



AT LAST 



Two Real Muaiciana in a Real Comedy Musical Aot. 

Pinartl »"« Whits 

At liberty for coming season. Both play responsible parts.. Address care VARIETY. 



f\ REAL GENUINE HIT IN VAUDEVILLE 



The Sexton 



f 




Dream 



SCORED AT HURTIQ & SEAMOM'S WEEK OF JUNE 4TH 



MANAGEMENT, LOT/IS WESLEY, 



REICH, PLUNKETT A WESLEY, ST. JAMES BUILDING. 






STILL 



NEW YORK 



Playing on Hammerstein's Roof 



ORIGINAL! 



ORIGINAL! 



ORIGINAL! 



JOSEPH K. WATSON 

Next Season, TWENTIETH CENTURY GIRLS 

Direction Maury Krouse 

Hoffman writes my talhing material 

Joseph K. Watson writes my singing material 



HOWARD 



DOLLY 



POWERS and THEOBALD 

" Tho Human Doll mod Hmr Boau" 

ENGAGED WITH MR. GU8 HILL COMING SEA80N. Address care VARIETY. 



FRANK 



TIA/O 



SILVESTOS 



FLOIIA In their greet novelty act. "Raft's and Oil" 

Invito oflfi-rs for next wason. Address can* VARIETY, 
Chicago Office, 75) B. Clark Street. 



Absolutely tln» tiegt dressed act of Ha kind. 



CHAS. 



Leonard Fletcher 

IN ENGLAND. 

Address, 401 STRAND, LONDON 



Jack Irwin 

AT LIBERTY for Burlesque 

JUST CLOSED AT SID J. EUSON'B. CHICAGO, TO WHOM I REFER. Play any part and do 
STRONG SPECIALTY. Singing, talking and danoing. Finished successful season on Kehl and Castle 
and Orpheum circuits. Address eare VARIETY, Chicago Office, 79 8. Clark St. 



ITALIA 



The Dainty Hinging and Dancing Comedienne. 
SINGS HER OWN 80N0S IN VAUDEVILLE. 

ADDRESS - - WM. MORRIS 



HARRY 



IDA 



SALMON <& CHESTER 



Australian Entertalnera lu thetf London Ouster act. 



Week June 85 — Park, Youngetown, OkLo. 






• 






Henry Clive <& 
William Gould 



Management LOUIS WESLEY 



U/ye Mysterious 

Chinese Automaton 

THE ACME Or ILLUSORY 

CREATION, TREMENDOUS 

SUCCESS 

REICH, PLUNKETT & WESLEY, ST. JAMES BUILDING. 
When anxwtving advertisements kindly mentUn Variety. 




24 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



CHICAGO UNrtNl/nOUSLY ENDORSED 



WILLIAM 

6k CO. In ••UNDER THE THIRD DEGREE 




Joonifll: Tho peif<iiiiiniM«> Mr. ( 'mn 1 1< l«)i given 
is Inti rt-stliiy far nlM>v<> I he MTPfage of the iihu.iI 
lirnti line not. He ■ppTOTSW Ins work Mineerely. 
In '"Hie 'lliii.t Desnt" Ms iiuikeiip in nil the 
rolM if v«*ry good aihI he <lt>|H'iu!s not a little 
H|M>n this fart. He I* able to vary his votee 
and his stilt ii re, lii> attltmle and fait an<l is an 
aeior with a forceful inanner of ilHivvry. 

Chronicle: Unlike many of the Krailiiates from 
tlie legttlmiite, who invade the vaudeville lit-id 
lor a lline, W i II i h in Court IHkIi, who is the head 
i liter al the Mnjcktie tills week, actually sue 
reeds In making p»nI for I lie dotiide reason thai 
lie lift* an attractive sketch and |m>hscsscs a S*S S 
inc aldllty UK an a dor. His vehicle, which is 



en I led "Tbt Third Degree." is an American 
adaptation In brief of Ji an JaninllUanrand's 
story which has formed the bash* for Henri I>e 
Vrlev' play, "A Case of Arson." In this sketch 
Mr. Court h luh represents nine dlnVn-nt ohar- 
acte.'s, eaeh well drawn and consistent and all 
of them Involved in a |M>llce examination which, 
in the Hugo of the InsjM'dor'H office, is called 
"Taking the Tlilrd Degree." There Is so much 
skill involved In the various ehaiacterlxntloiiH 
Hint Mr. ftnirllflicli S*ti «jultc away from the 
commoii|>lace iiicMhmIs of Hie ordinary i|iiick change 
or protean artist. lie represents In turn an 
Italian, a Jew. a Herman, an Irish |N>llceinan, a 
Himple mi mled ls»v, a tough |K»liti<al Imiss. a 
Cltiuamaii and an American, and does not fail at 



any time to preserve an artistic conception in a 
thoroughly dramatic inanner. It is a long time 
since Hie vaudeville stage has seen a more satis- 
fy ing exhibition of skill In this dltlleiilt art, 
and Mr. Court leigh may thus he said to have 
succeeded where most actors fail. No doubt this 
is due to his wide experience as lending man to 
such artists as Maxine RUlott, Virginia Darned 
and with Hie Frohinan companies In which he has 
had leading parts. 

Inter Ocean: "The Tlilrd Degree" relates the 
story of a ]mn>i- chap who set tire to his shop, 
and the investigation conducted by the poller. 
lie fore the division captain the suspected man is 
examined, ami several witnesses are called In. 



By R. C JVIa^CULLOCH 

nit by bit the story is gathered and pieced to- 
; gether, until at last the man la forced, to a 
I confession, and liegs to be taken away to prison 

when he learns that his baby I toy wan burned In 

I the tire Court leigh plays all the v\ itnesaea and the 

i prisoner himself. The changes of costume and 

nakeup are skillfully and quickly accomplished, 

: and the various characters, Including those of an 

Italian, a Jew, a Herman, an Irish policeman, a 

simple minded ls»y. a Chinaman, etc., are cleverly 
; HSsutiM d. A M each has some particular Iteur- 
\ Ing on the story, they hold the little play well 

together, and last night's audience followed It 
I with ritpt r.t tent ion. 

Courtlelgh displays greater versatility than he 

lias previously toe* given credit for. 



m. S. BENTHAM, Agent 



GEORGE 



McKay 



and 



Fredericks 






ROSE 



(Late off Julian Mitchell's " Wond«rUnd " Co.) 

Presenting in Vaudeville a Little ef Everything That Means Good Singing, Dancing and Comedy 

Management of Messrs. MURDOCH, STERNAD and HAYMAN, Majestic Theatre Building. 

Permanent Address Cars VARIETY, Chicago Office, 79 S. ClarK Strsst 



Booked Solid 



«« 



TH E BIG ACT 



•• 



Keno, Walsh m Melrose 

COAIEDY ACROBATS 

Now in our 67th consecutive week, playing all the leading vaudeville theatres in America. Olympic, Chicago, this week. For open time address 

our exclusive agent MR. ALBERT SUTHERLAND, St. James Bldg., New York. 









HAVE GONE SOME AND GOING TO 




JO 




« « 



MO 



t t 



i 



ALONE 



ON 



Management CHRIS. 0. BROWN 



ERNEST HOGAN 



The Only Negro Ptrformer That Ever Made Good on a Roof Garden in New York. 44 Wteka on the New York Roof. An Rntir« 

on Hammentein'i. THINK IT OVER! Will Star Again Next Season with the Unprecedented Hit. 
.__ "RUFUS RASTVS." Management Hurtig Oh Seamon. 



Season 



KING KOLLINS 






WORLD'S GREATEST BANJOIST (wS&iPtttfL) 



Big Hit at Olympic 
Theatre, Chicago, last 
week. Booked solid. 

Permanent address care VARIETY 
Chicago Office, 79 S. ClarK St. 






Season 1906-0 7 



VAUDEVILLE 

"HAM TREE" 




C O . 

When answering advertisements kindly mention VarOcty. 



Second Season 



VARIETY 



25 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




AND 




Just closed a successful ■ 
Hay man of the 



Sept. 8— Keith's, OleTeland, 0. 

•• 10— O. 0. H., Pittsbarf, Ps. 

" 17— Chase's, Washington, D. C. 

" 24— Maryland, Baltimore, lid. 
Oct. 1— Kelth'a. Philadelphia, Pa. 



In their Comedy Sketch "THE POOL'S ERRAND" 

esssn on the Orpheum. Hopkins and Kohl Jt Castle circuits. BOOKED SOLID FOR NEXT SEASON by J. J. Murdoch:. J. Bternad and Ed. 
Western Vaudeville Association. Majestic Theatre Building. Chicago. Address care variety. Chics *o Office, 79 B. Clark at. 

OUR ROUTE FOR NEXT 8BASON • 

Oct. 8— Keith's, Prorldeaee, R. I. Nov. 12— Temple, Detroit, Mich. Dec. 17— Majestic, Chicago. Jnn. 21— Coliiiuhla, Cincinnati. 

" 15— Keith's, Boston, Mass. " 19— Moore's, Rochester, N. Y. - 24— Haymarket, Chicago. " 28— Hopkins', LoolsTllle. 

" 22— Moore's, Portland, Me. " 26— Shea's, Buffalo, N. Y. •• 31— Colombia, St. Lonla. Feb. S— Hopkins', Memphis, Teon. 

" 20— Keith's, New York City. Dec. 3— Shea's, Toronto, Can. Jan. 7— Olympic, Chicago. " 10— Majestic. Little Rock, Ark. 

Nst. 6— O. O. H., Syracuse, N. Y. " 10— Travel. •• 14— G. 0. H., Indianapolis. Othar datea to follow. 



The Celebrated Comic Opera Star 

MISS VIRGINIA EARL 



AMD HER 



JOHNNIES 



WHEELER EARL 

The Butler 
FRANK GARFIELD 
J05. W. HERBERT, Jr. 



ALBERT L. PELLATON 
ED. T. MORA 
HARRY L. TIQHE 
Accompanist 



Stmged by ED. ROGERS. 



F.X.HENNESSY 

IRISH UNION PIPER SCOTCH HIGHLAND PIPES *\ / / 

'# mi. I Violinist (iimsicliiiO. M | » 

\ Permanent address, MILITARY HALL, 193 BOWERY, NEW YORK, U J 

9 or your agent. 

'» I*, s. The Irish Union ripe is recngulsed sa Ireland's national musical 
fXHtNNtsSY Inatrotueat novel and ran* a giMMi drawing card. 





MMUatiSt 



HEADLINE ACT! 



UNA CLAYTON 



AND 

CO. 



TjrOLUDINO 

FRANCIS MOREY and MARIE GEBHARDT 

IV THE ONE-ACT COMEDY, 

"WHAT'S IN A NAME?" 

BY JACQUES PUTRELLE. 

its • • xhe hit f the season at the Dominion."— Winnipeg (Man.) Tribune. 

"Come again."— Manager Kobold. 

OLYMPIC, CHICAGO. JUNE 85-JULY 1. 




MUMMING BIRDS" or 



"A Night in an English Music Hall" 

(ALL RIGHT* LEGALLY PROTECTED.) 
USUAL GREAT HIT AND GETTING THE HONEY BACK. ORPHEUM WESTERN CIRCUIT. 



June 11 -Sun Frinu-iBro (Chutes). 
June is San Francisco (t'liuton). 
July 2 -Olympic, Chicago. 
July 9- Majestic, Chicago. 
July 2.'1- Proctor's, Albany. 



< 



July .'M> -Proctor's, Troy. 

August t Procter's KM St., Now York. 

August irv — Proctor's. Newark. 

August 20— Proctor's n8th St. 

August 27 — Iliiiiiiiii'i-sf flu's Victoria Tlicatrc. 



▲11 communications address ALF. REEVES, Manager en route 

ch,. E INNESS & RYAN »»<•> 



BOOKED SOLID. 



PLAYING THE WESTERN PARKS. 



AGENT, JO PAIGE BHITH. 



WILFRED CLARKE 

Assisted by MISS THCO CARCW (Si CO. 

Presenting His Sketches 

NO MORE TROUBLE *nd WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT 

ADORIMM, LAMBM' OLUB 



AT LIBERTY NEXT SEASON. 



PHILBROOKSiREYNOLDS 

PRESENTING 

"MISS STENO, STENOGRAPHER" 

A GERMAN COHEDY SKETCH. 
In preparation a comedy act is one Address WM. H0RRI8. 



Fred Watson 



AND 
THE 




NOW BOOKING NEXT SEASON. 



Hal Godfrey & €0. 



(i 



PRESENTING NEXT SEASON 
it 



THE LIAR" By Edmund Day INO "A VERY BAD BOY" By Arthur Lamb 

Two of the few standard sketches in Vaudeville. 

Address all communications to REICH, PLTJNKETT 4 WESLEY, sxcluslvs sfasts. 



Irving Trio 



Direction JACK LEVY, 140 W. 42d Street 



WILLIAM 




(Late With RICHARD CARLE) 

Creator of The l:ph-oph-soph-alos of " The Storks "; A. (irouch in M The Explorers "; The Hindoo in 4 * The 
Forbidden Land"; Chinaman in " The Tenderfoot"; and The Son* Book Boy in "The Mayor of Tokio." 

Begs to announce that he has severed his long and friendly connection with Mr. Carle to enter VAUDEVILLE. 

Particulars later. Address, Care VARIETY, Chicago Office, 79 S. Clark Street. 

}\'hcn answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



26 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



DAN 



ADDIE B. 



GRACEY 




Eccentric Comedian 

AT LIBERTY NEXT SEASON. 

Full of action tip to date. 



BURNETT 

Original Singer of Coon Songs 

BIG COMEDY ACT. 

Address, Box 63, Fair Haven, N. J. 






THE DANCING WONDERS 

JACK. 1_I1_LI«IN 

BROWN I WRIGHT 

GREATEST NOTELTY 8INGING AND DANCING ACT IN VAUDEVILLE. 

BEATRICE McKENZIE 

Supported bv WALTER SHANNON end CO. 

U Lew H. Newoomb's delightful musical playlet, "A MONTANA BEAUT," in vaudeTille. Have a 
few weeks open. Address oar* Variety. Chicago office, 79 8. Clark St. 

F "" k McCREA and POOL R " 

SENSATIONAL SHOOTING ACT 

OPEN CHALLENGE TO THE WORLD SHOOTING AT A HUMAN TARGET. NO ONE BARRED. 
Address AL MAYER, Room 810, St. James Building. Booked solid until June, 1907. 



Si Brooks id tee lunette 

COMEDIAN. SOUBRETTE. 

"ON THE MAIN STREET" 

14 Minutes In One * Permanent Address. 20 B. 113th Street 



THE BLACK ACT 



JACK WILSON & CO. 



ALBERT GREEN 



-WTTH- 

-IN- 



ADA LANE 



"AN UPHEAVAL IN DARKTOWN M 

18 MINUTES IN ONE. BOOKED SOLID 8EASON 1900-7. 

EXCLUSIVE AGENTS, MYERS it KELLER. 



MAX 



OF'R'ERS INVITED 



SADIE 



BROOKS andfirVEDDER 

1 (5 Mi'uti C.sidy entitled "NOT YET T T 7 BUT 8001" 

104 W. 40' h ST.. NBW YORK CITY FINISH IN ONB 



- 



COLLINS 




BROWN 



K 



In en 
AFFAIR OF HONOR" 



An Entire N«w Offering 
in the Dutch Field. 



PI A R If I Eugene and Willie Howard 

I isBssa ■ K s* llssm < HO\A//%RE> <<Lr HOWARD) 





GERMAN DIALKfT ©OMEDIAN. 



CLOSED SEASON WITH MINERS AMERICANS. 



I'iitsbaig LaMvr: K. A. ('lurk is ihe lending romnlian, mid dot* his work e gf — d tagiy well. 

ADDRESS 245 W. 30TH ST., NEW YORK CITY. 




Taylor 



CONTRALTO 

Treoadero Theatre Stock Company for the Summer. Add' ess TROCADERO THEATRE, OHICAGO. 

THE MUSICAL BELLBOY AND MILITARY MAID. 



Willie Howard is the Original Hebrew Messenger Boy 

WEEK JUNE 18— KEITHS UNION SQUARE. BOOKED SOLID UNTIL JUNE, 1900. 

DIRECTION OF MYERS A KELLER, 31 W. 318T ST. 




Mme. Anna Plum. 



OPERA 110 

Signori Tortorico and Busbi. 



In condensed versions of "II Trovatore" and "Faust" trios. 
Bonaflde Grand Opera Singers who have sung- in Grand Opera. 
Scenery and costume changes. IDA CARLE, Representative, St. James Building. 



fred CRAY and GRAHAM nellie «*>»» THE MUSICAL BRENNANS «»« 



TWICE DAILY AT PASTORS. WEEK JUNE 26TH. 



MUSICAL ENTERTAINERS. 



PERMANENT ADDRESS, CARE OF VARIETY. 



^ 



Si 




Sensational and Comedy Cyclists 



TO LET by our 



on 




agents MYERS & KELLER, 

)\ tun answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



31 WEST 3 1 ST STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 



VARIETY. 



V 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 






Address William Morris 

EMMA FRANCIS 



and 

her 



Arabian Whirlwinds 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

Dimcnow om.i. ■ihtham 

RICE & PREVOST 

IN r 

BUMPTY BUMPS 

Arthur J. Miss Grace 

McWATERS ..d TYSON 

In a Spectacular Musical Comedy 
"VAUDEVILLE" 

WEEK JUNE IS— TEMPLE, DETROIT. 

D UNEDIN T ROUPE 

WORLD-FAMED MARVELLOUS 

ARTISTIC and ACROBATIC CYCLISTS 

Introducing Cycling on the Telephone Wire. 
Challenge the world to And their equal. JAB. E. 
DONEGAN, Managing Director. Permanent ad- 
dress: Forepaugh & Belli Bros.' Show. 

STitf BROTHERS 

Variety's Greatest Comedy Cycle Act 

Concluding with a eeriea of poses, aooompanied by 

a monologue by FRED ST. ONOE. 

Agent, WILLIAM MORRIS. 




8IONED WITH BOB MANCHESTER FOR NEXT 
8EA8QN. 

JOE EDMONDS 

""" B SsV * Vaudeville 
LOUISE DRESSER 

Characteristic Songs 



it* 





!» 



F. Daly Burgess 

GOMEDIAN 
And m« Dos. - FINNEGAN 

In Vaudeville 



F 



THE REAL GERMAN COMEDIANS 

JOE MM Si MARK 

ields-Wolley 

"A TRIP IN AN AIRSHIP." 

WEEK JUNE 25— KEITH'S, BOSTON. 

ED. F.REYNARD 

Ventriloquist 

Season 1901-S— Great Lafayette Shew. 

Season 1903-4— Orpheum Shew. 
Season 1004 6 Touring T^g lsnd. 
Season 1905-6 — Touring; Amerloa. 
Season 1906-7— Orphoum Show. 

Exolnslvo Agent, WILLIAM MORRIS. 

Browning 

[R NEWEST COMEDY SKETCH IN 01 
ENTITLED 

"GOING INTO VAUDEVILLE." 

BILLIE RITCHIE 

"The Drunk" 

A Night in an English Music Hall 



AND 



10 MINUTES IN ONE. 



HELSTON & 0LLA-H00D 

SINGING, DANCING, COMEDY 

IN STOCK 
INVITE- OFFERS RIVERSIDE PARK, 

NEXT SEASON BOISE CITY, IDAHO. 



1Q06 



Gommdlmn 



1907 



CHARLEY HARRIS 

THE HEBREW GLAZIER. 
THE INSPECTOR. 
THE GIBSON GIRL. 
90 MINUTES LAUGH— 1. S, 1. 
Late ef Harris A Walters. 

JAGK NOKWOBTH 

Prevent* THE COLLEGE BOY 

BELL and HENRY 

"THE SLEEPY MAM," 
Will ahortly arrive in Amerloa, 



Have Your Card in VARIETY 



Everything Salubrious I 

SAM RICE 

Tel. 114 Riverside. 
1S1 W. 95TH ST., NEW YORK CITY. 

V. P. WOODWARD 

Uambourfne Juggler 

OPEN TIMS) ADDRESS MORBUS 



CHA8. 



LILLY ■■ 



Colby -May 

The Ventriloouist and 

The Dancin* Doll 

In Europe for One Year. 

Playing Return Dates Every whera 

Per. Add. 20 Wellington St.. Strand W. 0.. 
London, Bngland. 



Chas (TWO) Alice 

Shrodes 

CAMPING 

JOE 

HAYMAN 



and 



MILDRED 



FRANKLIN 



In "A SUIT FOR DIVORCE" 
Now playing in England. 

WILLIAMS 
and DiXEY 

In Vaudeville with th«*lr latest offering, 

"A MAKESHIFT BENEFACTOR." 

Permanent Address: 217 W. 18th St., City. 

(ilO.W.HUSSEY&CO. 

VENTRILOQUIAL COMEDY. 

BURROWS -TRAVIS (0. 

ADDRESS VERPLANK, N. Y. 

D ancing H owards 

ARTISTIC SINGING ffld DANCING EXPERTS 

July 8th— J. K. Burke's Circuit of Parks. 

Have some time open in June. 

ADDRESS ALL AGENTS. 



VER8ATILE. 



NACiEL i ADAMS 

NOVELTY AND COMEDY DUO. 

GartelleBros. 

SKATORIALISM 



AGENTS TAKE NOTICE. 



<&> 



e 



ZARELLS 



EUROPEAN EQUILIBRISTS— SOMETHING NEW 



Ross - Vack 

GERMAN COMEDIANS 
Permanent addreas, 11 Wsst 114th at., Mew York. 



The Dcmi-Tasse 




Comedian. 



"THE NARROW FELLER. 1 * 

HILL AND 

SYLVIANY 

Address REICH, PLUNKETT A WESLEY, 

St. James Building. 

MUSICAL SIMPSONS 

XL, and that msaas something. 




28 



VARIETY 



i r 



- ' - - - - 



■ - • ■ - — - ■ 



■ « • 



EUGENE SANGER 



RICHARD PITMAN 






. 



SANGER 




PITMAN 



ANNOUNCE ONE OF THEIR BIG SCENIC PRODUCTIONS: 



DRUM-HEAD COURT MARTIAL 

By EDWARD MeWADE and EUGENE SANGER 

A TWENTY MINUTE MELODRAMATIC COMEDY WITH SPECIAL SCENERY AND LIGHTS. 

SANGER & PITMAN, Knickerbocker Theatre Building, New York City 



* 



Other big productions in preparation. 



Telephone: 412— 38th Street. 







FRANK MELVILLE'S 






County Fair Attractions 

THE STANDARD OF AMERICA 










PAST FLOOR. 
KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING 
1403 Broadway, New York 



New York, June 13th, 



1906 


















Variety Publishing Company » 

Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 

City. 

# 

Dear Sirs:- 

■ 

In making a resume of rarlcus channels in which I have been 
advertising during the past few months, it seems only fair that 
X commend "Variety* as being one of the best mediums I have ever 
used. My recent advertisements in your paper hare not only 
brought answers, but actual results. I can trace the addition of 
two parks on my circuit this season directly through an advertise** 
-ment placed in your columns. 

The satisfaction I have obtained in advertising with- you 
is not only demonstrated by my recommendation to others, but the 
fact that I will be glad to continua with you whenever I have 
occasion to advertise. ' 

Yours very truly, 
P.M. 



■ 









- 






WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. 




DROF US A POSTAL AND THE MAN WILL CAUL. 



■ 






• 






• 






Managers and Agents 

NOTICE 

There is only one Tasmanian Troupe. 

Three ladies and One gentleman. 

Refined and legitimate acrobats with the 
original three high breakaway finish. 

Jack Sutton, 

MANAGER 

20 1 East 14th Street, City 

NOTICE. 

To my FRIENDS and "OTHERS," especially 
the "OTHERS." 

MISS ALICE PHILBROOKS 

(Nee Mr*. Sidney Reynolds) 
was Kraut. >,i an absolute divorce from D. S. 
Axtell. and IS MY WIFE, contrary to all malicious 
Ilea. (S^ued) SIDNEY REYNOLDS. 




Learned by any man or boy at home. Small coat. 
Send to-day 2-cent stamp for particular* and proof. 
O. A. SMITH. Suite 15, 8040 Knox villa Ave., 
• PEORIA, ILL. 



SCENERY 

SILKO, THE PERFECT TRUNK KIND 

Daniels Scenic Studios, Chicago 



VVU Vl/Vll Sell Like HOT CAKES!! 
You make 100* to 360* Profit. 

FREE Illustrated Catalogue of over loo 
varieties, T. C. MOTT, 

415-417 Dearborn Street. CHIC AOO, III. 



-»•»-! . > 7 » 



"TIME" INSURANCE 

Insuring against loaa of time due to Accident, 
Sickness, Death or loaa or damage to costumes, 
srenery and properties when caused by lire or 
wreckage, sinking, collision or other accident to 
tnins|Mir tatloti conveyance In which property may 
be In transit. "Time In Money"— Insure It! 

Time* Building / DIXIE HINES, 
Times Square 



ng \ DIXIE HINES, 1 Telephone, 
. I INSURANCE. \ 2500 Bryant. 



ACTS WANTED 

GOTHAM AMUSEMENT CO., Coates villa, Pa. 

D. A. Howard, Treasurer.. C. B. Young, Manager. 

Singing, dancing, sketch teams, lots of singles 
and doubles Irish and Ibitch comedians, soubrettes, 
etc. We are now oiam for the summer under 
canvas with plenty of money behind us to pay 
for good people. 



1 






*T* 



rWENTY^FOUR PAGES, 



FIVE CENTS. 




Entered as second class matter December 22, 1UU6, at the post office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of Congress of March M, 1870 



VARIETY 



VAUDEVILLE IN THE MANHATTAN. 

Joseph Hart and William A. Brady have 
secured a lease of the Manhattan Theatre 
for next season and will conduct it as a 
vaudeville house, probably booking through 
the William Morris Agency. The house 
has been condemned by the city for public 
improvements and will be given over to the 
McAdoo tunnel people. Work on the new 
tunnel has not progressed' as rapidly as at 
first figured and it is not now expected that 
the ground will be required until next 
April. A clause in Hart's lease gives the 
McAdoo company the right to notify the 
new tenants to vacate within sixty days at 
any time during the life of the agreement. 



KEITH OFFERS TO BUY CHASE. 

B. F. Keith is desirous of conducting 
his own theatre in Washington and has 
made P. B. Chase, who has the booking 
right in the Keith Agency for that city, 
a proposition to withdraw. 

Chase is wealthy and evinces a willing- 
ness to sell out if Keith will pay his price. 
Owing to the Government having con- 
demned the present Chase's Theatre, re- 
quiring the ground for park purposes, the 
deal may be more easy of arrangement 
than und'er other conditions. 

After next season the building will be 
torn down and a new house will have to 
he erected, A* site three blocks below 
Lafayette square has been selected by Mr. 
Chase, provided he remains Keith's Wash- 
ington manager. 



K.-P. BACK TO PIANOS. 

The difficulties between the Musical 
Union and the Keith-Proctor city the- 
atres over the salary question may be 
the means of reviving the solitary piano 
player as the orchestra at Twenty -third 
Street and the Union Square until the 
matter is adjusted. 

The union has posted a notice that 
members must not play in either house 
"until further notice." The management 
declare the union price will not be paid'. 

The orchestras in the two theatres have 
served notice that they will quit to-mor- 
row (July 1). It is said that Emil Kat- 
zenstein, the Union Square Theatre or- 
chestra leader, has tendered his resignation 
as a member of the union in order that 
he may be qualified to continue alone as 
the piano-player in that house after the 
others walk out. 

Keith-Proctor may in the emergency 
recruit orchestras from other sources, al- 
though the piano playing scheme for over 
the summer is strongly favored. 



M. A. SHEA RETURNS EMPTY- 
HANDED. 

After spending six weeks abroad looking 
for foreign acts for the Eastern Burlesque 
Wheel companies, M. A. Shea, the agent, 
returned home on Wedneday with the 
statement that he had not booked one act 
from the other side. 

Mr. Shea said that he did not see any- 
thing in the vaudeville line he thought 
suitable. The acts he would have taken 
were equally well liked by the foreign 
managers, according to Mr. Shea, and they 
have been booked far ahead, preventing 
an apeparance in America before their 
contracts are fulfilled. 



EASTERN WHEEL HAS DRAWING. 

A meeting of the Eastern Burlesque 
Wheel managers was held on Thursday at 
the offices of Hyde & Behman in Brooklyn, 
when routes for the coming season were 
drawn by the managers. 

The season is of forty weeks, and the 
Eastern route sheet called for thirty- 
three houses and the same number of 
shows, leaving return engagements for 
seven weeks. 

Included in the list of houses were the 
three Sullivan & Kraus theatres in New 
York, together with the former "Eastern" 
houses in Albany and Troy, these five hav- 
ing joined the Western Wheel. This will 
require more houses to be added to re- 
place the missing five, or additional re- 
turn dates. 

While the failure of the Sullivan & 
Kraus firm to appear at the drawing is pre- 
sumptive evidence that it has joined the 
opposition, it is not legally conclusive. It 
will become necessary for the Eastern 
Wheel shows to present themselves at the 
firm's houses and be denied admittance be- 
fore a legal action may be properly based. 

This course will be followed also with 
the Albany and Troy houses. 



WESTERN GAINS TWO MORE. 

The Oayety Theatre in Albany and the 
Lyceum Theatre in Troy have come into 
the Empire Circuit (Western Wheel of 
Burlesque). They were controlled last 
year by the Columbia Amusement Company 
(Eastern Wheel of Burlesque). Empire 
shows will play three days in each town, 
making a change of attractions twice 
weekly. 

Together with this announcement by the 
Empire people comes the declaration that 
others of the Eastern Wheel house are 
about to join the rival camp. It is for 
this reason, declared a manager connected 
with the circuit, that the date for the an- 
nual drawings is being held up. The date 
will not be set until they are satisfied that 
there are no more Eastern Wheel man- 
agers to be picked up. 



THE SULLIVAN KRAUS TERMS. 

According to the reported terms under 
which Sullivan & Kraus came or were 
coaxed into the Western Burlesque 
Wheel, the firm is to play the Western 
Wheel shows at its three New York City 
theatres on an equal division of the re- 
ceipts. The shows are to play Sunday 
concerts under the same sharing arrange- 
ment. They have a "50-50" arrangement 
also on the ticket speculator concession, 
formerly the sole perquisite of the house. 

The Western people are said to have 
paid Sullivan & Kraus a bonus of $10,000 
and in addition agreed to assume all 
legal expenses arising from possible liti- 
gation by the Eastern Wheel in an effort 
to prevent the consummation of the deal. 



James B. Delcher is organizing a vaude- 
ville show for Asbury Park for the week 
of July 4. 



HAMMERSTEIN HAS PHILADELPHIA 

SITE. 

Oscar Hammerstein may sign the con- 
tracts for a Philadelphia vaudeville the- 
atre and roof garden whenever he is so 
inclined within the next few days. 

The building venture will be backed by 
a prominent merchant (not Wanamaker) 
of the sleepy town and the location is on 
Market street. 

Mr. Hammerstein could' have completed 
the arrangements Wednesday last had he 
»o desired. 



MANAGERS MUST SIGN CONTRACTS. 

The various managers booking through 
the office of William Morris have been 
informed that they will be required to 
sign contracts, and as far as can be 
learned all have acquiesced. 

The Morris policy in the past has been 
to leave all managers free to come and 
go. William Morris stated during the 
week that "this is the first I've heard of 
it. M One of the managers said to a Va- 
riety representative that he had been so 
informed and intended to sign. 



* TO CONTROL DRAMATIC BOOKINGS. 

The objective point for which the new- 
ly organized combination of dramatic 
managers in the Klaw & Erlanger fold 
aim is said to be the control of all dra- 
matic bookings from "supers" to "stars." 

Taking the cue from the vaud'eville 
managers with whom they have been 
hobnobbing lately, the Klaw & Erlanger 
firm concluded to attempt to warp the 
shiny "five per cent" their way also. 

While this will not be the sole pur- 
pose of the corporation, it is the main 
principle which has guided the managers 
into a corporation, and the dramatic book- 
ing agents are in throes of serious thought 
at the prospect. 



HOT AFTER BUFFALO LYCEUM. 

Buffalo, June 29. 

TTie Lyceum Theatre in this town under 
the management of John Laughlin is caus- 
ing much disturbance theatrically. 

The house was booked last season 
through the Shuberts, but some dissension 
arose and the Shuberts have a few days 
left in which to decide whether they will 
continue the arrangement. 

John J. Ryan, the Cincinnati vaudeville 
manager, stopped off here on his way to 
Chicago anrf saw Mr. Laughlin. Laughlin 
gave Ryan an option on the Lyceum to 
become effective provided the Shuberts do 
not renew the agreement. In case Ryan 
secures it he will not build as contem- 
plated, a site having been procured by 
him some time ago but no building opera- 
tions started. 

M. A. Luescher, of New York, when in 
Buffalo a few days ago received an assur- 
ance from Mr. Laughlin that if neither of 
the other parties took over the lease he 
might have it. Luescher was anxious to 
secure the house and' left town immedi- 
ately upon ascertaining the conditions. 



FYNES READY FOR BROOKLYN. 

From latest reports J. Austin Fynes is 
about to close negotiations for a new 
theatre to be erected by him in Brook 
lyn conducted for vaudeville. 

Negotiations have been under wav for 
some lime and are now about ready. 

Mr. Fynes has been out of town during 
the week, opening up several of his 
"Nickolet" stores. 



DETROIT MAY HAVE NEW HOUSE. 

Detroit, June 29. 

H. IT. Lamkin, of Toledo, has been in 
town and it is understood that he will 
build here. There is no present theatre 
available for vaudeville. 

It is also stated that John J. Ryan, of 
Cincinnati, has offered' to go in with Lam- 
kin on the deal. 



THREATEN CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS. 

Developments followed rapidly this 
week in the fight being waged by Frank 
Melville against the Keith-Proctor-Poli 
merger. On Monday announcement was 
made that the Valley Theatre in Syra- 
cuse, which is the point about which the 
legal battle is being 'or is to be waged, 
had transferred its bookings from Mr. Mel- 
ville to the Keith office. When the ar- 
gument came up on Thursday for the con- 
tinuing of the injunction secured against 
the United Booking Offices, Herman L. 
Roth, attorney for Mr. Melville, announced 
that he was ready to go on, but Judge 
Dittenhoefer, representing the defendants, 
requested a postponement. The argument 
was accordingly put over until Monday, 
July 2, when it will come up in the Su- 
preme Court, Special Term, Part 1. 

The sudden and unexplained change of 
front on the part of the street railroad 
company that operates the Valley Theatre 
will, it is understood, be made the basis 
of a criminal action to be brought by 
Frank Melville against the parties, inter- 
ested in the "merger," in which he will 
claim that a criminal conspiracy exists to 
injure his business. 

In this suit Mr. Melville will, it is said, 
declare that threats made by the United 
Booking Office executives and the fear of 
having acts booked for the Valley Theatre 
closed because of Keith coercion, led the 
street railroad company to change its book- 
ing representative. 

It is k-tfown that the Keith people 
have been for more than a week promising 
artists time at the Valley, and in the case 
of the Stein-Erretto troupe a contract 
passed between the artists and the booking 
office calling for the week of July 9. 

The notice of withdrawal from the Mel- 
ville bookings gives the usual two weeks 
notice. In the contract which Mr. Mel- 
ville has with the street railway people 
there is no cancellation clause, but the 
agent would not say what action he pro- 
posed to take in this phase of the matter. 



ANDERSON DISSATISFIED. 

That Max C. Anderson, of Cincinnati, 
has aeclined to sign the "merger" agree- 
ment with the Keith -Western Vaudeville 
Association is receiving verification 
through a reported statement of Mr. An 
derson's that he would not do so. 

Another remark reported of Anderson's 
is that if pushed to it he would leave 
the Western people and shift for himself, 
at the same time trying to inuuee the 
Shuberts, with whom he is closelv con- 
nected in a business way, to form a sort 
of working arrangement with the office of 
William Morris. 



BIG NAMES; BIG MONEY. 
Albert Chevalier and Yvette GuilbcVt, 
who have been creating a sensation in 
Europe with their joint appearance, will 
consider a combined tour of the American 
vaudevilles for a salary of $T>,500 per week. 
Should this tender not be accepted with 
alacrity the pair may make n starring 
tour on their own account, giving nn entire 
evening's performance and changing the 
bill nightly in the week stands. 



Stine and Evans are in town after an 
absence of four years. 



The stenographer for the Columbia 
Amusement Company (Eastern Tlurlesque 
Wheel) sailed for Europe on last Wed- 
nesday morning to spend a two months 
vacation abroad. 



VARIETY 



WRIETY 

A Variety Paper for Variety People. 

Published every Saturday by 

THB VARIETY PUBUSIINO CO. 

Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 

1402 Broadway, New York City. 

Telephone 1837— 38th St. 



8IME J. SILVERMAN, 
Eld 1 tor and Proprietor. 



Entered as second-class matter December 
22, 1906. at the post office at New York, N. Y., 
under the act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

CHICAGO OFFICE, 

79 B. Clark St. 

FRANK WIESBERG, Representative. 



LONDON OFFICE, 

48 Oranboume St. 

MISS JENIE JACOBS, Representative. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 

15 cents an agate line. $2.10 an Inch. One 
page, $100; one-half page, $50; one-quarter page, 
$26. 

Charge for portraits furnished on application. 

Special rate by the month for professional card 
under beading, "Representative Artists." 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Annual $9 

Foreign -. 3 

Six and three months in proportion. 
Single copies five cents. 

Variety will be mailed to a permanent address 
or aa per route as desired. 

VARIETY may be had abroad at 

INTERNATIONAL NEWS CO.'S OFFICES. 

Breams Buildings, Chancery Lane, 

LONDON, E. C, ENGLAND. 

Make all remittances payable to Variety Publish- 
ing Co. 

' Copyright, 1906, by Variety Publishing Co. 



Vol III. 



No. 3. 



VARIETY announces 'fairness" as the 
policy governing it. 

It is conducted on original lines for a 
theatrical newspaper. Whatever there is 
to be printed of interest to the profes- 
sional world will be printed without re- 
gard to whose name is mentioned or the 
advertising columns. 

"All the news all the time" and "ab- 
solutely fair" are the watchwords. 

The reviews are written in a strictly 
impartial manner and for the benefit of 
the artists. 

VARIETY is an artist's paper, for the 
artists and to which any artist may come 
with a just grievance. 

VARIETY will not burden its columns 
with "wash" notices; it will not be in- 
fluenced by advertising; it will be honest 
from the first page to the last. 



The Zancigs returned this week after an 
absence of five weeks. 



Beatrice Golden, after some time in the 
West, is again in New York. 



Walter Meyers will be in charge of the 
"Jolly Grass Widows" next season. 



Julius Tannen will be a member of the 
Sam Bernard company the coming sea- 
son. 



The Six Provcanies, the all-girl bicycle 
act on the New York Roof, have an exten- 
sive wardrobe. 



Jack Mason may take his "Society 
Belles" act to Paris, opening there Sep- 
tember 15 next. 



Siiena Atlantica, a German singer, ap- 
|H«ared for a "try-out" on Wednesday 
evening at Pastor's. 



Horace Goblin sails next Saturday for 
Europe to fill a series of foreign bookings 
for an indefinite period. 



Ed Latel reported "sick" at Brighton 
Beach this season. The Three Dumonds 
replaced him on the bill. 



The Zingari Trio when next seen will 
have eight members, four women and an- 
other man having been ad'ded. 



Maurice Levi will be associated with 
The Great Lafayette next season in the 
production of a huge musical show. 



The Three Deltons have separated. The 
stouter one will form a new partnership 
to be known as Alberty and Delton. 

Lester and Quinn, a dancing and' sing- 
ing pair, will make their vaudeville debut 
at Henderson's, Coney Island, July 25. 



Hugo O. Marks will lead his former 
Twenty-third Street Theatre orchestra at 
"Happyland," the new Staten Island park. 



Mabel Sinclair, an English ventrilo- 
quist, has been imported by the Keith 
Agency to open on its circuit in Septem- 
ber. 



Max S. Witt's "Six Sophomores and a 
Freshman" are booked' almost solid to 
January 1. David H. Keith obtained the 
time. 



"General Shox," the automaton an- 
nounced as a new attraction for the New 
York Roof last Monday night, did not 
appear. 



There is said to be a woman up the 
State who is taller than the Russian giant 
Machnow. An active search is being made 
for her. 



Blanche Morrison, one of the Althea 
Twins, has married William (Billy) Gil- 
bert, second! baseman of the New York 
baseball team. 



Mr. Kollins, of Polk and Rollins, and his 
wife, known on the stage as Mile. Edna, 
have been reunited after a separation of 
over two years. 



Dave Ferguson, formerly of Ferguson 
and Watson, has signed ior^ "Miss New 
York, Jr.," playing the Western Burlesque 
Wheel next season. 



Last week one of the Alton troupe of 
acrobats with the Munday Carnival shows 
fell and fractured his leg. Tt will be some 
time before he can resume. 



Josephine Sabel, accompanied' by her 
husband, returned to America last week 
and will remain here until September, 
when they return to Paris. 



F. Daly Burgess has signed for thirty- 
eight weeks next season to play the part 
of the tramp juggler in Al H. Wood**' 
show, "Ruled Off the Turf." 



Hugo Morris, who has been away in 
Europe, will return on July 7, when Louis 
Pincus, of the Morris staff, will leave for 
a three weeks tour in the woods. 



Vincent Bryan has formed a collabora- 
tive alliance with John Kendrick Bangs. 
The team is now at work on a number of 
operas for production in the fall. 



The house staff for Williams' Orpheum 
Theatre in Boston has not yet been se- 
lected by Percy G. Williams, the man- 
ager. Leastwise, not for publication. 



Hugh McNally, dramatic editor of the 
Boston Herald and brother of John J. 
McNally, the playwright and reformed 
newspaper man, has in preparation for 
vaudeville what he considers an original 
singing and dancing act entitled "The 
Dainty Dairy Maids." 



A trip around the world will be made 
by Tony Wilson, Ileloise and Ainoros Sis- 
ters. Leaving New York July 3, the first 
stop will be at the Alhambra in London. 



Marie Davenport has returned to Amer- 
ica after a long tour of China and Japan, 
where she played under the name of O. 
Hana San. She has brought with her 
what Is described aa a stunning dancing 
novelty. M. S. Bentham is looking after 
Miss Davenport's interests. 



Frank Odell Gordon, formerly of Bush 
and Gordon, will appear with his wife in 
a new act called "Pierrot and Pierrette." 
The team will be known as Frank Odell 
and Rose Kinley. 



S. Miller Kent contemplates a hasty 
visit to London for his summer vacation, 
returning in August to begin rehearsals 
for the title role in Joseph Gaites' pro- 
duction of "Raffles." 



Freu' Walton, backed by a whole even- 
ing's vaudeville entertainment, is to be 
the attraction at Manhattan Beach week 
of July 10. The Kratons, a hoop rolling 
team, last year with the Black Patti 
show, was added last week by Reich, 
Plunkett & Wesley to the bill. 



Curtin and Blossom, comedy acrobats, 
last year a part of "The Innocent Maids" 
burlesque company playing Western 
Wheel houses, have signed with Sam 
Scribner'B "Morning Glories." 



Lee Harrison has been booked for 
twenty-one weeks over the Western time, 
commencing in August The contracts 
were delivered through the Orpheum cir- 
cuit office in this city, and call for com- 
mission to be deducted for the account of 
the Western Vaudeville Association. 



Leona Thurber has closed all engage- 
ments between now and August 20, when 
she will reopen at Brighton Beach. Miss 
Thurber will spend the intervening time 
with her relatives at Kansas City. 



Junie McCree has completed the sketch 
which will be used by the newly formed 
vaudeville team of Joseph Carroll and 
John McVeigh. Carroll's former partner, 
Harry Fisher, remains with Lew Fields. 



The theatres and music halls committee 
of the London County Council, in a re- 
port upon the case of the Canterbury, 
points out that "the owner can apply for 
an arbitrator to be appointed by the First 
Commissioner of Works to determine 
whether the Council's requirements are 
reasonable or not. The arbitrator's de- 
cision in such a case is final, and, in the 
event of the requirements not being up- 
held, the Council will be relieved of any 
responsibility for the safety of the pub- 
lic so far as it may be affected thereby." 



Morris Meyerfeld, Jr., president of the During a recent conversation a vaude- 

Orpheum circuit, was in San Francisco ville artist of high standing who has given 

"A/^thought to the present situation said: "It 



during the second week of Karno's 
Night at an English Music Hall," and' ex- 
tended the engagement another seven 
days. 



Fred' and Eva Mozart appear for the 
first time in New York next week at Pas- 
tor's. They "jumped" from Leavenworth, 
Kan., especially for this engagement. The 
sketch to be given is called "A Cobbler's 
Dream." 



Jerome H. Remick has entered into an 
arrangement with Lew Dockstader by 
which he will act as the minstrel's sell- 
ing agent for the songs to be published 
by the newly formed! Lew Dockstader 
Publishing Company. 



Frank Seymour, of Seymour and Hill, 
has gone to San Francisco. All of Mr. 
Seymour's relatives in that city passed 
through the troublous times after the 
earthquake. Upon his return the team 
will appear on the Metropolis K'oof in 
"Old Heidelberg." 



P. F. Nash fell off a car on Wednesday 
evening and will get around for a few 
weeks with the aid of a pair of crutches. 
He sprained a couple of tendons in his left 
leg, but, barring considerable inconven- 
ience, does not expect to suffer any se- 
rious consequences. 



is not the artist only who has to fear 
Keith. The managers booking through the 
Keith Agency may well look out for 
themselves if B. F. Keith ever becomes the 
'boss' of vaudeville. 

"On the principle," continued the artist, 
"that Keith secured all of his outside 
bookings by threats of opposition, so in a 
similar manner could he become the owner 
of the various theatres that he books by 
threatening the manager that unless he 
sold out to him he would open a 'Keith 
house' in the same city himself. 

"Supposing Keith, who wants to be the 
sold arbiter of vaudeville in America, with 
the name 'Keith' over every house, should 
walk into a town, saying to the manager 
he is then booking, "I'm thinking of build- 
ing here, but if you want to sell I might 
consider it,' what would be the result? 

"That manager became panic stricken at 
some time in the past when Keith inti- 
mated he would have an opposition house 
there. With no other place to go, and Keith 
in absolute control of vaudeville, the result 
would be that Keith would buy, and buy 
at his own figure. 

"There are managers who may have 
cause to regret their Keith connection. 
Some regret it now. A man with a the- 
atre of his own is not altogether satis- 
fied upon finding himself in the position of 
a fifteen-year-old boy carrying around his 
father's watch." 



VARIETY 



LICENSE REFUSED HURTIG & 
SEAMON. 

Commissioner of Licenses John N. Bo 
gart in a recent decision declined to per- 
mit the firm of Hurtig & Seamon to con- 
duct a general theatrical booking agency. 
Certain practices of the firm brought to 
the commissioner's attention convinced 
him, he said, that they were not fit per- 
sons to receive a license as an employ- 
ment agency. 

On May 1 Hurtig & Seamon made ap- 
plication for a renewal of the license they 
had held for the preceding twelvemonth. 
Shortly after objection was lodged to the 
granting of this privilege by the Actors' 
Union on behalf of Jefferson Gorman, of 
Gorman and West. 

The allegation was made that Mr. Gor- 
man had' entered into contract with Hur- 
tig & Seamon to play in their theatre. 
For some reason not made clear in the 
hearing before the commissioner it be- 
came necessary for the artists to sue the 
amusement concern for their salaries. The 
case was tried in a Municipal District 
Court and judgment was rendered in favor 
of the theatrical managers. 

As a part of the case the Actors' Union 
submitted the brief which had been used 
by the defendants in this suit. The de- 
fence set up at that time was that the 
vaudeville team could not recover because 
of an illegal clause in the agreement to 
appear at a Sunday performance. This 
was held to be a well-taken point by the 
inferior court and the artists were de- 
cided against. 

Upon the hearing before the commis- 
sioner Hurtig & Seamon protested that 
they were not an employment agency, and* 
brought in several outside issues, but the 
commissioner denied the renewal of their 
license on the ground that persons who 
were in the habit of making illegal con- 
tracts were not proper persons to con- 
duct an employment agency. 



A NEW CIRCUS. 

Pittsburg, June 29. 

If present plans materialize Pittsburg 
will become the headquarters of a mon- 
ster new circus enterprise. Frederick In- 
gersoll, of the Ingersoll Park circuit, will 
be the controlling spirit. 

Washington and Philadelphia capital 
will be interested. It is rumored that the 
present Hagenbeck circus will be the nu- 
cleus of the new organiaztion and it is 
intended to equal any tent show travel- 
ling. 

A meeting was held at Scranton on 
Thursday which may bring forth some 
definite announcement. The amount of 
capitalization will be fixed at ten million 
dollars. 

Mr. I nger soil's idea is believed to be 
based upon the facl that he will have to 
import large circus acts for his summer 
parks' open air shows next summer, and a 
travelling troupe will afford him wider 
scope for booking. 



HOW IT HAPPENED. 

When Joseph M. Weber opened negotia- 
tions with Lillian Blauvelt to sing at his 
music hall next season he was informed 
that she had' signed to appear in an oper- 
etta by Victor Herbert. It then occurred 
to Weber that Herbert might like to turn 
over to him the production rights. That's 
how it happened. 



ARTISTEN LOGE GROWING WARY. 

The International Artisten Loge of 
Germany, the foreign society of vaudeville 
artists with a branch lodge in England, 
has taken cognizance of the recent affilia- 
tion of vaudeville's vested interests over 
here by warning its members not to ac- 
cept American contracts unless transpor- 
tation both ways is provided for. 

Another injunction in the form of a 
motion duly passed by the order is that 
no American "blanket" contracts will 
hereafter be signed. If the contracts call 
for certain time, the weekly engagements 
must be specified', and artists are warned 
by the Loge to accept no contracts with- 
out a sufficient number of weeks to guar- 
antee a profitable trip. 

In the past several foreign artists ar- 
riving here . have been obliged to return 
shortly after. Deducting passage money, 
nothing remained. In other instances the 
"jumps" have been so expensive that 
many complaints were entered at Berlin, 
causing the organization to take notice. 

Another important matter which has 
finally received the sanction of the Loge 
is that originally proposed by Gus Willi, 
an influential member and father of the 
Willi Brothers. It forbids any artist 
paying a commission of over five per cent, 
and that amount to be retained by the 
agent only. Previously the rate has been 
ten per cent of the salary. Of this 
amount the manager usually received* five. 

A close watch is to be kept that this 
ruling is' not violated. Any manager ac- 
cepting a portion of an artist's salary un- 
der the pretense of "commission" will be 
called* to account by the I. A. L., together 
with the member allowing it to occur. 



WHO'S GOT "BUSTER BROWN"? 

Variety stated last week that Melville 
B. Raymond would send out his "Buster 
Brown" companies" next season in the 
face of all reports to the contrary from 
Messrs. Leffler & Outcault. John Lef- 
fler of the firm, takes exception to this, 
producing an authorization from the New 
York Herald vesting all dramatic rights 
with his concern. M. B. Raymond claims 
that an agreement is now being drawn 
between himself and the New York Herald 
Company giving him the sole producing 
rights. 



BROOKS DOESN'T WANT IT. 

Joseph Brooks was offered the manage- 
ment of the New York Hippodrome at a 
salary said to be $50,000 a year. He de- 
clined on the ground that it would drive 
him to an untimely grave. 



VETOED THE TRAVESTY. 

Collins and Hart had in preparation a 
burlesque on Machnow, the giant, who is 
on the same bill with them at the Vic- 
toria. The scheme was to have one stand 
on the other's shoulders, covering the two 
bodies with a long coat similar to that 
worn by Machnow. Eventually the under 
man was to open the garment and yell 
that he was growing tired of his job. 
Oscar Hammerstein vetoed the idea, fear- 
ing that it might create the impression 
that the real giant was a trick of some 
sort. 



WHITE RATS REINSTATING. 

Applications for membership and re- 
instatement continue to flow into the 
White Rats society. 

Among the applications recently re- 
ceived* have been those of Henry E. Dixie, 
Fred Hallen and Charles Grapewin, for- 
mer members. Lee Harrison applied for 
membership. 

President R. C. Mudge has appointed a 
new committee on "Ways and Means." 
Its object will be to formulate plans 
whereby the membership will be speea'ily 
and greatly augmented. 

No official report has yet been made by 
this committee. It is deliberating. 

The first Thursday night meeting oc- 
curred last week and had a large attend- 
ance. It is thought that this plan of 
midnight weekly gatherings will become 
more agreeable, with a larger attendance 
than the former Sunday afternoon sessions 
comma4g}ed. 



BRADY & HART LEASE ROOF. 

The execution of a lease for next sum- 
mer of the New York Roof by William 
A. Brady and Joseph Hart, the present 
lessees, exploded the theory that there 
cannot be smoke without some fire. 

The Keith -[Proctor combination had* sent 
forward various reports that that house 
would soon bear their joint sign, having 
gone so far as to look the theatre over 
in full view of all the press agents in the 
hope that Oscar Hammerstein would join 
them to avoid opposition. 

Mr. Hammerstein remaining adamant 
throughout the circus-like performances 
of the managers, word was passed to 
Brady to come along and get his lease, 
which he did*. 



STEEPLECHASE PIER WINS OUT. 

The Steeplechase Pier at Atlantic City 
wins the Green Room Club show for the 
night of July 21. All the theatrical 
managers mane a bid for the event, but 
the Tilyou Theatre secured the prize, 
which is the first of the benefits to be 
given for the proposed new library in the 
club rooms. 



"PHOEBE SNOW" IN A SHOW. 

The advertising sign of the D., L. & W. 
Railroad, "Phoebe Snow," will be incor- 
porated! into a vaudeville offering pre- 
sented by Jeanette Allen and company. 

J. J. Walker has written the sketch and 
there will be seven girls besides Miss Al- 
len. The scenic setting will be elaborate, 
showing sections of a thoroughly equipped 
train. 



AUSTRALIAN MANAGER HERE. 

There arrived in New York this week 
Frank Clark, manager of the Bijou 
theatres in Melbourne and Sydney, Aus- 
tralia. Mr. Clark is interested also in 
the Fuller circuit of vaudeville theatres in 
New Zealand. 

It is about twenty years since Mr. 
Clark left the United States. He returns 
now to renew acquaintances and book 
acts. 



PERIL PRESSING PUBLICITY PRO- 
MOTER. 

The manager of a well-known place of 
amusement in New York is very much 
dissatisfied with the press agent who has 
been in his employ for several seasons 
and who, he feels, has overlooked an ex- 
cellent opportunity to boom a sensational 
attraction now playing his house. Un- 
less the publicity promoter shows re- 
newed activity at once there will be a va- 
cancy for some bright newspaper man. 



INTERSTATE CO. TO BE BUSY. 

The newly formed Interstate Amuse- 
ment Company which will make legiti- 
mate dramatic and* musical productions 
to be played in the Klaw & Erlanger 
houses will not confine its efforts to that 
branch of the business. It has an option 
on a large lithographing plant in this 
town. It will also establish its own bill- 
posting service and make its own cos- 
tumes. 



Jordan and Harvey after playing four 
weeks on the Keith circuit will return to 
England. The team refused forty weeks 
offered here. 



BILLY RITCHIE WITH HILL. 

"Billy" Ritchie, now with Karno'a 
"Mumming Birds," announces that he will 
leave that company upon its return to 
New York, having signed a contract with 
Gus Hill, by whom he will be starred next 
season. 



A KEITH EXPERIMENT. 

E. F. Albee will try the experiment of 
playing George Evans for four consecu- 
tive weeks at each of the Keith New 
York, Boston and Philadelphia houses, 
Evans to provide an entirely new mono- 
logue every week. Mr. Albee has a 
theory that a really good act doesn't be- 
gin to get talked about until half of the 
first week of the engagement has been 
played. Should the test prove satisfac- 
tory a similar policy will be adopted 
with a number of big acts. 



"THE COPY" ACT COMING. 

That much advertised "copy act" Price 
and' Revost is understood to be booked 
over the Keith circuit and will very soon 
appear either in New York or Philadel- 
phia at a Keith house. 

Not satisfied with simply stealing the 
act of Rice and Prevost, the Americans, 
the foreign team, in order that there might 
be no mistake about the robbery, appro- 
priated the name with slight variation 
also. 

The fathering of this barefaced attempt 
by the Keith management does not guar- 
antee safety for any producer. 

"Price and Revost" are booked' for a 
warm reception by the other artists over 
here with whom they will be thrown in 
contact. 

1 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS WITH WESTERN 
WHEEL. 

Walter J. Plimmer, the booking agent 
for the Western Burlesque Wheel, has 
placed a number of vaudeville acts with 
the various companies playing over the 
circuit next season. 

An English act called "The Four Eng- 
lish Madcaps" has been imported for the 
Sam Devere compan y an d* will make its 
first American appearance with that 
show. 

Another foreign act appearing here 
for the first time is the Four Sisters 
Leigh, who go with the "Empire Bur- 
lesquers." 

The Reilly & Wood company will have 
Berg's Merry Girls who played for Weber 
& Rush last season. Frank OBrian will 
remain with Williams' "Ideals," while the 
Majestic Musical Four and the Vedmars 
will be seen with "Miss New York, Jr." 

Ed Begley and Al Rice will produce a 
burlesque for the "Parisian Belles" on the 
style of "The Two Johns." 






VARIETY 









LEO CARRILLO'S CARTOON OF THE WEEK. 




1 1 /// 






MORRIS WANTS RYAN'S THEATRE. 

Before John J. Ryan left New York for 
the West he received a proposition from 
William Morris to rent his new theatre 
now building in Cincinnati. Mr. Ryan 
gave Morris, who was acting for managers 
booking through his office, no decided an- 
swer, promising to write when he returned 
home. 



MUST CARRY OUT CONTRACTS. 

Arthur Voegtlin will be associated with 
Edgar Temple in the scenic and stage 
management of the new production to be 
put on at the Hippodrome. Whoever gets 
the house, if it is rented, will have to as- 
sume all contracts made with artists prior 
to the withdrawal of Thompson & Dundy. 



KEENEY LOOKING WASHINGTON 
OVER. 

Washington has been visited by Frank 
A. Keeney, the Brooklyn manager. In 
some places it is said that Keeney called 
on the Capitol City for the purpose of 
determining whether it would be profitable 
to locate another vaudeville theatre there 
in opposition to Chase's. 



DULUTH'S BIG LICENSE FEE. 

Duluth, June 29. 
The new ordinance which the City 
Council has been wrestling with for some 
time relative to charging a license fee of 
$500 daily for shows under canvas, has 
been passed and goes into effect July 1. 
This will bar out all the smaller tent 
shows. 



THE COMEDY CLUB. 

At a meeting of the Comedy Club held 
on Thursday Lee Harrison, Gen/> Hughes, 
James J. Morton and Pat Rooney were 
appointed a committee to procure a club- 
house for the organization. 

The quarters will be patterned after 
the Lambs' Club, with accommodations for 
members and a caterer. Tom O'Rourke 
may secure that position. 



TO CHANGE WINTER QUARTERS. 

Elkhart, Ind., June 20. 

A representative of Ringling Bros.' cir- 
cus has been here to close a realty deal 
between the Barney estate and the Ring- 
ling Bros. Co. The property involved con- 
tains seventy acres of land on which is a 
one-mile circular track, with barns and 
stables. 

It is expected that the circus will win- 
ter in Elkhart instead of Baraboo, Wis., 
as formerly. The consideration for the 
land is reported to be $50,000. 



MAY GET PITTSBURG. 

Pittsburg, June 29. 
It's the belief here that there will be 
another vaudeville theatre in the city. 
Since Mark Luescher, the New York man- 
ager, left town a report cropped out that 
he practically completed arrangements to 
lease a theatre now built here. While in 
the city Mr. Luescher interested local cap- 
ital in a proposed new house, and if the 
one in view is not obtainable a company 
may be formco.' and a theatre built. 



CONSIDINE AND RYAN LEAVE. 

John J. Ryan and John W. Considine, 
representing the International Theatre 
Company and the Sullivan-Considine cir- 
cuit, respectively, have gone to their 
homes. The two circuits, which book 
jointly, will handle their own acta direct 
for a time at least, although Considine is 
supposed to have entered into some sort 
of an understanding with the Keith-West- 
ern combination regarding territory in the 
Northwest. 

The Sullivan-Considine circuit would 
probably have signed with the Keith peo- 
ple had the latter not become aware 
that Considine could bind his own houses 
only, and had no authority over those 
conducted by the International Theatre 
Company in the East, which are superior 
in character and build to those of the 
Sullivan-Considine circuit in the West. 
It would be of no advantage to Keith 
to have the poorer houses. 



TURKISH BATH A GOOD FEATURE. 

Joseph M. Weber and Leo Teller's names 
are coupled as the mainstays of the cor- 
poration calling itself the Opera Con- 
struction Company, organized to erect a 
theatre in the section of Brooklyn known 
as Brownsville. The house is to be lo- 
cated at East New York avenue and 
Liberty street and will have a roof gar- 
den, banquet hall, Turkish bath estab 
lishment and rathskeller. A blanket mort- 
gage on the property of considerable di- 
mensions is to be assumed by a well- 
known Brooklyn brewer. 



NEW ACT FOR MARIE WAINWRIGHT. 

Frank Tannehill, Jr., has written and 
staged for Marie Wainwright a twenty- 
minute sketch which has been booked ior 
opening at Keith's Theatre, Philadelphia, 
July 9. It is entitled "Our Baby." Miss 
Wainwright will have as her chief sup- 
port Frank Sheridan, leading man last sea- 
son with Blanche Walsh. 



BAND LEADER DIES. 

Kansas City, Mo., June 29. 
Signor Alberto G. Rosati, leader of Ro- 
sati's Royal Italian Band now playing 
an engagement at Forest Park, died un- 
expectedly Saturday morning, June 23, fol- 
lowing an operation for appendicitis. On 
June 19, after the evening concert, Signor 
Rosati was taken ill and Thursday his 
case was diagnosed as a severe form of 
appendicitis with an operation imperative. 



NEW VAUDEVILLE PLAN SUCCESS- 
FUL. 

Pittsburg, June 29. 

The plan of playing "stock" in con- 
junction with a regular vaudeville bill 
was tried out at the Grand Opera House 
this week by Harry Davis, the manager, 
and proved successful. 

The playlet given was "The Spy." A 
capable cast presented it. The scheme is 
to give a short play each week in place 
of the usual "headline" act The rest of 
the bill will not be interfered with. 

This will be done over the summer 
Nothing further has yet been arranged 
in this connection. 



VARIETY 



OLSON BROTHERS & BALDWIN RE- 
SPONSIBLE. 

Topeka, June 20. 

In order that a clear understanding may 
be had of the nonpayment of salaries to 
the vaudeville artists appearing at Vine- 
wood Park in this city during May, when 
the receipts vanished with the local park 
manager, leaving the artists stranded, the 
Topeka Street Railway Company produced 
for the inspection of Variety's Topeka 
correspondent the original contract made 
for the leasing of the park theatre. 

The Street Railway Company owns the 
park, but doee not operate it. All privi- 
leges are let out, and the theatre was 
leased to S. S. Baldwin, of Olson 
Brothers & Baldwin, who were at that 
time located in Wichita. The contract 
plainly reads that the company assumed 
no responsibility, but was to receive ten 
per cent of Uie. gross receipts. 

Mr. Baldwin was to give the manage- 
ment of the theatre his personal atten- 
tion. Instead of doing that he imme- 
diately re-leased the theatre to W. J. 
Gardell, who after running it for a short 
time decamped without paying the artists. 

The contract with Mr. Baldwin called 
for two weeks notice before he could sur- 
render the management and this was not 
given to the company. 

When the Street Railway Company 
heard of the circumstances, through its 
secretary a correspondence was opened 
with Baldwin in an attempt to secure 
the vaudeville artists their money, but 
with no success. The company claims 
that Olson Brothers & Baldwin are re- 
sponsible for any unpaid bills and that 
firm should be looked to. 



<<i 



GOT A SUMMONS; THAT'S ALL. 

'Billy'* Gaston, after writing and plac- 
ing a few songs with John T. Hall, the 
music publisher, had some difficulty In 
collecting the balance due on his royalty 
statement for the last three months. Mr. 
Gaston demand'ed his money in vigorous 
language, having made the trip from 
Coney Island to the publisher's office sev- 
eral times with that object in view. 

Mr. Hall made an appointment, and 
when Gaston arrived, instead of a check, 
he received a police court summons. The 
next day before Judge Finn the matter 
was thrown out of court, but Gaston con- 
tinues to want his money ana' says he'll 
sue Hall if it isn't forthcoming mighty 
quick. 



HENDERSON'S TOO RISKY. 

Through the custom of playing three 
shows a day at Henderson's, Coney Island', 
the Keith Agency is experiencing some 
difficulty in booking the grade of act the 
Coney Island patrons of the resort have 
been accustomed to see at this theatre. 

Although Henderson's is famed for 
"three-a-day," the headliners who are now 
approached' by the Keith people to play 
there are in fear that it will be used 
against them as a precedent in the Keith 
continuous houses, and they may be asked 
to do "three" in the regular season over 
the Keith circuit. 



JONES AND HITE; $500. 
Walter Jones and Mabel Hite have been 
booked to play Keith's Union Square 
Theatre the week of July 16 at a salary 
of $500, 



BUREAU OF LICENSES' REPORT. 

In its report for the fiscal year ending 
May 1, just made public by the Bureau of 
Licenses, appears this section: 

"Under the amended law it is expected 
that the number of licensed theatrical 
agencies will be greatly increased'. Many 
theatrical agents held that chapter 432 
of the I jaws of 1904 did not apply to 
them. As they did not in the majority 
of cases accept a direct fee for procuring 
employment they claimed exemption 
from classification as employment agents. 
The amended law specifically includes 
them. 

"Although they are now specifically in- 
cluded in the law, it is anticipated that 
the theatrical agents will still oppose ef- 
forts to regulate their business methods. 
Their clients, however — theatrical per- 
formers for whom they procure engage- 
ments — will not regard the regulation of 
the business as an interference. Some 
of these performers have testified' that the 
theatrical agents, who control for the 
main part the business of placing per- 
formers on the stage, are enabled by their 
terms and methods to obtain from 50 to 
75 per cent of the latter's salaries. The 
law fixes a maximum scale of fees which 
the agent must not exceed." 



BEN HARRIS* BIG SHOW. 

Atlantic City is expectantly watching 
for Monday, when the all-star vaudeville 
show gotten together by Ben Harris will 
open at the Savoy Theatre at the seaside. 

The bill sounds so immense on paper 
that much speculation has been \nd\ilged 
in along the famous boardwalk over the 
conditions governing salaries. 

Were the headliners gathered under the 
Harris guidance to receive their custom- 
ary weekly allowance the capacity of the 
theatre could not provide the necessary 
amount, but it is supposed that a per- 
centage agreement will prevail, with a 
seashore vacation as a bonus. 



ALI'S HARD WORK HOLDING OR- 
CHESTRA. 

The trouble in the Hurtig & Seamon 
orchestra which had its origin in a stormy 
discussion between the members of the 
firm over retaining Joe Ali as the con- 
ductor has not been settled. 

Several members are disgruntled over 
the employment of Italian musicians and' 
threaten to leave unless the foreigners are 
discharged. The orchestra is expected 
to open on the Metropolis Theatre Roof 
Monday night. There may be some new 
faces behind the instruments, although 
the drummer and bass viol player have 
declared their intention of remaining. 



WESTERN WHEEL'S LONG LEASE. 

The Bijou Theatre in Paterson, N. J., 
has been taken under lease for fourteen 
years by Maurice Jacobs, of Butler, Low- 
rie & Jacobs, the Western Burlesque 
Wheel managers. 

The house will be entirelv refitted and 
Mr. Jacobs will make it his headquar- 
ters the coming sceason. 



ROBINSON'S SHOWS GOING TO CUBA. 

Last Saturday John G. Robinson, the 
manager for the John Robinson circus, 
left the show in Missouri to make ar- 
rangements at Tampa, Florida, for trans- 
porting the circus to Cuba next winter. 



RYAN SAYS "NOTHING DOIN'." 

Cincinnati, June 29. 

John J. Ryan, the principal head of the 
International Theatre Company end' of the 
Sullivan-Considine circuit, returned home 
this week. 

Mr. Ryan said that no house on his cir- 
cuit is for sale nor has he offered it. 

He also remarked that his circuit was 
doing its own booking and would continue 
in that way, although he had offers from 
both the Morris and Keith offices in New 
York City while there to place the book- 
ings with them. 

"Two million dollars won't buy us out," 
said Mr. Ryan. 



HOUDINI WILL PLAY FOR KEITH. 

Harry Houdini, "the handcuff king," will 
play for Keith next season. It was at 
first intended by Houdini to organize his 
own show, touring with it o'uring the com- 
ing season, owing to a difference of price 
with the Keith people. The salary ques- 
tion has been adjusted and the "jail- 
breaker" will go over the Keith circuit. 

Hardeen, Houdini's brother, has arrived 
here from England. He was booked to 
play the New York Theatre Roof, but it 
is understood' that that engagement will 
not be kept. 



STOCK FOR CHICAGO OPERA HOUSE. 

Chicago, June 29. 
D. M. Hunt, former manager of the 
Pike Theatre stock company at Cincin- 
nati, is after the Chicago Opera House to 
establish a stock company for next sea- 
son. Kohl & Castle are considering the 
proposition. If favorable the Washington 
street theatre will install Mr. Hunt's 
company about September 15, marking an 
entirely new policy. 



LESTER SINGLE AGAIN. 

After a season with Georgia Caine in 
"An Interrupted Elopement" Harry B. 
Lester will once again do a single act at 
Atlantic City next week. Mr. Lester 
has purchased the former act he played 
in from Miss Caine, but is undecided 
whether he will go out in it or continue as 
a lone entertainer. 

Miss Caine has been engaged by Charles 
Frohman and will quit vaudeville. 



BREWERS CONSIDERING VAUDE- 
VILLE. 

Milwaukee, June 29. 

The Schlitz Brewing Company entertains 
the notion of building a vaudeville theatre 
in Milwaukee, says a well-grounded ru- 
mor. It is planned to have it finished by 
season '07 -'08. 

A site is being located and an an- 
nouncement of the details is expected 
soon to be officially made. 



SOUNDS PRESS AGENCY. 

According to William T. Grover, the 
manager of the Brighton Beach Music 
Hall, a man in the audHnce fell in a fit 
caused by laughing at Simon and Gardner 
in "The New Coachman" last Monday 
night while they were playing at that 
place. 



WEEK OF JULY 16 DULL. 

Tnere is a list of 342 acts at the Keith 
Agency, all open for week of July 16. 



Nana Goldie has signed for next year 
with Weber & Rush. 



LONDON BREVITIES. 

London, June 20. 
Hugo Morris, the brother of William 
Morris, is in London. 



Augusta Glose made a hit at the Pal- 
ace last Saturday, when she substituted 
for an English turn. 



Rose Stahl closes at the Palace, Lon- 
don, and opens at the Pavilion, Glasgow, 
July 2. Miss Stahl sails for America 
July 11. She opens at the Hollis The- 
atre, Boston, September 1. 



The following artists sail from South- 
ampton on Saturday, June 23, per the 
Kenilworth Castle, for South Africa: The 
Maples, Phil and Nellie Peters, Dan Paul- 
ton, Rose Sylvester and Hagedorn's Won- 
derful Grotto. The following artists ar- 
rive here on the same day: Douglas and 
Ford, Pierce and Mazie and Mooney and 
Holbein. 



The Coliseum closes June 23 until Octo- 
ber, when it will reopen with a revue. 
There will be a general weeding out and a 
cut of salaries. Imagine a house doing 
over $15,000 a week business and not pay- 
ing expenses! Tom E. Murray, the Ameri- 
can comedian, will play the principal part 
in the revue. Messrs. Croker and Ben- 
nett have also been retained for the 
new production. The Coliseum will be 
run on the two-show-a-night plan. 



Roberts, Hayes and Roberts open at the 
Hippodrome, London, October 22. 



The latest quotations of Music Hall 
shares are as follows: Alhambra 1%, 
Canterbury 1, Drury 11-16, Empire (15s. 
paid) iy 4 , Ditto (10s. paid) iy 8 , Lane 
Gaiety 1, London Pavilion Ord. 4, Ditto 
Pref. 4%, London Coliseum %, Metropoli- 
tan %, Moss Empire 4%, Ditto Pref. 4, 
Oxford 6%, Palace 10s., Tivoli 6y 8 , Varie- 
ties Cons. Theatres 11-16. 



The Palace Theatre mourns the loss of 
Count Max Hollender, who succumbed to 
an attack of pneumonia on Monday at 
the age of fifty-one. He was chairman 
of the board of directors from the origi- 
nal formation of the Palace Theatre, Ltd'., 
until the day of his death and took a deep 
interest in all the affairs of the com- 
pany. In other respects he was well 
known in the entertainment world, hav- 
ing been interested in the financing of sev- 
eral theatrical ventures. Outside of the 
theatrical business Count Hollender was 
famed as a remarkably clever connoisseur 
of and dealer in works of art, and as one 
of the proprietors of the Hanover Gal- 
lery in " Old Bond Street. In his early 
days he was associated with journalism, 
more particularly as a contributor to the 
Paris Figaro. Hally. 



EXPECTS TO PLAY ABROAD. 

The Great Lafayette may take himself 
and show to Europe next season if book- 
ing on the other side is secured. Mr. 
Lafayette has left the foreign arrangement 
with Clifford C. Fischer, the agent, but if 
Mr. Fischer is unable to leave for the 
other side immediately, Lafayette may go 
over for a short trip to conclude the ar- 
rangements. 



B. A. Myers will return from abroad? 
July 4. 



VARIETY 



HERBERT- WEBER MATTER SETTLES). 

Everything's peaceful in the musical 
line at the Joe Weber Music Hall. Victor 
Herbert will compose the music, Charles 
K. Harris will publish it, Maurice Levy 
may conduct the orchestra until December 
1 next if he wishes, and Mr. Weber will 
supply the rest. 



TO PLAY WITH FIELDS. 

Vaudeville is going to lose Louise Al- 
len Collier. Miss Collier has signed with 
Lew Fields to play character roles in 
the production to be given at the Her- 
ald Square Theatre next season. 



MACHNOW A "STRIKER." 

When it came to the time for Machriow 
to appear on Monday afternoon at Ham- 
merstein's the Russian giant was seated 
in his dressing room and refused to stir 
until he was assured a larger salary than 
he had contracted' for. Some one told 
him Hammerstein would make a fortune 
through his appearance. Machnow has 
a mortal dread of a uniform and the only 
one in sight at that moment was on the 
house fireman. The stage manager 
promptly pressed the fireman into service, 
explaining the situation, and the city of- 
ficial advanced upon the giant threaten- 
ingly. This had the desired effect. 

STEGER ALL BOOKED UP. 

Julius Steger has arranged his route in 
the vaudevilles for next season beginning 
in September and will now sail for Europe 
to visit his family in Vienna. Mr. Steger 
is proud of his vaudeville success. After 
playing dates all next season he will star 
the following year under the direction of 
Martin Beck in a play adapted from the 
German. Mr. Beck is of the opinion that 
Steger should prove the legitimate suc- 
cessor to the late J. K. Emmet. 



AUTOMATON INJURED. 

Lo-Qua, the mechanical figure, "fell 
down" at Hartford last week. The fall- 
ing down was actual, not figurative, and 
the figure was put out of commission with 
a broken vertebra, or whatever in its con- 
struction corresponds to a backbone, and 
had to withdraw from the Fred Walton 
show. It's being repaired, however, and 
will be out of the house again soon. 



BUTTERFIELD SECURES ANOTHER. 

W. S. Butterfield, of Battle Creek, 
Mich., is rapidly spreading over that 
State as a vaudeville manager. The lat- 
est house Mr. Butterfield has added to his 
circuit is the City Opera House at Port 
Huron, the lease having been closed last 
week. 

This gives the Butterfield circuit five 
vaudeville theatres in Michigan, with an- 
other to be added shortly. 



MAURICE SHAPIRO COMING BACK. 

Maurice Shapiro writes from Europe 
that he will return to America in Au- 
gust, but gives no further inkling as to 
his future plans. It is said that he in- 
tends to once more embark in the music 
publishing business in New York. 



ARTISTS' FORUM 



CenHae your |«tt«rt to 100 words and Writs •■ •■• aids of paper only. 

Anonymous communications will not bo printed. Nana of writer must be signed and will b* 
held In strict confidence. If desired. 



New York City, June 25. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir — Sime in his criticism of my work 
at Pastor's last week is apparently in 
doubt about two points of my original 
act, and is looking forward for an ex- 
planation of the matter. I believe in giv- 
ing credit where it belongs. It seems, 
however, ridiculous to me to mention the 
name of the late Sparrow in connection 
with some of my work, and I really don't 
know the feats Mr. Sime has reference 
to. I had never seen Sparrow's act, and 
vice versa when we met on the same bill 
in Boston about six years ago. While 
some of our hat work may have con- 
flicted from a spectator's point of view the 
manipulative point differed so much that 
neither could nor would accuse the other 
of being the copyist. Furthermore, it 
would be useless to go into a more de- 
scriptive explanation, as poor Sparrow has 
passed away and cannot defend himself. 

The second point in question is: Does 
my egg trick antedate the similar one of 
Horace Goldln? Now, I never thought 
that there was a doubt in anybody's mind 
as to the origin of this tricl^ Even Mr. 
Sime seems to favor me by stating that I 
excel Goldin in its execution. That I am 
the originator of my egg trick I can 
prove with the greatest of ease, and I am 
really obliged to Mr. Sime for bringing 
up the question, as there may be others 
in doubt about the matter. I can trace 
an advertisement in the New York Clip- 
per back seven years in which I claimed 
this trick. Then I had been doing it for 
some time, however using only four eggs 
and goblets, but as soon as I heard of 
a copyist I thought it advisable to do a 
little better in order to prove my just 
claim for originality. This led to my 
using of eight eggs, etc. 

Marshall, "The Mystic:* 



l 



Coney Island, June 23. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir — In your issue of June 23 you men- 
tion the "Bootblack" song as sung by 
Miss Josie Flynn, of Washburn and 
Flynn's "Jim Dandy Girls," as the same 
song used in "Tlie Social Whirl." The 
song she is singing was written by Jack 
Carr. I wrote the music. We used it the 
entire past season with Frank B. Carr's 
"Thoroughbreds," three months before the 
opening of "The Social Whirl." I have 
proof positive that this is a fact. Who- 
ever originated Ihe song with "The Social 
Whirl" certainly cannot claim precedence. 

Sam Schiller. 

Musical Director "Jim Dandy Girls." 



Louis Hallett, after eighteen months 
spent in Denver for his health, has fully 
recovered and is now playing vaudeville 
with Bess Wright in "An Old Maid's Woo- 
ing." 



Topeka, June 22. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir — With regret I inform you of the 
death of Denny Sullivan, one of America's 
greatest clog dancers, late of the team 
Winstanly and Sullivan. He died Thurs- 
day morning in the hospital, where he 
had been since May 6. We were the only 
artists who called to see him, and we 
were with him when he passed away. He 
was thirty-three years old and born in 
Ireland. A prince of good fellows and 
liked by everyone who knew him. No. 58 



Aerie, F. 0. B., of Topeka, did every- 
thing possible; gave him burial, furnish- 
ing carriages for all artists playing at 
both parks. 

Tom Hefron, 

Myrtle Deioy, 

Lombard Brothers, 

Alvin and Kenny, 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Delay. 



London, June 4. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir — We have read your paper with the 
greatest interest and are always anxious 
for the next edition. Nearly all artists 
over here quote Variety. We always 
"accidentally" get ours from a manager's 
office when he's busy and then telephone 
him we've stolen his Variety again. Will 
you please give us a line or two in re- 
gard to our returning? We are still the 
"girls who made Hiawatha famous." We 
are bringing wardrobe from Paris, Vienna 
and London and a new act, returning June 
30 on the SS. St. Paul. Compliment you 
again and again on your paper. 

Hotel Cecil. Sisters Meredith. 



"The Oaks," 
Canal Dover, Ohio, June 21. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir — The balmy weather breezes are all 
right and everything, but I went to sleep 
between two cows last evening and in the 
night I heard an angel in a plaid suit and 
holding a bunch of contracts singing 
thusly : 

"Meet me at the Metropole at midnight, 
And we'll talk about it over our cigars; 
Meet me when Broadway is gold with 
moonlight 
And the cafe's filled with pugilists and 
stars. 
Earth has no place that is nearer heaven, 

Chicago hasn't any such delight, 
Come, come where life's a joke (only 
don't come when you're broke), 
Meet me at the Metropole to-night." 

J. C. Nugent. 

New York, June 27. 
Editor Variety: 

Sir. — Knowing your fairness in all mat- 
ters, we beg leave to refute a statement 
given out recently by Julian Rose that 
we are using his material. 

This is, of course, a most absurd state- 
ment, as it is not true. We admit using 
one "gag" which he has probably used, 
but there are grave doubts as to whether 
it is really his. We all remember an 
episode which occurred lately in which 
Julian Rose was accused of pirating a 
certain act's medley and found guilty. 

We find it very difficult to be able to 
maintain exclusive use of our original 
ideas, and believe that Mr. Rose should 
be more conservative in his accusations in 
the future and should remember the 
adage, "People in glass houses should 
never throw stones." 

S. J. Douming, 
of Friend & Downing. 



PASTOR'S. 

■ 

A hot weather bill is at Pastor's this 
week with five numbers for the first time 
in the house under New Acts. 

Elmer Tenley, "the Manahattan man," 
is the headliner. He has some fair talk 
for a monologist. That about the race 
track is good and out of the ordinary, al- 
though it requires an audience with tech- 
nical knowledge. Mr. Tenley has at least 
tried for something different and has in 
part succeeded. His Irish brogue is thinly 
spread and nicely administered. If he 
continues on the lines evidently laid down 
he will be in demand. 

Two new songs with two from last week 
are now being sung by Princess Pauline. 
The new ones are little better than those 
discarded, and the Princess makes her 
only hit with" "I've Got 'Em." As her suc- 
cess here will depend solely upon the 
songs used it might be well for Miss Pau- 
line to select something of American 
manufacture. 

Arthur Don is appearing with a new 
partner, Minnie May Thompson. She is 
quite presentable, and Don is a fair sort 
of comedian who could greatly improve 
under proper coaching. The team did very 
well here, having Miss Thompson's weak 
voice as a handicap. 

A number of monkeys and one or .two 
baboons surround Belle Hathaway and 
amuse the audience to a considerable de- 
gree. One in particular has a penchant 
for dancing, which it actually does when 
Mike Bernard obliges by the proper piano 
number after feeding the beast a choco- 
late drop. Considering the number she 
uses, Miss Hathaway handles them in ex- 
cellent manner. 

Fred Graham, as the comical end of 
Gray and Graham in a musical act, is 
about the most legitimate comedian, both 
in methods and makeup, that has appeared 
in this vicinity with a musical number in 
a long time. He looks funny and acts the 
same way. 

Miss Graham is good-looking and plays 
a large saxophone well, but the bamboo 
chimes at the opening are played' badly. 
This seems to need more rehearsing. The 
costuming is neat and the act is a first- 
class one of its kind. 

Patchen and Clifton have songs and con- 
tortions, and Max Ritter is appearing in 
a single by himself, singing coon songs 
with a rattling good voice for that pur- 
pose. Mr. Ritter also dances well, and he 
was a decided hit, although the songs used 
were not strictly up to date in the South- 
ern melody line. 

Daly and Reno, comedy acrobats and 
barrel jumpers, live up to the billing. As 
a matter of fact, the barrel jumper is the 
superior to any previously seen. He 
assumes extraordinary risks in the jumps, 
besides possessing humor to a marked de- 
gree. The act should be worked out until 
it becomes a strong feature, which it un- 
doubtedly will with the fearless barrel 
work for recommendation. 



Billy (Single) Clifford will be featured 
in Melville B. Raymond's production of 
"Little Jack Horner" next season. 



Maurice Kraus* "Twentieth Century 
Maids" will play the burlesque time laid 
out for it with a company which includes 
Toma Hanlon, Morton and Diamond, 
Joseph K. Watson, Hitter and Foster, 
Corelli and Eddie, Billy Noble and a 
chorus of twenty. The burlesque first part 
is by Aaron Hoffman and Harry Williams, 
Bloodgood is making the costumes and the 
tour will be managed by Louis J. Ober- 
warth. for five years with Frank Carr. 






VARIETY 



NEW ACTS NEXT WEEK 









Initial Presentation or First Appearance 
in New York City. 



Dronza, Hammerstein's. 
Sylvester, Jones, Pringle and Morrell, 
New York Roof. 

The Kinsons, Keith's. 
"University Girls/' Henderson's. 
Morris and Morris, Twenty -third Street. 
Edwin Baker, Pastor's. 
The Mozarts, Pastor's. 
Fred Wyckoff and Company, Pastor's. 
Rawls and Von Kaufman, Pastor's. 
Jeanre and Ellsworth, Pastor's. 
Reilly and Morgan, Pastor's. 




Machnow. 

Freak. 

Hammerstein's. 

If you want to see the tallest man you 
could think of, and much taller than you 
have ever imagined, go to Hammerstein's. 
You may have dreamed of a big fellow 
in your youthful days, but even the 
giant of your dreams will not exceed in 
height Machnow, who is exhibiting him- 
self at the Victoria. He is a freak so 
tall and ungainly that the impression is 
the giant walks on stilts. He towers 
above the ordinary person like the "Flat- 
iron" building does above the sidewalk. 
Mr. Machnow has the "handshaking" habit 
dreadfully, but does it with a lifeless and 
stupid expression. After a gingerly sa- 
lute, perhaps acquired in the army, he 
takes hold of every outstretched paw, giv- 
ing it a measly little shake. Machnow 
does nothing else excepting to d'odge the 
balcony when he is passing under it. This 
is the Russian's first public appearance 
over here. He'll prove a big drawing 
card, for no one will fully believe what is 
heard about the size of the monster until 
he has been seen. .„Sime. 



Richard F. Outcault. 

Cartoonist. 

Keith's. 

Properly speaking Mr. Outcault's offer- 
ing is a monologue with occasional il- 
lustrations. He works entirely with 
charcoal to the accompaniment of a run- 
ning fire of talk mostly having to do with 
Buster Brown and his pup Tige. From his 
clever newspaper verses one might be led 
to expect a rather better quality of hu- 
mor from Mr. Outcault. He has unblush- 
ingly made use of several "kid" stories 
of long forgotten vintage. The sketches 
were of the roughest sort, but skillfully 
done and had in them something of the 
humor of the comic supplement series. 
The Outcault name and the familiarity of 
the Buster Brown creation are what make 
the act. As monologist Mr. Outcault 
would fare but badly with the material 
he is now using. Rush. 



James A. Kiernan and Company. 
Comedy Sketch. j 

Keith's. V 

Mr. Kiernan, who was the original 
Tweedlepunch of "Florodora," has been 
playing out of town in the sketch "The 
Taming of the Beast," but is seen in the 
city for the first time. There is little act- 
ing and a lot of talk in the skit, which is 
by James Horan. John Bunyon (Mr. 
Kiernan) is opposed to the marriage of 
his son (Thomas Kiernan) to an actress 



( NEW AGTS OP THE WEEK ) 



(Jeanette Paterson) and comes into the 
lat tor's home to tell her that it can never 
be. The irascible old gentleman, however, 
falls in love with his son's fiancee. The 
comedy grows out of the rivalry of son 
and father for the hand of the actress. 
It is not easy to see what good purpose 
is served by making the son a sissified 
dude. Mr. Kiernan gets some entertain- 
ing comedy out of his part and a song by 
Miss Paterson helps. The sketch makes 
acceptable entertainment. Rush. 




Three Matinee Maids. 
Girl Act. 
Henderson's. 

This is Grace Field's former act minus 
Miss Field. Three of the half dozen girls 
that backed up Miss Field are used. The 
music carried over from the old act is 
worth while, although the girls have very 
light parlor voices, but the warmed-over 
Vesta Victoria imitations are not so well 
done as they might be. The girls are ex- 
ceedingly comely and tastefully dressed 
and give promise of working up a good 
three-cornered act. Just now in its early 
stages the act loses something from the 
fact that the girls have not yet got to 
working together with proper smoothness 
in their dances. 

Rush. 




Charlotte George. 
Straight Singer. 

Henderson's. 

A recruit from the operatic ranks ac- 
cording to the program, which announces 
her as "late star in the Parsifal produc- 
tion," Miss George brings a really fine 
contralto voice to fill out an agreeable 
ten minutes or so of music. She confined 
herself to music of the light opera grade. 
Her second number, "One Touch of Na- 
ture," was the best. It gave her oppor- 
tunity to use her lower notes, which are 
particularly pure and rich. She got along 
surprisingly well with the Henderson au- 
dience, which is somewhat inclined to a 
louder if less artistic sort of entertain- 
ment. 

Rush. 



Quaker City Quartet. . 

Songs. \f 

Twenty-third Street. 

A male quartet unknown to New York 
and apparently roped and branded some- 
where on the out-of-town circuits. Their 
act gives promise but just lacks the finish 
necessary to a successful -metropolitan 
standing. Their music and comedy are 
both lamentably lacking in up-to-date- 
ness, as instanced' by the use of the song 
"Hiawatha" for parody purposes. All 
four men have good quartet voices and the 
bass, with phenomenally low notes of 
good volume and quality, gives weight to 
the harmony. The setting of a black- 
smith shop is taken as making it neces- 
sary for three of the men to wear red 
undershirts of unblushing brilliancy and 
newness. Two run to generous waist 
lines and should seek some other costum- 
ing arrangement. The comedian, who 
works in blackface, would be first rate 
with a better lot of talk. 

Rush. 



-4 



Joe and Nellie Doner. 
"Germ Mania." 
Pastor's. 

This is the latest sketch of the Doners 
and' at the commencement it indicates 
promise, but a lapse shortly follows. If 
Mr. Doner would disabuse himself of the 
idea that he can act that would greatly 
aid him to run the skit along comedy 
lines only, which must be done if the 
success it deserves is attained. The idea 
of dVinking from a bottle a liquid which 
transforms the drinker is not original, 
but it would well serve its purpose here 
did not the man think himself a second 
Richard Mansfield. Miss Doner is a pre- 
sentable person on the stage. A little 
thought intelligently directed will make 
a good comed"y act of the "Germ Mania." 
It should be cut down, running now about 
eight minutes too long. The first song 
ought to be the finale, it dragging badly 
after that. Sime. 



Walter Schrode and Lizzie 'Mulvey. 
Dancing. \ / 

Pastor's. \y 

The program says in describing the of- 
fering, "the drunken scene and knock- 
about dance as done in 'Babes in Toy- 
land.'" It might truthfully have added 
that what Mr. Schrode and Miss Mulvey 
are now attempting was performed by 
Charles Guyer and his partner before the 
musical comedy in which they also ap- 
peared was produced. The meal on the 
table, pantomime with the beer barrel, 
"kid'" business and "rough -house" dance 
to close are followed exactly, but not 
nearly so well in any particular. Schrode 
is said to have replaced Guyer in the 
piece, While Miss Mulvey was formerly of 
the sister act associated with Pearl In- 
man. As a boy Miss Mulvey looks like 
a girl, and as a girl like a boy. Where 
the originals have not been seen the act 
may do, but otherwise it cannot pass. 

Sime. 



■\J 



Nagel and Adams. 
Comedy Duo. 
Pastor's. 

For the first time in New York Nagel 
and Adams illustrate how it is possible to 
do a great many things within a short 
perioo.' without causing comment through 
expertness in either. Appearing as a mes- 
senger boy, Mr. Nagel whistles, swings 
clubs, juggles and at the finale handles a 
baton. He is doing too much. The turn 
should be reshaped, and if the whistling 
was dropped it wouldn't harm. The par- 
ticular style Nagel affects is blowing the 
air through his teeth, resulting in shrill 
noises. The comedy is not so bad as to be 
irredeemable, and the man has an adapt- 
able face which might be put to use for a 
good effort in this direction. Sime. 



V 



Tony and Flo Vernon. 
Comedy Sketch. 
Pastor's. 

After five years the Vernons reappear 
In New York with Miss Vernon having 
such an abundance of rhinestones that she 
lias had a few dozens set to spell out the 
name "Tony." This is worn by her as 
a sort of a breast plate and illuminates 



the act. The talk and the songs with an 
English accent have no value. The paper 
tearing finale does not help much. The 
first thing needed is proper dressing. If 
the financial state compels the present 
costumes it would' be more sensible fo 
rent others than to appear as they now 
do. Sime. 



OUT or TOWlV 

Ida Gladstone, V 

Electric Park, Newark, N. J. 

Ida Gladstone from London made her 
first American appearance at this park 
last Monday. She has a fine stage ap- 
pearance and should make a name for 
herself in vaudeville. Miss Gladstone is 
about the most Americanized London 
music hall songstress seen. 

Joe O'Bryan. 



LONDON ATTRACTION FOR FESTIVAL. 

Cincinnati, June 29. 
The directors of the Cincinnati Fall 
Festival association this week signed con- 
tracts with the Shubert-Belasco people 
for the production of "The Blue Moon." 
the big London spectacle, for four weeks 
beginning August 28. This is its first 
presentation. Two hundred people are 
employed in the chorus. James T. Pow- 
ers has been engaged as leading comedian. 



BOOKINGS POSTPONED. 

It is given out at the Keith oflSces that 
the routes for the Western houses will not 
be laid out until July 10, at which time 
the Western managers are due in New 
York. 



BILLY GOULD IN PARIS. 

Paris, June 17. 
Here I am enjoying the beauties of 
Paris. There are so many Americans here 
that one would think that one was at a 
fashionable American summer resort. At 
the Grand Prix (the big race of the sea- 
son) I saw Anna Held, Fritzi SchefT, 
Charlie Dillingham, Harry Harris, Dave 
Montgomery, Ted Marks, Fred Peel, Dan 
nv Ma her, Johnny ReifT and other cHebri 
ties. 

The different shows here are very bad 
both for talent and morals. Especially «o 
is "En Puis Zut" at the Ambassadeurs, 
the best numbers being "Every Morn I 
Bring You Violets," "When You Ain't Got 
No Money, Why You NeeoVt Come 
Around" and "Under the Anheuser Busch" 
(all in French). Mildred Howard De 
Gray, the American barefoot dancer, is 
making quite a success at this place. 

Tommy Riley, formerly of Fisher and 
Riley, has given up the Shaftesbury The- 
atre in London. He is trying to locate 
here in Paris with a music hall, the last 
hour of the show to be a revue in Eng- 
lish for the thousands of Americans who 
visit here every summer. 

Valeska Suratt is buying all the gowns 
in Paris. There won't be any left for 
other customers. 

I leave for London Tuesday or Wednes- 
day and will take in all the shows in a 
week or two. 

From the talk I hear it looks as if the 
English and European artists are asking 
fabulous prices to go to America. 

Billy Gould. 



\* 



VARIETY 



Shows of the Week 



By Rush 



BRIGHTON BEACH. 

i 
Fred Walton and company are holding 

forth as the feature of William T. Gra- 
ver's seaside theatre this week, backed by 
a capable bill wherein the second place is 
occupied by Louis A. Simon, Grace Gard- 
ner and company. 

"Cissie's Dream" has undergone several 
changes in its cast, the principal shift be- 
ing the presence of Madge Vincent as the 
French doll. Miss Vincent is more sub- 
stantial than her predecessor in the role, 
but has the proper degree of round-faced, 
doll-like beauty and can dance more than 
a little. She is a graceful little person 
besides and has the proper idea of pan- 
tomimic acting. Louis Christy as the 
"Dude Doll" is also a new member of the 
company. Mr. Walton's delightful little 
dream sketch seemed to find complete ap- 
preciation with the audience, which de- 
manded curtain calls to the number of 
three or four,, notwithstanding the end 
was marred by a balky curtain.. 

"The New Coachman," the Simon- 
Gardner offering, is unchanged. There is 
a lugubrious richness about Mr. Gardner's 
voice that makes for bull's-eye comedy, 
but the horsey clownings with the step- 
ladder are drawn out to extreme lengths. 
The answer to this and to the rest of the 
roughhouse is probably that it brings the 
elusive and much-to-be-desired laughs. 
Miss Gardner is good to look upon, more 
especially so in a white princess gown. 

Ben Welch has helped himself or been 
helped to a generous portion of his 
brother's (Joe) Hebrew dialect monologue. 
Ben is not without ability as a dialect 
comedian, but his early talk is an im- 
personation of Joe, with the difference 
that he used a number of parodies that 
have gone the rounds since the season 
opened. 

Ed Latell was billed, but at the last 
minute sent word that he was sick. The 
Three Dumonds were called upon to fill 
the gap. Mr. Dumond was very well liked 
in his violin solos. His straightaway 
numbers found enthusiastic appreciation 
and he should realize that before a better 
class audience an artist of his ability 
needs none of the shallow trickeries he 
employs. 

The Five Gregorys, a hoop rolling 
troupe, opened the bill. They have little 
that is novel or worthy of special notice, 
and the ordinary tricks they give are not 
well done. The act on Tuesday night was 
spoiled by a constant succession of slips. 
Their aim seems to be to fill the stage 
with motion by throwing and juggling the 
hoops, but until working more smoothly 
they will not be able to make this sort 
of material effective. 

Nellie Nichols, singing comedienne, has 
a voice of agreeable quality. She sang 
three numbers, one of them being "Wait- 
ing at the Church," which did not have 
the usual Vesta Victoria impersonation 
with it. 



Maurice Boom averted' a panic in his 
five-cent theatre on Grand' street the 
other day by thrusting his fist into the 
mouth of a woman who yelled "fire!" 
Another three-hundred-pound female 
promptly fainted and Boom, in an at- 
tempt to carry her from the auditorium, 
sprained his back so badly as to lay 
him up for repairs. 



HENDERSON'S. 

And still the Fourteen Black Hussars. 
They appear to have become fixtures here. 
Sunday night's audience just wouldn't 
let 'em go after their final bass drum 
finish and that marked them as favorites. 
They are opening the bill again. 

The Three Matinee Maids, which served 
as the vehicle for Grace Field last year, 
is now out without a leader and is under 
New Acts. Charlotte George is also in 
that classification. 

The Garrity Sisters in their usual 
dancing and singing form are elaborately 
costumed and have chosen their songs 
with judgment. The dancing of the pair 
was well liked. 

The Three Armstrongs bill themselves 
as "cyclone cycle comedians," but should 
work faster to deserve the caption. The 
costumes of the two straight men re- 
semble those of a bicycle club rather than 
of stage performers. Their riding, how- 
ever, was consistently smooth and their 
feats worth while. 

The Kita- Banzai Troupe of Japanese 
carry a gorgeous setting for a mixed act. 
They have attained remarkable skill in 
pedal juggling and Risley work and 
scored an emphatic hit. The special back 
drop used is said to have cost $3,500 and 
looks the value. 

The Kimball Brothers make up as a 
newsboy duo. One of the pair has a good 
voice for vaudeville purposes and some 
fairly funny although rough comedy busi- 
ness is worked in by the other. 

The Red Hussars rival the military or- 
ganization of similar name and different 
color in the particular of noise making. 
They have all the advantage of this sort 
of competition, however, for the reason 
that the Black Hussars have to make 
their own noise, while that of the girl act 
is manufactured in a powder mill. The 
drilling was excellent. They have im- 
proved since last seen hereabout and their 
maneuvres go with considerable snap. 

Maceo and Fox were not so good. The 
man of the pair is well enough as a 
dancer, but permits the woman too great 
prominence in the act. Neither have 
voices of value, but the woman is the 
poorer of the two. She does not dance 
well, either. 

A rather odd comedy musical act offered 
by The Kinsons has material for a first- 
rate novelty offering, were it skillfully 
managed. The comedy man is the pos- 
sessor of a freak voice with which he is 
able to imitate musical instruments, in- 
cluding harp, violin, banjo, etc., with un- 
usual accuracy. The straight man con- 
tributes cornet solos. As it stands the 
act is too much on the English style, both 
players and the heavy comedy they use 
having apparently been imported. 

Buch Brothers do well in their gym- 
nastics, but need coaching in the comedy. 
Among the others on the bill were Evelyn 
Sisters, Mile. Latina and The Trillers. 



TWENTY-THIRD STREET. 

Rather a weak bill to follow the ex- 
cellently featured offering of last week, 
but furnishing a fair amount of warm 
weather entertainment. The Quaker City 
Quartet, seen for the first time in New 
York, will be found under New Acts. 

May Vokes and company, the latter 
half of the title meaning Gus Pixley, are 
showing "The Model Maid," which gives 
Miss Vokes opportunity to play a slavey 
role, in which she had considerable success 
in "My Friend From India" and "Check- 
ers." In her methods she rather recalls 
the work of Louise Allen Collier in "A 
Fool and His Money." The entire weight 
of responsibility for the aet rests upon 
her shoulders, Mr. Pixley being a mere 
feeder, and none too good a one at that. 
The sketch went to the accompaniment of 
laughs and was liked by the Twenty-third 
street audience. 

Frank Bush had some new talk and a 
considerable quantity that was far from 
being new. Of the two varieties of jokes, 
the old ones were by far the more success- 
ful. One of his old standbys, which has 
been helping him earn a living these half 
dozen years, went with a large scream, 
while several new ones, really good, fell 
flat. Mr. Bush may console himself by 
the thought that when he has told these 
new stories for a decade or so they also 
will be accepted as funny. The finish to 
the act was first rate. 

Ed F. Reynard figured in the electrics 
in front of the theatre along with Grace 
Cameron and May Vokes. His ventrilo- 
quial act with the clever mechanical ef- 
fects goes through entertainingly and 
without slips. 

Louise Montrose and Her Auto-girls is 
a fairly well dressed and very lively girl 
aggregation. The four girls that consti- 
tute Miss Montrose's backing are not. as 
graceful as they might be in the male at- 
tire of the second number, but the final 
whirlwind chorus and dance compensates. 

The Josselin Trio, "Cleofus, Rosa and 
Dora" the program hath it, make up a 
good-looking three in aerial work, but 
are rather quiet for a closing number. All 
are dressed entirely in white, with white 
wigs and work in a black setting. The 
effect is showy and most of the acro- 
batic work is well done. Hermany's 
trained cats and dogs, now handled by a 
substitute while the original trainer is 
in Europe preparing another act, were 
well liked. The dogs work rapidly for the 
most part and have some good comedy 
stunts, while the white "statue dog" 
makes an interesting feature of the act. 
Harry Young and May Melville, a dancing 
and singing pair, open the bill. The 
woman spoils an attractive custume by 
wearing an arrangement suggestive of 
visible dressing shields. 



"Yours Merrily" John R. Rogers is look- 
ing after the bookings of an Irish soubrette 
named Nora Kelly, who has just landed. 
She Ls a genuine Irish girl with a brogue 
so thick that huge hunks might be chipped 
off it with the proverbial axe, and in addi- 
tion to an ability to sing well is both 
young and pretty. 



Charles E. Taylor, at present managing 
the Lyceum Stock Company at Washing- 
ton, will go out next season in charge of 
a Dinkins sho~w on the Western Burlesque 
Wheel. 



KEITH'S. 

Richard F. Outcault's first New York 
vaudeville appearance is the Union 
Square's feature this week, under New 
Acts. In the same department will be 
found James A. Kiernan and company in 
a comedy sketch seen for the first time 
in New York. 

For the rest the bill strikes a good aver- 
age. Edward Stevens in a little skit 
called "A Night Out" overcame the dis- 
advantage of a late position. The sketch 
has plenty of bright talk and a sprightly 
young person described on the program 
simply as "Miss Marshall" helped out a 
lot. Mr. Stevens has a gift of humor 
that makes it possible for him to pro- 
duce effective comedy without resorting 
to noise or clowning. 

If, as the program declares, an Eng- 
lish critic declared "For Reform" to be 
the smartest sketch ever produced in the 
United Kingdom, the comedy sketch mar- 
ket abroad is in sorry pass. The sketch 
is funny enough in a semi-burlesque vein 
and has many real laughs in it, but its 
wit is a bit leaden for American pur- 
poses. Hugh Stanton does not get all 
that he might out of his part. Miss Mo 
dena as the wife is rather better. 

Raymond and Caverly call their side- 
walk conversation act "Secret Service," 
but don't tell why. There is some fairly 
good talk of the usual German sort, but 
the laughter comes out of the rich dia- 
lect of the pair and the familiar trick 
of mixing language. 

Aurie Dagwell has replaced her second 
number with "Waltz Me Around Again, 
Willie." The rest remains unchanged. Argyo 
Kastron, billed as "former soloist with 
Sousa's orchestra and Calve concert com- 
pany," was liked. Her violin solos are 
for the most part beyond the complete 
appreciation of vaudeville audiences, but 
the Greek artiste plays with unusual 
technical brilliancy, making her perform- 
ance a showy one. 

Robert Baker, of Baker and Meno, 
should get a new costuming arrangement 
to replace the tights he wears with some- 
thing rather less diaphanous. Some of 
his standing jumps were good, but the 
act has little else either in comedy or 
tumbling departments to recommend it. 

One of the Amoros Sisters has been 
watching W. C. Fields in his eccentric 
juggling and has copied a few of his 
easier tricks rather cleverly. This mem- 
ber of the pair is an energetic person and 
puts a good deal of action into her work. 
The other sings a Frenchy song and fin- 
ishes with stunts on the trapeze. The act 
gets away from the regulation woman 
team and was entertaining. 

Tony Wilson and Miss Heloise in a 
triple bar act with tremplin closed the 
bill. She does a lot of hard work and 
makes a sort of even balance to the team, 
the man being very heavy. 

The others on the bill were The Miller- 
ship Sisters, Alexander, a female imper- 
sonator with an unusually clear voice, 
Ed Estus and 0*Laughlin and Cohen. 



Miss Grace Gardner, of Simon and 
(\ardner, will spend the summer at Nan- 
tucket, Mass. Miss Gardner has purchased 
two saddle horses to help pass the hours 
away. 



Sylvester, Jones and l'ringle, the singing 
trio, have added another member, Mor- 
rell, formerly <»f Morrell and 1 Evans, mak- 
ing a quartet. After a "try out" at the 
New York Roof last Sunday they were 
engaged for the season there. 



10 



VARIETY 



The Chas. K. Harris Courier 

Devoted to the interests of Songs and Singers. 

Address all communications to 

CHAS. K. HARRIS, 31 W. 31st St., N. Y. 

(Meyer Cohen, Mgr.) 



Vol. 2. 



New York, June 30, lDuu. 



No. 7. 



MY. A. Liibln, our bus- 
tllug representative, 
can now be found at 
tbe Elwood Hotel, At- 
lantic City. N. J., 
where we will be lo- 
cated for the next two 
weeks. Readers of 
this paper can find 
Mr. Lubln at tbe 
above mentioned hotel 
during his stay at 
Atlantic City, unless 
he happens to find 
you, and if you are a 
singer of songs It is 
a safe bet that Lubln 
won't overlook you, as 
he Is well supplied 
with professional cop- 
ies of all the Harris 
publications, also band 
and orchestra arrange- 
ments for tbe bands 
that play at tbe dif- 
ferent piers and all 
the hotel orchestras. 
Should you desire an 
orchestration In a n y 
key, Mr. Lubln la pre- 
pared to have same 
arranged for you. As 
be knows almost 
everyone In vaudeville, 
It is safe to say that 
Lubln will have his 
hands full for tbe 
next two weeks, not 



forgetting the fact 
that be haa his trusty 
violin with him, ready 
to teach songs at any 
and all hours. Many 
an old timer will 
know what this 
melius. Now smile! 

Alexander, who pos- 
sesses one of the 
greatest voices ever 
beard in vaudeville, 
has been meeting with 
great success at 
Keith's New York 
Theatre the past week 
singing "Dreaming, 
Love, of You," and at 
every performance has 
had to respond to 
three and four encores, 
and, owing to tbe big 
success it has made, 
It will be kept in 
Alexander's repertoire. 

Gypsy Bellalre, a clever 
little dancing sou- 
brette and late of tbe 
Weber Stock Co., con- 
templates entering 
vaudeville, having re- 
ceived several wonder- 
ful offers, and will 
make a feature of 
"The Tale of a 
Stroll," "Won't You 
be My Girlie" and "Is 
Everybody Happy?" 



SUMMER PARKS 

White City at Milwaukee opens to-day. 
Many free attractions. 



The Lagoon at Cincinnati has closed a 
contract with John L. Sullivan to appear 
at the park for one week. 



Lasky & Rolfe's new musical act "The 
Black Hussars" has been booked for two 
weeks at Sohmer Park, Montreal. 



Manager Rodriguez of the Midget City 
at Dreamland has engaged a flea circus 
which will be seen in Dreamland the first 
week in July. 



Montague's Cockatoo Circus is playing 
in a building solely devoted to their per- 
formance at Young's Pier, Atlantic City. 
The birds are extremely well trained and 
it is one of the youngsters' favorite re- 
sorts. * 



The Breinig circuit of parks in Indiana 
and Illinois will include a new park in 
Freeport, 111., now being built by the 
Breinig Construction Company of Terre 
Haute. The attractions in the park will 
include a theatre and a figure eight. 



Oscar Ergott, manager of the Opera 
House at Coney Island, Cincinnati, will 
conduct a season of comic opera beginning 
July 1. The company consists of twenty 
principals, with a picked chorus of sixty. 
The first opera will be "The Mocking- 
bird." 



There is to be a "Dreamland" park in 
Washington and it is announced to open 
July 4. The location will be on the line 
of the electric railroad now completed to 
Great Palls. A fireworks display under 
Pain's direction will inaugurate the park 
and the chief attraction will be a Ferris 
Wheel of immense construction. It is be- 
lieved that one of the smaller grounds on 
the river bank has been taken by the rail- 
road company for the purpose and that no 
expensive effort at least for this season 
will be made. 



HAPPYLAND, STATEN ISLAND. 

If Happyland Park at South Beach, 
Staten Island, is opened to the public 
to-day, as this week's announcements 
promised 1 , a vast amount of fast work 
will have been done within the last six 
days. The prospects were not so very 
bright when a Variety representative vis- 
ited the resort last Monday. 

Happyland is said to occupy eight 
acres, but the space within the main court 
appears considerably less than that. The 
ground plan is roughly of a triangular 
form with the featured attraction, Ki- 
ralfy's "The Carnival of Venice," occupy- 
ing the position of honor in the southeast- 
ern corner. 

To the west of this' stand is the scenic 
railway, built by the L. A. Thompson 
Company for the park people, and! follow- 
ing around the triangle the attractions are 
arranged in about this order: Scenic rail- 
way, "Foolish House," "Under and Over 
the Sea," panorama and numerous smaller 
concessions. 

From west to east on the north side 
of the inclosure are the ballroom, vaude- 
ville theatre, old German beer garden ano! 
restaurant. These present a solid and 
uniform front. Because of its great 
width and lack of height this building 
has, in its uncompleted state, a rather 
ungraceful appearance which may large- 
ly be relieved' by ornamenting the front. 

The centre space is given over to a 
small lake from which rises a circle swing 
and the band stand. Carl Von Wegwin's 
band of twenty-five pieces will give free 
concerts here. 

The east side, facing the Lower Bay, is 
taken up by the executive offices, Japa- 
nese tea garden, Trip in the Air, Vesuvius 
and a large roller skating rink. In the 
centre of this side is the main gate which 
gives entrance from the boardwalk. 

The circle swing is of wood instead' of 
iron and far from completion. On Mon- 
day only the main framework was in po- 
sition, and even the wooden flooring of 
the main court showed gaps in several 
places. All of the other concessions were 
in various stages of incompleteness, but 
be in readiness by to-day. 

An admission fee of ten cents is charged 
at the gate, which entitles patrons to the 
free attractions, the band concerts, the 
ballroom, helter-skelter and the vaude- 
ville theatre, for which Reich, Plunkett 
& Wesley are doing the booking. 

According to a member of the South 
Beach Amusement Company, the corpora- 
tion which is financing the enterprise, the 
completed park will represent an invest- 
ment of $250,000, although the expendi- 
ture of that sum is not apparent. Stock 
to that amount has been issued and taken 
up by twenty-five subscribers. Oscar A. 
Kruger, of the Bachmann Brewing Com- 
pany, of Staten Island, is president. Al- 
bert Hergenhan is the general manager. 

Rush. 



George C. Hale and Fred W. Gifford, of 
Kansas City, Mo., brought suit in the 
United States Circuit Court at Cincinnati, 
against the "Trip to California" com- 
pany and J. E. Garette and Joseph Metz 
for an alleged infringement of a patented 
improvement in a pleasure railway. The 
charge is that they are both operating 
and selling the device. An injunction and 
accounting are sought. The improvement 
is the converting of the car into a ship. 



LONDON NOTES. 

Another bunk theatrical agent, W. Cecil 
Watson, twenty-three, has been sent up 
for eighteen months. At the Lyceum Her- 
cat parodies Pinero's play title with a 
farcical, ventriloquial and magical sketch 
called "Her House in Disorder." Other 
new sketches are "Touched Up," "The 
Players," "The Emperor's Divorce" (Napo- 
leonic), and the "King of Sahara" at the 
Oxford. 



Maskelyne's last great illusion has a 
$250 prize title "The New Page." A boy 
in page attire is strapped upright in a 
narrow box, and found standing on his 
head when the box is opened. Of cour&j, 
the page turned over is a "new page." 



CORRESPONDENCE 



CHICAGO, ILL. 
MAJESTIC (C. E. Draper, mgr. for Kohl A Cas- 
tle).— "Tbe Magic Cap," presented for the first 
time at this theatre, consists of John Mylle, Fanny 
Ide and seven good-looking and sumptuously cos- 
tumed girls taken from P. C. Whitney's musical 
productions. The Idea follows a series of extrava- 
ganzas with similar "magic" titles to give it a 
spectacular background. It is neither new nor 
novel and almost entirely lacking in comedy. 
Mylle is a good dancer and with better material 
could be funny. Miss Ide has an acceptable voice. 
"A Strenuous Proposal" Is offered by Claude Gll- 
Ungwater and company. Tbe sketch starts out 
admirably with good anticipations, but becomes ir- 
relevant as it progresses. Mr. Gilllngwater is 
capable and competent to remedy the defects. 
Kate Condon made her first appearance in vaude- 
ville and her sweet contralto voice was beard to 
advantage. A better selection of songs would 
give her more opportunities. Ward and Currau re- 
peated their familiar sketch and amused Immense- 
ly. Lizzie Evans and Harry Mills In "The Old 
Love" have a sketch that is poorly written. It 
is not as good as any of their previous vehicles 
and should be dropped. Allan Shaw offers the 
most dexterous coin manipulating act seen here, 
and with his refined, youthful and convincing 
manner made a decidedly good impression. La 
Martyne and Nlelson are fair vocalists, but selec- 
tions not altogether pleasing. Cameron and Flana- 
gan have a neat talking and singing act. The ec- 
centric and acrobatic dancing is good. De Van 
Brothers, assisted by a dog. are fair acrobats, 
offering nothing new. De Hollins and Valora find 
comedy In their juggling act by breaking a lot of 
china. King Kollins is an expert banjolst aud the 
addition of a classical selection would strengthen 
the act considerably. Coyne Brothers have an old- 
time song and dance specialty with a paper-tearing 
finish. Leonore and St. Clair, singing and danc- 
ing, won responses for their efforts. 

OLYMPIC (Abe Jacobs, mgr. for Kohl A Cas- 
tle.). -Manager Jacobs Is provided with a good bill 
this week. Eddy Poy presents his "Cartoons" 
ami the various burlesque Impersonations create 
much laughter. Clayton White and Marie Stuart 
offer "Paris," a sequel to "Dickey" and much 
Letter than the latter, containing an abundance 
of vivacious humor, enough spice and animation 
to credit these clever artists with a well-deserved 
success. Una Clayton and company, consisting of 
Francis Morey and Marie Gebhnrdt. present 
"What's In a Name," which contains all the ele- 
ments to incite laughter. It is acted in a thor- 
oughly capable manner and scored a hit. Pour 
Emperors of Music in a pleasing Instrumental musi- 
cal act won several encores. The operatic selec- 
tions rendered by Pierce and Roslyn call for 
more than ordinary commendation. Both have 
splendid voices and sing effectively and harmon- 
iously. Several changes In costume are made, all of 
which are gorgeous and particularly the silver rai- 
ment worn by the man is a work of artistic in- 
genuity. Phyllis Allen used her contralto voice 
to good advantage and the songs pleased. Welch, 
Mealey -and Montrose offer their comedy acrobatic 
act and duplicate their previous success. Joe 
Whitehead and Grlerson Sisters have the same act 
seen recently and succeed through the efforts of. 
Whitehead, a good comedian and excellent eccen- 
tric dancer, with a method to merit a good plsce 
on any bill as a single entertainer. Qulgg and 
Mack are remindful of the old familiar Irish 
comedy knockabouts, only that the "knockabout" 
business Is eliminated in their act, which could 
i-e made less noisome with better material. 
Dorothy Rae has a good voice and pleasing manner. 
Lazar and Lazar offer a fairly good musical act, 
but a lot of the dialogue has been heard so often 
at the local theatres that It has no value except 
for tbe purpose of taking up time. Kippy, the 
juggler, la amusing In bis specialty. 

TROCADERO (I. M. Welngarden, mgr.).— Busi- 
ness continues large, surpassing all expectations. 
The stock company presents a merry musical con- 
coction entitled "In a Whirl," properly applied to 
the brisk humor furnished by unctuous Nat Fields 
and associates, Nat S. Jerome, Leo Kendall, J. 
W. Sherry and Ed Morris. The musical numbers, 
especially the baseball song effectively rendered 
by Bessie Taylor and chorus, received several en- 
cores. Tbe olio la rather weak and not up to the 
usual merit. Dot Halcott gives a fair type of 
the Bowery vernacular, but her effort at eccentric 
dancing Is deplorable. Freeman and Watson 
appear as newsboys In an ordinary singing and 
dancing specialty. The talk la tame and ancient. 
The dancing on roller skates was liked by the audi- 



Cobb'e Corner 

JUNE 30. 1906. 

I — 
No. 18. A Weekly Word With WILL the Wordwright. 

Call And see me about that SKETCH, 
that ACT, that S0NG f that PARODY. 

'Twon't cost you Anything to talk it 
over. 

If your "turn" needs a half-sole and 
heel, or a patch, bring it to 

WILL D. COBB 

WOBD WRIGHT 

Theatrical Exchange Bldg., 

1481 BROADWAY, 

MEW TORX CITY 



ence. The "ttnte" act of the Three Phelpa opens 
with a stereotyped song and dance by two women 
with a later attempt at "Patsy Bolivar" comedy. 
The man has a fair conception of a Rube, but 
should dress tbe character properly. Lewia and 
Chapln run entirely too long even for tbe patient 
Trocadero audiencea. Tbe act la a mixture of 
singing, dancing and jokes that have served a 
decade but make a favorable Impression. The 
woman looked stunning In a white costume. Bat- 
tling Nelnon and "The Girl in Blue" are retained 
as extra features. 

WHITE CITY (Paul D. Howse, mgr.).— The big 
amusement resort haa added another diverting nov- 
elty to Its list of attractlona. This time It is a 
circua, with all the features of a tent show given 
under circumstances never before attempted. In 
place of tbe spread of canvas and flaring gasoline 
torches of the typical circus the performance is 
given in the plaxa, illuminated by thousands of 
electric lights, with court of honor, peristyle and 
tower forming a fascinating background. Other 
free outdoor attractions are also offered by the 
Mardo Trio, acrobats; Budd Brothers, comedy acro- 
bats; Zamora. aerial artist; Konoldo, cake-walking 
horse; Walker and Van Mehl, revolving ladder 
performance; Cameroni and bis slide for life, 
and Will J. Dickey, brass band singer. A new 
Igorrote Village has been opened for the first 
time and is attracting curious throngs. Jewell's 
Manikins, Otto's Animals, Fire Show, Trip to Mars 
and several of the other concessions are liberally 
patronized. Kryl and hla band in the band shell 
and La Bolsslere's fine organization of muaiclans 
in the plaza furnish concerts. Manager Meagher 
has a good bill In the vaudeville theatre. Those 
enlisted are Mildred Flora, Manning Trio, Peter 
J. Smith. Doyle and Granger, Robert Nome and 
Lottie West Symonds. Business continues large. 

SANS SOUCI PARK (Leonard Wolf, mgr.).— 
The musical program presented by Slg. Oresta 
Vcssella's Banda Roma is one of the attractive 
features and tbe crowds that congregate around 
the pavilion find real diversion in their rendition 
of popular and classical selections. Tbe various 
attractions are receiving attention. The vaude- 
ville bill consists of tbe Bedouin Troupe of Arabs, 
Baader-Lavelle Trio, Charles and Annie Glocker, 
Nellie Florede and Arthur Kherns. 

RIVERVIBW PARK (Wm. M. Johnson, mgr.). 
—The interior of this resort presents a thoroughly 
cultivated public park with Its natural atmosphere, 
spacious boardwalks and shady trees. The spec- 
tacle, • "The Fall of tbe Golden Gate," draws 
large crowds. Tbe production Is a combination of 
fireworks and "fighting the flames" show, covering 
an area of ten acres, with 400 feet of scenery rep- 
resenting San Francisco before the earthquake. 
The performance opens with a fete night in China- 
town with a ballet. The earthquake cornea and 
destruction reigns. A complete Are brigade takes 
tbe conspicuous part of the show. The musical 
end Is furnished by the United States Government 
Indian Band, an organization composed of thor- 
oughly capable Indian musicians. Tbe Igorrote 
Village. Hale's Tours, Kansas cyclone, Vassar girls 
and Wild Animal Show are all interesting. 

CHUTES.— Elter in aquatic exhibitions continues 
to be the leading feature. Several new soloists 
with Pozzl's band are beard in a series of classical 
selections. The pony hippodrome and Niemeyer's 
Theatre are well liked by the great west side 
multitude that flock to "Shoot the Chutes." 

RAVINIA PARK (J. J. Murdock, mgr.).— This 
resort is situated in tbe most beautiful and health- 
ful spot on Chicago's north shore. The summer 
season opened with Walter Damroscb and his New 
York Symphony Orchestra for alx weeks, to be 
followed by tbe Theodore Thomas' Orchestra. 

COLISEUM.— Well and hla band and the return 
engagement of Maud Rockwell in vocal selections 
attracts large audiences. The coming of Ellery's 
band July 7 is announced by tbe management. 
This organization under the directorship of Ferullo 
created a sensation here last year, and the present 
engagement will extend far Into the summer. 

NOTES.— Ziska and King opened their season at 
the Orpheum. San Francisco, and are booked over 
the entire Western circuit. Arthur Stewart and 
Hazel Keeley, of the Keeley Sisters, were united 
in marriage in this city June 19. Turpln and 
Nichols, comedy cyclists, are playing parks in the 
middle West. They are scheduled to open on one 
of the Western circuits shortly. Sid J. Euson's 
Theatre closed Its first and last season as a stock 
burlesque house. During the summer the interior 
and exterior will undergo Improvements, reopening 
In August with the Columbia Amusement Com- 



X 



VARIETY 



11 




HOW ABOUT THAT ACT ? 



pany's attractions. The Richmond Hotel, a well- 
known rendezvous for theatrical people, has been 
entirely remodelled and refurnished by Al J. Flynn 
and compares favorably with any modern hostelry 
In the city catering to the profession. The team 
of Palmer and Jolson is no more. It has been dis- 
solved by mutual agreement and Al Jolson is doing 
his singing and whistling specialty alone. Joe 
Palmer retires from the stage and will start in 
the laundry business on the north side, this city. 
Fern Melrose, the soprano, made her appearance in 
vaudeville at Chester Park, Cincinnati. Ruth 
White, of "Burgomaster" and "Tenderfoot" fame, 
is a debutante in vaudeville. She is assisted by 
eight girls known as the "Kangaroos" and the act 
is being tried out this week at Saginaw. Carl 
l>. McCullough and company, including Paul Mc- 
Carthy and Belle Cooper, recent recruits from the 
legitimate, are preparing a musical comedy sketch 
for vaudeville and have secured booking in the 
Western houses. FRANK WIBSBBRG. 



ALBANY, N. T. 

PROCTOR'S (Howard Graham, res. mgr.). — 
Week 25: Paul Spadoni, juggling, big hit; Metro- 
politan Trio of operatic singers, excellent; S'tin- 
son and Merton, good; Gorman and West were 
enjoyed; The Flood Brothers, comedy acrobats, 
were very good; Taylor Holmes, imitations, good; 
The Musical Huehn, comedy instrumentalist, 
clever. ELECTRIC PARK.— Week 25: Good at- 
tendance. Princess Chinqullla and Ed Newell were 
enjoyed; Rlchy W. Craig is a clever comedian and 
musician; Jack Lyle, comedian, kept the audience 
in good humor; Leclalr and Hart do some good 
stunts with the aid of invisible wires and cause 
much merriment; Cbas. Sabine. Marty O'Neil and 
Mile. Vera in "The Arrival of Kitty MeCarty" 
were good. M ARTEL. 

ALPENA, MICH. 

BIJOU (Steele A Denlson, mgrs.).— Hunt Stock 
Company, 26. Marie Fitzglbbons, coon songs, lilt, 
L. M. Coppins, good; Hunt Quartet — M. A. Hunt, 
L. M. Coppins, A. C. Knight snd Thos. Daucet — 
well received; Arthur Langway, wooden shoe 
dancer, fair; Kate Fitzglbbons. soprano, always a 
bit here. GEO. J. OUILBTTE. 



ATLANTA, GA. 

CASINO (H. L. De Give, mgr.).— Packed to the 
doors opening night week 26 and a pleased audi- 
ence saw the following bill presented: Meers 
Brothers in eccentric wire act were applauded; 
Le Roy and Woodford, conversationists, made a 
good impression but were handicapped by having 
been seen here only recently. Chadwick Trio, only 
average, though the juvenile member of the team 
is a good dancer; Waterbury Brothers and Tenny, 
musical act, unquestionably the hit of the bill: 
Madame Tberese Renz in high-school melange act 
had the headline honors and brought the show to 
a close, leaving a fine impression; new moving 
pictures were also shown. BRIX. 



ALTOONA. PA. 
PARK THEATRE, Lakemont (L. T. Shannon, 
mgr.). — Week 25: Bissett and Winters, comedians 
and dancers, hesdllners, proved a drawing card; 
Harry Baker, Altoona's favorite comedian, with 
his muslcsl act, received liberal applause; Harris. 
Beauregarde and company In "The Country Judge," 
good; James R. Adams. "The Clown on Stilts," 
scored; Waldorf and Mender, acrobats, well re- 
ceived. The free act outside theatre continues to 
be popular with the crowds. The management re- 
ports the best business of any week since the 
park opened. C. G. C. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 
BLBCTRIO PARK (Schanberger & Irwin, 
mgrs.).— Week 25: Vaudeville at the big Casino 
Includes: Edwin Clark and his "Six Winning 
Widows," pleased immensely; Laura Millard, prima 
donna, has a splendid voice; Allen snd Dalton, 
comedy musiclsns, delightful; The Three La Maze 
Brothers, acrobats, good; Tascott, the "coon" 
shouter, scored; The Edgetorls Troupe of scrobats 
give performances on deck after the vaudeville. 
Fisher's band concerts still continue. 

G. J. WOLFF. 



BURLINGTON, IA. 

GARRICK (Vic Hugo, mgr.).— Garrlck Stock 
Company week starting Monday, June 25, present- 
ing two bills, "Nick Carter" and "Charley's 
Aunt," both well received. MADISON AVE- 
NUE PARK.— Vaudeville, Al. Chrlstal, humorist, 
and others. O. G. C. 



CINCINNATI, OHIO. 

ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS (Walter M. Draper, 
secy). — I nnes and his band coutlnue another week. 
On Monday eveniug the numbers were exclusively 
a "symphony" program, Tuesday evening was 
grand opera ulgbt, Thursday "Ye Olde-Tynie Con- 
cert," while on Friday evening the selections were 
limited to Wagner music. The greateat enthusi- 
asm centred in the cornet solo work of Herman 
Bellstedt. Virginia Listerman, soprano, has been 
added as a soloist and made her tirst appearance. 
As a special added free attraction Rice's Dog, 
Pony and Monkey Circus gave two performances 

dally. The performance pleased immensely. 

CONEY ISLAND (Anderson A Brooks, mgrs.).— 
The program this week consists of Mysterious 
Jaques, trick trunk and handcuff act, quite clever; 
Marions and Grace, singers and dancers; Casad and 
Deverue, musical sketch. Mack and Relgler and 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ellsworth In a sketch, "The 
Silk Stocking," were also on the bill. CHES- 
TER PARK (I. M. Martin, mgr.).— In the vaude- 
ville theatre a pleasing bill Is offered. The Ozaffs, 
burlesque jugglers, were applauded; Mme. Emmy 
and ber trained dogs are excellent; Miss Fern 
M'elroee, singer, made a hit with coon songs; L. 
DeArien, contortion set, winding up with a sensa- 
tional double shoulder dislocation feat, well done. 
Emerson, Emmonds and Kmmonds are the best 
trio of comedians who have sppeared here this 
Beason. H. HESS. 



BAL 



PROFESSIONAL 

TRUNKS 



COLUMBUS, 0. 
OLENTANGY PARK (Will Prosser, mgr.).— 
Marguerite Ebrlich, age eight and a half, with ber 
father and mother in "Wanted— An Errand Boy" 
took the house; Alfred Anderson, "the male 
Melba," well received; Nlobe aud Riley in a danc- 
ing act, well liked; The Three Hillyers, fair; The 
Gordens on bicycles, well received; Armluta and 
Burke, pleasing; Mr. and Mrs. Fred Lucier, fair. 

INDIANOLA PARK (Cbas. Miles, mgr.).— 

Woods and Woods, high tight rope act, well re- 
ceived. Powel's Military Band, good. 

E. R. SPERRY. 



DES MOINES, IA. 

INGERSOLL PARK (Fred Buchanan, mgr.).— 

Week 24: Valerie Bergere and company In "Car- 

men" were well received. Lew Hawkins aud 

Fredo and Dare are good. Robert De Mont Trio 

and Flo Adler. IOWANA PARK (W. R. Gour- 

ley, mgr.).— A vaudeville bill will be put on here 

next week. UNDER CANVAS.— The Carl lln- 

genbeck Greater Shows, Ju!y 9. The Hageubeck 
circus has an excellent line of paper this season. 
Kingling Bros.' Shows July 27. 

U. V. REAVER. 



EASTON, PA. 
ISLAND PARK (D. E. SeGulne. mgr.). -Week 
25: Demoulo and Belle, singing and dancing, well 
received; King aud Stange, scored; Adams and 
White, musical specialty, good; Golden and 
Hughes, blackface, fair; Ed and Bertha Holland, 
pantomimic specialty, hit of the show. Big busi- 
ness. MAC. 



ELKHART, IND. 
CRYSTAL (Jack Benliaui, ingr.). -Week 25: 
L. Martella. fair; Warren and Howard, moderate; 
Blanche Freeman, Illustrated souk, good; The 
Great Paul, "The Mystilier." assisted by Miss 
Paul, does a reilned act. Coming: Berrlan and 
Macklln, Caylor and Jefferson. Howard Dotson, 

Illustrated song. NOTES. During week 18: 

The J. Frank Hatch Carnival Company had with 
them an amateur "handcuff king" who had used 
the three sheets of The Great Paul at a local 
house this week. Mr. Paul, through his attorney 
at Grand Rapids, is serving an injunction 00 the 
carnival company to prohibit the use of his name. 

C. A. B. 



ERIE, PA. 

WALDAMEER (ThoS. Maloiiey, mgr.). Week 

25: Billy Johnson and his Creole Belles In "Going 

Home" and "From the Jungles to the Parlor" sup 

ply the amusement and the acts arc going well. 

FOUR MILE CREEK (II. T. Foster, mgr.). 

BUI commencing 24 is a good one. The Bud Far- 
mini Trio, a musical act, made such a pronounced 
hit last week that they have been held over; 
Edythe Doyle, comedienne; Richards, clever foot 
juggler; Josephine Oassnutn and her "Picks" In 
"The Chinese Idyl" pleased and the acrobat le 
work of the Harmon 'l*rio was liked. 

L. T. BERLINER. 



EVANSVILLE, IND. 

OAK SUMMIT PARK (Edwin F. Galllgan, 

mgr.). — Jennings and Renfrew, blackface come 
dlans, are the headlined week 24. Well received. 
Mcltt and his dogs, good; Blanche Frayne, tinging 
and dancing, fair; Phllbrookl and Reynolds, Dutch 
comedy, good; Frank Bowman snd company, magi 
clan. food. Moving pictures closed. COOK'S 
PARK (Harry Laurance, mgr.). The three Dle- 
rick Brothers In feats of strength were the free 
attraction 24, good act; Kennedy and Evans. Irish 
comedians, fair; Gertrude Dudley, soprano, well 
received; Iyeonard and Drake, comedian'*, good; 
Carrolton and Hodges, comedy sketch, fair; Mile. 
Naomi Ethardo, equilibrist, good. 

ROBERT L. ODELL. 



TAKE YOUR DOG ON A PULLMAN. 
Wa make the only dog case that will heat the 
Pullman porter. Send for Catalogue V. 

WILLIAM BAL (Inc.), HO W. 40th Strcle 



FORT DODGE, IA. 

Forepaugh Sells' Circus comes 28. About $2,000 
Is now being spent in beautifying Olesou Park. 
Ed. Hopper, of the Sells' Floto Shows, is resting 
a few daya at bis liome In this city. Our 56th 
Regiment Band opened the new opera house at 
Webster City, la., June 12. N. P. Hyatt will be 
the local manager. G. W. TREMAIN. 



FRESNO, CAL. 

NOVELTY (B. Veno, mgr.). — Week 18: 
O'Rourke-Bennett Trio, hard shoe dancers, good; 
Varrlck and Lplonda, lightning change artists, 
good; Burke Brothers, Jugglers, good; George 
Keene, illustrated song, good; Sam Rowley, "the 

little man with a big voice," gooa. EMPIRE 

(E. Hocn, mgr.). — Moreys, musical artists, were 
received with little applause. Golden West 
Comedy Four has been retained for another week. 

Comedy weak, but singing good at times. 

RECREATION PARK (H. F. Blackwell, mgr.).— 
T. Nelson Downs, "King of Kolus," great; The 
Great Delrnas, aerial artist, good; (Jllroy, Haines 
and Montgomery, comedy trio, in refined singing 
and talking, have one of the best acts ever pre- 
sented here. The 18th was the opening of this 
resort, which will continue open through the sum- 
mer mouths. BOB. 



GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

RAMON A (L. Delamarter, mgr.).— Week 24: 
Estelle Wordette and Jules Aasell in "A Honey- 
moon in the Catskllls" head the bill with an excel- 
lent act; Paul Kelst, spectacular musical act, 
made good; The Melnotte-Lenole Trio have a first- 
class novelty and comedy wire act that pleased; 
The Four Alviuos, clever on the rings and as baud 
balancers; The Delaceys, who have been here be- 
fore, and Charles Inues and Maud Ryan have 
singing aud dancing specialties. Next week: Mc- 
Waters, Tyson and company, hesdllners. 

C. H. HALLMAN. 



i 



ITHACA, N. Y. 

HENWICK PARK.— This weeks bill has: Lillian 
Ma > nai d, comedienne, fair; The Lowltts, good; 
Short and Shorty, excellent; Geo. W. Hussey, ven- 
triloquist, good; Eckel and Warner, food. 

J. B. IIERSON. 



JAMESTOWN, N. Y. 

CBLOBON PARK (J. J. Waters, mgr.).— Vaude- 
ville week 25; Blown and Nevarro, colored ch-ir.ie- 
ter change act, good; Al Lawrence, mimic and 
monologiat, very good; Shungopavl, lndl.ui magi* 
plan, fair; <Julgg, Mai kay and NIckerson, good 
musical act; Hutchlnson-Bainbrldge company In 
the Sketch, "The Idol Smasher," clever, and Reed 
and Shaw, good trapeze act. Business keeps up 

at this resort. NOTE. — The Famous Nohrens In 

a high dive ire underlined for the outdoor attrac- 
tion on July 4. L. T. BERLINER. 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 
FOREST PARK (Uoyd Brown. mgr.).— Rosati's 
Royal Italian Band was re-engaged for another 
week beglunlng 24. The Four Casting Dunbars 
furnished one of the most finished acts ever seen 
here. At Hopkins Theatre the following artists 
pleased: LeBrun Grand Opera Trio; Mr. and Mrs. 
F. Marion Pierce, who play on various musical 
Instruments; Hallen and Hayes, singers and danc- 
ers; Murray K. Hill, nomologist, aud Fisher and 
Johnson, comedy bicyclists. Business continues to 
be big. -ELECTRIC PARK (Sam Benjamin, 
mgr.). — Week 24 was the final one of a very suc- 
cessful engagement. Harry DuBell, aerial bi- 
cyclist, was here for an additional week. In (Jer 
•nan Village the following vaudeville bill: Bonnie 
(in/, the Australian contralto; Dill and Ward, 
wooden shoe dancers; Marie LoClair, Singer, and 
Band* and Wilson, buck and wing artists. 
FAIRMOFNT PARK (Ben Rosenthal, mgr.). 
Palos Val Jean, a French high diver, attracted 
good business week 24. Prof. Hlner'S Band fur- 
nished the music. ■*• 



KENOSHA, WIS. 

Farces and moving pictures take the place of 
the regular theatrical season, which closed here 
last Sunday. The farce for first half of week 
of June is, entitled "i'lie Two Ministers," en- 
acted by Fanny Hatfield ntid company, makes a 
big hit. Ed La Rose as Mr. O'Hara, ex minister, 
keeps t lie audience hooting all the way through, 
while Tom Glbbens as Mr. Timid scored. F. J. 
O'Brien as Mr. Brown has opportunities to use 
his talent as a comedian. The last half of the 
week opens With a retlned sketch by Marguerite 
Newton and company, entitled "Love's Strategy." 

AL NICHOLS. 



LEAVENWORTH, KAN. 
peoples (('has. Cunningham, mgr.). Week 
24: Fair bill to good business, Woodson Sisters 
take well; Moiia Marshaw makes a hit and has 
good voice; Busch Family, trio with trapeze, come- 
dy Of the ls«y a scream; 0. E. Haslet, illustrated 
song, pleases. MICK. 



Songs That Win on Their Merits 



Greatest Song 
Hit in Many 
Years 




Sutg 
with the 

very 
greateat 

sucoess 
hy 

Vesta Victoria, 
Blanche Ring, 

Elsie Janie, 

Eddie Foy, 
Etc., Etc, Etc. 



rt 111,1 sii kks 



FRANCIS, DAY ft HUNTER 

15 WEST 30th STREET, NEW YORK 

HKTWEE.N IIKOADWAY AND FIFTH AVKNUH 



I^eroy 
bany. 

I".. kin 

Is to 

make 

of Ha 

gone 

Wells 

lielng 



LOGANSPORT, IND. 

CRYSTAL (Tom Hurdle, res. mgr.).— Mr. and 
Mis. ]>. if. Hall, sketch artists, highly entertain- 
ing; Huntress, female impersonator, good ; Phil 
Conner. BOBgS, good; Pottl and Potts, musical 
Japs, above par; Filer and Mctzgcr. Mid-season 

business. HOWLING (J. E. Howling, mgr.).— 

Bates snd Earnest, German comedians, funny; 
Florence Fields, well received; Gordon Eblrld, 
comedian, well liked; McCune snd Grant, acrobats, 
big favorites; Harry Jones, songs. 

RBVILO. 




and Woodford Jump from Atlanta to Al- 

Jake Wells and Otis Harland were here 
g after their park Interests. The intention 
put In boardwalks around the park lake and 

a 40-f<»ot promenade. Under the guidance 
rry GreenXvay and Jack Young the park has 
above expectations. The Idea of the new 

theatre has not died out snd locations aro 
looked after. JNO. W. BAILEY. 



MONTREAL, CANADA. 
RIVERSIDE PARK (Al E. Resd, mgr.).— 21 
saw cool weather and heavy rain, clearing, how- 
ever, for good opening In afternoon and a splendid 
bill is presented for the week. The Famous Jack- 
son Family of cyclists show a fine troupe and are 
appreciated; Sadl Alfarabl. a Russian equilibrist, 
made good; Two Rappo Sisters, Russian dancers, 
good; La Nole Brothers in a ladder act, above 
the average; Mowers, Walters snd Crooker, "Three 
Hiil.es, " in dancing, acrobatic and trapeze work, 
are funny and went big; Zimmerman's band con- 
eerts are popular; The .Millman Trio were so popu- 
lar they were requested by the patrons to give 
an extra, performance 24 afternoon, which they 
did. A Ferris wheel has been added to the out' 
side attractions.— DOMINION PARK.— Weedon's 
lions and other attractions, 24, good attendance. 

SOHMER PARK (Lsvlgne & Lajole, mgs.).— 

2o: One of the best bills of the season. Lavlgne'a 
baud concerts are still in favor. Ralph Johnson, 
the cyclist, is showing enough thrillers to satisfy. 
• He is a wonder In his line. Morris and Morris, 
comedy acrobats, good; The Golden Russian Troupe 
of eight singers and dancers are big favorites; 

The Three Bartellls. acrobats, are popular. 

NOTES.— The Jackson Family sail July 3 for 
Paris, where they are booked one month. Sohmer 
Park has Installed an orchestra phone Imported 
from Paris. It represents an orchestra of sixty* 
tlve pieces. AL M. PRENTISS. 



MUSKOGEE, IND. TER. 

LYRIC (Fred Seherubel. mgr.).- Week June IH: 
Thomas, good act; Ijcilarr, contortion act, good ; 
Harrison Brothers, "The Ruts' and Old Maid"; 
Cole and Cole, novelty acrobats and head balancers. 

w. ii. ii. o. 



NEWARK, N. 7. 

PROCTOR S (R. C. Stewart, mgr.).— Week 25, 
good bill ami attendance. R«»se Cogblan, assisted 
by Edward Emery, in "The Ace of IVumps" 
score a notable success. Bert Van Alatyne and 
Louise Henry made a hit, the former by his 
piano selections and the latter by her imita- 
tions. Mureena-N'evaro -Mareena, acrobatics, good. 
Lillian Shaw with her dialectic songs went well. 
Coin's dogs crested a lot of laughs. Carl Her- 
bert, fair with magic. He is a fast worker and 
could improve his act; for one thing he could 
drop out the rings now used by all amateurs. 
I'hil Rado, good contortionist and acrobatic danc- 
er, aud his partner, Jessie Bertman, a clever 
character change artist, but they are not equipped 

with the right vehicle to display their talents. 

OLYMPIC PARK (Hans Wevers, mgr.).— Week 
2.".: The A born Opera Co. produced "Era DIavolo" 

to large audiences. HILLSIDE PARK (Wm. 

Thaller, mgr.). — Week 2f>: Olive Swan snd her 
Wild West Show hold forth and still continue 
to draw well. Prof. Archie Grlffen will do 
quite a stunt on July 4 with his balloon and 
parachute.— ELECTRIC PARK (C. A. Dunlap, 
mgr.). On tin- ttosrds this week: Orletta snd 
Taylor, operatic singers, were encored repestedly; 
The Tlirc Juggling Bannans were liked; Irene 
Lee and her "Candy Kids" went well; Henry 
Frey, the tramp monologue artist, la always wel- 
comed In this city; Ida Goldstone (see New Acts). 

JOB O'BRYAN. 



NEW CASTLE, IND. 

ALCAZAR (B, F. Brown, mgr.).— BUI 25: Rob- 
ert Bingham and Norma Thornton In "After a Hus- 
band," well received; IniI h have rich voices. Eddie 
Lamont, comedy musical act, decided hit; Melroy 
Trio, two girls and one young man, hit; singing 
and dancing excellent. 'IVmi Hanlln. Illustrated 
songs, good. ROY W. JONES. 



12 



VARIETY 












NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

WEST END PARK (Thos. 8. Winston, mgr.).— 
Week 24: A good bill to excellent business. Reck- 
less Reklaw offered a fair bicycle act. A good 
working. partner would break tbe monotony. The 
Rosa Ires scored with a clever wire act. Tbe Idea 
of blindfolding during tbe lamp trick Is superflu- 
ous. Anna Franklin rendered a new batch of se- 
lections and Gilllban and Perry offered their act 
unchanged. Week July 1: Maya and Hunter, Pero 
and Wilson. The Rosalres and Reckless Reklaw. 

NOTES. — W. Langley Jennings, treasurer of 

West End Park, was married 28 to Kate B. Rut- 
ledge. Rosalie Sheldon, a local soprano, la billed 
to appear at West End Park for one performance 
29. Walter S. Baldwin has leased the Orescent 
Theatre until October 1 for his Baldwin Melville 
Stock Company, as bis new theatre now building 

will not be ready until then. ATHLETIC 

PARK (Slg Faranta. mgr.).— Maud Daniel Nov- 
elty Company, which opened 24, offers a very poor 
show. O. M. SAMUEL 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

KEITH'S (H. T. Jordan, mgr.).— The bill this 
week larks class and Is one of the weakest that 
has been offered this year. Mr. and Mrs. Sidney 
Drew are given the place of honor and presented 
their well-worn act, "When Two Hearts Are 
Won." The sketch la entertaining enough to 
those who have not become tired of It, and the 
Drews received applause. They are clever enough 
to offer something new, which they need badly. 
John and Bertha Gleeson danced cleverly as 
usual and offered a variety of atyles that de- 
served the recognition their work received. Fred 
Houlihan filled In the breathing spells with some 
Imitations on the piano. John Gelger and Nellie 
Walters made their first appearance here in a 
musical offering called "In tbe Streets of Italy." 
and were accorded a warm reception. Gelger Is 
a local product and was remembered with a 
handsome floral piece on Monday* He Is new 
here In character* work and pleased, while be has 
added several new Imitations on the violin, which 
he playa cleverly. Miss Walters sings only fair 
but shows a marked aptness In handling a hurdy- 
gurdy of the street-piano variety and tbe novelty 
waa good for several encores. Sabel Johnson, who 
appeared with Katherlne Hayes In a "slater act" 
with tbe Fays at the Garrlck, did a single turn 
here and made a strong Impression. Miss John- 
son's strong point Is her charming personality. 
She lacks vocal quality bat la good to look upon 
and this wins her audience. Tbe class of comedy 
acrobatic work done by Swan and Bam bard Is so 
seldom seen here that this pair pleased wltb their 
old act. Tbey work easily, depending upon Bam- 
bard's comedy to carry them through and did 
well. According to the program Ada Lane and 
Albert Green assisted Jack Wilson In a sketch 
which was called "An Upheaval In Darktown" 
without any apparent reason. There are some 
good spots In the act, but It is sadly overdressed 
and Green's attempts to be funny are as bad as 
bis amateurish costumes. Palfrey, of Palfrey and 
Hilton, appeared with a new partner, Hoefler. 
Their bicycle act Is little different from the other 
and won Its share of applause. Charles Howard 
In a Hebrew monologue scored a bit. He used 
some old Jokes along wltb new ones and bad one 
or two good parodies. Tbe Eight Allisons repeated 
their acrobatic feats to generous applause. A 
poorly constructed sketch called "A Dip Into 
Vaudeville" waa given by Oarr and Jordan. The 
original team of this name was a Keith bead liner 
several years ago. The musical numbers are 111- 
flttlng and tbe piano and organ playing Is bad. 
Tbe pair did better In their travesty work and 
need to construct their act on this line. As It Is 
now It can hardly please. Barto and Lafferty, the 
Gagnoux, Mile. Edna and Ed Mulle n an d his dog 

Dixie were also on the bill. NOTES. — This Is 

the final week of the stock burlesque company at 
the Trocadero. The house will be closed to permit 
work on tbe Improvements for next season. The 
Bijou and Lyceum will continue to offer stock 
shows. KINKS. 



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PITTSBURG. PA. 

THE GRAND (Harry Davis, mgr.).— The bill 
this week rather marks a new vaudeville era. 
Marlon Ballou, Alice Gale, Charles Abbe, Minna 
Phillips and George Probert, all old-time favorites, 
with Oscar Ragle as the new member, form the 
stock company that Manager Davis has installed 
in connection with his vaudeville bill and which 
made Its premier production* Monday afternoon. 
The play selected, "Tbe Spy." is a strong bit of 
tragic drama by Cecil Raleigh. There Is a touch 
of conventional melodrama, but the comedy spar- 
kles and the denouement grips the attention. Miss 
Ballou plays with a vivacity of manner and clear 
comprehension of the part. Miss Gale has one or 
two moments and takes creditable advantage of 
them. Miss Phillips in what little is